Chugach

Eklutna Lake

brochure Chugach - Eklutna Lake

covered parks

Alaska State Parks Photo courtesy of Frank Kovalchek To learn more about Eklutna Lake’s natural and cultural history, explore the interpretive exhibits located near the boat access and trailhead. In 1970 Governor Keith Miller signed the bill creating Chugach State Park. Thanks to the efforts of concerned and organized citizens, the wild Chugach will always be part of the Alaskan experience. Chugach State Park The first Eklutna hydroelectric power plant began servicing Anchorage in 1929. Today, the Eklutna Power Plant provides approximately three percent of the area’s energy requirements. Power “Chugach State Park” on Facebook csp@alaska.gov Chugach State Park Headquarters Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 www.alaskastateparks.org Eklutna Ranger Station Mile 10, Eklutna Lake Road (907) 688-0908 in Chugach State Park Eklutna Lake For More Information Area Highlights Wildlife Welcome The Eklutna Lake Valley was carved by the Eklutna Glacier. When the glacier receded, Eklutna Lake was left in its wake, tucked in a valley flanked by the towering Chugach Mountains. This 7-mile-long lake is fed by glacial and freshwater streams and dominates the Eklutna Valley like an inland sea. Located in Chugach State Park, the Eklutna Lake Valley includes a campground, day-use area, and miles of trails to enjoy. The Eklutna Lakeside Trail provides recreational opportunities for bikers, snowmachiners, and ATVers, while a boat launch provides access for fishermen and boaters to explore Eklutna Lake. Eklutna Lake is a critical resource for local residents. Every day, the Anchorage Water and Wastewater Utility (AWWU) delivers nearly 30 million gallons of water to Municipality of Anchorage residents. That is roughly 127 gallons of water per person per day! Almost 80% of the water comes from Eklutna Lake. Water Eklutna Lake (Idlu Bena) is a culturally significant area for local Dena’ina Athabascans, who have lived in Eklutna (Idlughet) for hundreds of years. The mountains surrounding Eklutna Lake were the upland hunting area for the Eklutna people, who hunted Dall’s sheep, bear, and ground squirrels. Dena’ina Athabascans Area History Welcome to The lake and the surrounding alpine landscape are home to diverse wildlife such as moose, muskrats, brown and black bears, ptarmigan, mountain goats, and Dall’s sheep. Make sure to bring your camera. Camping Eklutna Lake Campground has 50 campsites with an additional eight overflow sites. Each site has a fire pit and picnic table, with access to water and latrines. There is a picnic shelter for group activities in the day-use area. Trails The Eklutna Lake Valley has 25 miles of trails for people of all abilities. You can go for a bike ride on the Eklutna Lakeside Trail or venture deep into the backcountry following the East Fork Eklutna River Trail. Check the map inside to plan your next adventure. Photo courtesy of Catherine McKillips Campers heading into the backcountry can use three remote campgrounds along the Eklutna Lakeside Trail: Bold Airstrip Campground near mile 8; Eklutna Alex Campground at mile 8.8; and Kanchee Campground at mile 11. There are latrines at each campground and a picnic table and fire ring at each site. Public-Use Cabins Whether you want to hike, ski, horseback ride, or dog mush, the Eklutna Lake Valley offers great ways to enjoy Chugach State Park year-round. Photo courtesy of Rebecca Noblin On the Water Enjoy a day floating or fishing on Eklutna Lake. Electric motor boats and non-motorized boats are allowed, and kayaks can be rented locally. The boat launch is for hand-carry vessels only. Make sure you always wear your lifejacket. There are two public-use cabins accessible from the Eklutna Lakeside Trail. Yuditnu Creek Cabin (at mile 3) sleeps a maximum of eight and has a woodstove and nearby latrine. The Serenity Falls Hut (at mile 12) is a multiple-party hut that sleeps a maximum of 13. Both huts are managed on a reservation basis (http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/). Photo courtesy of Catherine McKillips Background photo courtesy of Benjamin Wagner Photo courtesy of Claire LeClair Photo courtesy of www.lifetimeadventures.net Entrance Booth ATV Snowmachine Trailhead Lifetime Adventures CH Camp Host Eklutna Lake Campground Area of Detail Group Sites Day Use Area Overflow Campsites na E t klu e k La Kn ik Ar m Area of Detail Anchorage Turn a gain Chugach State Park Arm Learn Outdoor Skills Legend This brochure does not tell you everything you need to know about venturing into the Chugach. Get informed, take a class, or bring an experienced friend. Tell a friend where you’re going, who you’re going with, and when you’ll return. This is VERY important if something unexpected happens. Parking Boat Access Camping Snowmobile Trailhead ATV Cabin/Hut Ranger Skiing Airstrip Route Biking Trail Bridge Technical assistance provided by the National Park Service—Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program. Boat Safe Park Rules Wind from the south can create whitecaps and sizeable waves on the lake, making boating dangerous. Always wear a life jacket. • ATVs are only allowed on the Eklutna Lakeside Trail Sunday through Wednesday, April 1-November 30 • Only non-motorized and electric motor boats are allowed on Eklutna Lake • Camping is limited to 15 consecutive nights Access Take the Glenn Highway to the Eklutna exit at milepost 26.5. Follow signs. Trails Eklutna Lakeside Trail Access: Eklutna Lakeside Trailhead Travel Means: Motorized multi-use Distance: 12.7 miles one way Elevation Gain: 300 feet The Eklutna Lakeside Trail provides scenic access to the north shore of the lake and the Eklutna River Valley. There are views of steep canyon walls, waterfalls, and Eklutna Glacier. Twin Peaks Trail East Fork Eklutna River Trail Access: Eklutna Lakeside Trailhead Travel Means: Foot Distance: 2.5 miles one way Elevation Gain: 1,500 feet Access: Mile 10.5, Eklutna Lakeside Trail Travel Means: Foot Distance: 6.5 miles one way Elevation Gain: 700 feet This climb rises above Eklutna Lake into Dall’s sheep country and ends with a panorama of the Eklutna Lake Valley and Knik Arm. There is good berry picking on the upper trail in fall and the open tundra invites exploration. Shaded by tall spruce and birch, this trail parallels the East Fork of Eklutna River to a glacial lake reflecting the surrounding peaks and glacier. Along the trail you’ll see Tulchina Falls and Mount Bashful, the tallest peak in Chugach State Park. Bring a map, compass, and sense of adventure. Stream crossings are not bridged. Bold Ridge Overlook Trail Access: Mile 5, Eklutna Lakeside Trail Travel Means: Foot Distance: 3.5 miles one way Elevation Gain: 2,500 feet The Bold Ridge Trail begins at mile 5 of the lakeside trail and climbs steeply into the alpine area. The tundra supports an abundance of hardy wildflowers and berries. The trail ends on a ridge at the base of Bold Peak. Eklutna Glacier Background photo courtesy of Jenny Baker

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