Delta

National Wild and Scenic River Wayside - Alaska

The Delta Wild and Scenic River Wayside is located at MP 21.5 on the south side of the Denali Highway and is for day-use only (no camping). The wayside is equipped with an accessible picnic area, water and toilets. The boat launch provides access and parking for extended wilderness canoe trips in the Upper Tangle Lakes system to the south, where numerous lakes of all sizes provide important wildlife habitat.

maps

Travel Map of the 135 miles long Denali Highway in Alaska which connects Paxson on the Richardson Highway with Cantwell Junction on the Parks Highway. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Denali Highway - Travel Map

Travel Map of the 135 miles long Denali Highway in Alaska which connects Paxson on the Richardson Highway with Cantwell Junction on the Parks Highway. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13B (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - GMU 13 B - Moose and Caribou Hunt Restrictions

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13B (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Sourdough Controlled Use Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Sourdough Controlled Use Area

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Sourdough Controlled Use Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Paxson Closed Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Paxson Closed Area

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Paxson Closed Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of Susintna River / Alaska Range East in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Susintna River / Alaska Range East

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of Susintna River / Alaska Range East in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure for Delta Wild and Scenic River (WSR) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Delta - Brochure

Brochure for Delta Wild and Scenic River (WSR) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Delta NWSRW https://www.blm.gov/visit/delta-wild-and-scenic-river The Delta Wild and Scenic River Wayside is located at MP 21.5 on the south side of the Denali Highway and is for day-use only (no camping). The wayside is equipped with an accessible picnic area, water and toilets. The boat launch provides access and parking for extended wilderness canoe trips in the Upper Tangle Lakes system to the south, where numerous lakes of all sizes provide important wildlife habitat.
Portions of the Delta River were designated for its wild, scenic, and recreational characteristics as part of the National Wild and Scenic River system by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980. The upper stretch of the Delta River, all of the Tangle Lakes, and the Tangle River were recognized for their outstanding scenery and natural and cultural values. These Bureau of Land Management National Conservation Lands embody our vision for conserving our public lands. Open to everyone, they offer Americans the unique opportunity to explore and experience the landscapes that shaped our nation. Whether you fish, hike, hunt, or boat, these lands represent our way of life, a living link to the past and our pledge to tomorrow. A “Wild” river is free of impoundments, generally inaccessible except by trail, and has exceptionally clean waters. “Scenic” segments are free of impoundments and have shorelines that are largely undeveloped, but are accessible by road. “Recreational” segments are accessible by road and may have some development along their shorelines. U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management The Setting The Delta River watershed is in the Alaska Range in Southcentral Alaska. River access is along the Denali Highway, about 22 miles west of Paxson. Year-round recreational opportunities abound throughout the river’s watershed, which includes 150,000 acres of land, 160 miles of streams, and 21 lakes. The Tangle River connects several of the Tangle Lakes and then drains into the Delta River, which joins the Tanana River, before flowing into the mighty Yukon River. The terrain around the Tangle Lakes is predominantly tundra-covered rolling hills with glacial features such as moraines, eskers and kettles. Gravel benches above Lower Tangle Lake show that the current lake was about 50 feet higher at one time. The land adjacent to the upper Delta River includes steep alluvial slopes, rock cliffs and spectacular geologic features. Elevations average 2,800 feet at the Tangle Lakes and the drainage falls 650 feet in 51 river miles. Several hundred lakes and ponds are scattered throughout the surrounding spruce-dominated forest. Glennallen Field Office Milepost 186.5 Glenn Hwy, P.O. Box 147 Glennallen, AK 99588 (907) 822-3217 www.blm.gov/alaska Visit us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/BLMAlaska Visit us on Twitter at: www.twitter.com/BLMAlaska BLM/AK/GI-88/023+8351+050 REV 2018 Delta Wild and Scenic River Delta Wild and Scenic River Caribou walking uphill from lakes in the Delta River watershed. Adventures on the Delta Wild and Scenic River Season and Climate Plants The river-running season begins in early to mid-June, depending on ice breakup and precipitation. Average annual precipitation measured at Paxson is 11 inches of rain and 120 inches of snow. July is commonly the wettest month. During the summer, temperatures range from 35°F to 70°F, with occasional highs in the 80s. By mid-September, shorter days and colder temperatures bring the river running season to an end. Vegetation ranges from arctic tundra to spruce-poplar forests. Grasses, sedges and forbs grow on the highest, most exposed slopes and above the brush line. Willows grow on moist lowland sites and in the many brushy draws draining the side slopes. History and Prehistory Native people may have lived in this area as long ago as the end of the last ice age (about 10,000 years ago). Approximately 226,660 acres in the Tangle Lakes area are designated as the Tangle Lakes Archaeological District. This area has hundreds of archaeological sites that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The first recorded use of the Delta River was as a route of exploration by the U. S. Army in 1898. A gold strike along Rainy Creek led to the establishment of the Eureka Creek Mining District; as many as 250 people worked in this District between 1900 and 1910. NOTE: Collection or disturbance of any historic or prehistoric remains is against the law. Fishing Tangle Lakes and the Delta River contain grayling, round whitefish, lake trout, burbot and longnose suckers. Most fishing is for grayling, but good lake trout fishing is available in late winter and early spring. Salmon are not found in the Delta River due to the 15-foot-high falls and the heavy silt load entering from Eureka Creek. Dwarf birch occupies drier sites with welldrained soils. Alder grows on steep slopes of hillsides and canyon walls. Forests of white and black spruce grow in small pockets along the river, and on some hillsides below an elevation of 3,200 feet. You will find open spruce-poplar forests on lowland sites along the river and on some midslope hillsides. Understory plants are varied and abundant. Fireweed, bistort, rose, mountain avens, burnet, and shrubby cinquefoil are just some of the many plants in the area. In August, many people travel to Tangle Lakes to pick blueberries. Other harvestable berries in the Delta River area include crowberry

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National Parks
USFS NW