Denali Highway

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Denali Highway (Alaska Route 8) is a lightly traveled, mostly gravel highway in the U.S. state of Alaska. It leads from Paxson on the Richardson Highway to Cantwell on the Parks Highway. Opened in 1957, it was the first road access to Denali National Park (then known as Mount McKinley National Park). Since 1971, primary park access has been via the Parks Highway, which incorporated a section of the Denali Highway from Cantwell to the present-day park entrance. The Denali Highway is 135 miles (217 km) in length.

maps

Travel Map of the 135 miles long Denali Highway in Alaska which connects Paxson on the Richardson Highway with Cantwell Junction on the Parks Highway. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Denali Highway - Travel Map

Travel Map of the 135 miles long Denali Highway in Alaska which connects Paxson on the Richardson Highway with Cantwell Junction on the Parks Highway. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Official visitor map of Denali National Park and Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Denali - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Denali National Park and Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Wrangell - St Elias National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wrangell - St. Elias - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Wrangell - St Elias National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13B (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - GMU 13 B - Moose and Caribou Hunt Restrictions

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13B (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13A (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - GMU 13 A - Moose and Caribou Hunt Restrictions

Map of State Moose and Caribou Hunt Restricted Areas in the Game Management Unit 13A (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Sourdough Controlled Use Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Sourdough Controlled Use Area

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Sourdough Controlled Use Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Paxson Closed Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Paxson Closed Area

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of the Paxson Closed Area in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of Susintna River / Alaska Range East in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Susintna River / Alaska Range East

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of Susintna River / Alaska Range East in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of Susintna River / Alaska Range West in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 13 - Susintna River / Alaska Range West

Federal Subsistence Hunt Map of Susintna River / Alaska Range West in the Game Management Unit 13 (GMU) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Denali Highway https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denali_Highway Denali Highway (Alaska Route 8) is a lightly traveled, mostly gravel highway in the U.S. state of Alaska. It leads from Paxson on the Richardson Highway to Cantwell on the Parks Highway. Opened in 1957, it was the first road access to Denali National Park (then known as Mount McKinley National Park). Since 1971, primary park access has been via the Parks Highway, which incorporated a section of the Denali Highway from Cantwell to the present-day park entrance. The Denali Highway is 135 miles (217 km) in length.
BLM Recreation Guide For more information about the Denali Highway, obtain a copy of the 92-page full-color book Rocks, Ridges & Glaciers: A Geologic Tour Along the Denali Highway. Price $10, available from: Expect to encounter subsistence hunting and harvesting activities along the highway from the beginning of August until the road closes. Before venturing on this road, be sure your vehicle is in good working order. Check your spare tire and make sure you have a jack and lug wrench. Carry extra water and sufficient food for an emergency situation. You cannot predict how long it will take to get help if you become stranded. Limited services are available 20 to 55 miles apart along the Denali Highway. Cell phone coverage is limited. Do not depend on a cell phone for your safety. Travel Tips The Denali Highway is often overlooked by motorists, yet it offers some of the most spectacular scenery and recreational opportunities in Alaska. For those with a heart for adventure and a little extra time, the highway is a historic and archaeological glimpse of the Last Frontier – wilderness in all directions. With planning, an abundance of camping, fishing, wildlife viewing and hiking opportunities can be yours. The Denali Highway, 135 miles long, connects Paxson on the Richardson Highway with Cantwell Junction on the Parks Highway. A loop trip from Fairbanks is 436 miles and a loop trip from Anchorage is about 600 miles. Allow several days. Points of Interest Denali Highway BLM BLM/AK/GI-88/023+8351+050 Rev 2015 www.blm.gov/ak/gfo www.facebook.com/BLMAlaska www.twitter.com/BLMAlaska Visit us on the Internet at: Bureau of Land Management Glennallen Field Office Milepost 186.5 Glenn Hwy P.O. Box 147 Glennallen, Alaska 99588 (907) 822-3217 Glennallen Field Office, Alaska 20 Alaska Range Interpretive Sign MP 95.0/40.0 (Gravel “road” on north side of highway) Points of Interest, continued from previous page 10 Palsa MP 41.0/94.0 (no parking spot) Road construction in 1957 cut into the partially collapsed palsa on the south side of the road and initiated its deterioration. A palsa is a small dome-like frost mound, usually 10 to 20 feet high, containing peat. Closer examination reveals individual ice and peat layers typical of a palsa. 11 Kettle Lakes MP 41.5/93.5 Several small lakes and depressions in this area were formed when chunks of ice broke off retreating glaciers and were buried in the glacial debris. The ice eventually melted, leaving circular-shaped depressions called kettles. 12 Maclaren Glacier Viewpoint, Maclaren River Bridge MP 42.0/93.0 The Maclaren Glacier is about 16 miles north. 13 Crazy Notch MP 46.0/89.0 The Crazy Notch was formed by the actions of ice and water. The Maclaren Glacier once flowed through the Maclaren River Valley and deposited a lateral moraine—a buildup of rocks on the sides of the glacier. Crazy Notch was created when a glacial stream cut through the moraine. The notch acts as a natural snow catchment, closing the Denali Highway in winter with huge snowdrifts. 14 Waterfowl Lakes MP 49.5/85.5 These lakes and ponds are excellent summer habitat for many species of waterfowl and shorebirds. Look for diving and dabbling ducks, geese, grebes and shorebirds. You may also spot bald eagles, moose, caribou, beaver and fox in the vicinity. Look for the interpretive sign on the north side of the road. 15 Clearwater Creek Wayside/Outhouse MP 55.5/79.5 16 Eskers MP 59.0/76.0 You are driving on an esker, a sinuous ridge of silt, sand, gravel and cobbles that were carried and deposited by a stream that flowed within the glacier, confined by walls of ice. When the glacier Canoeing/Floating: Tangle Lakes and the upper Nenana, Delta and Gulkana rivers offer various boating opportunities. Refer to BLM brochures Delta Wild and Scenic River; Gulkana Wild and Scenic River; and Gulkana Wild and Scenic Floater’s Guide. Bicycling: The Denali Highway and trails in the area can be rough and dusty with wet, boggy areas and sharp rocks. Mileposts and many trailheads are not marked. Come prepared with adequate maps, spare parts and repair equipment. Sightseeing: The entire route presents outstanding views of the Alaska Range, boreal vegetation, glacial features and wildlife. Look for caribou, moose, fox, marmot, wolf, ptarmigan, trumpeter swan, and other waterfowl. Fishing: Lake trout and arctic grayling inhabit many lakes and streams. Purchase an Alaska fishing license and view sportfishing regulations on-line at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Web site at http://www.adfg.state.ak.us, or buy in person from license agents throughout the state, including stores in Glennallen, Delta Junction, Tok and Cantwell. Hiking: Bring topographic maps. Most trails are unmarked. Rubber boots are recommended for crossing wet spots. Camping: Permits are not required for noncommercial camping on BLM-administered public lands. All camping is limited to 14 days within a 60day period. BLM campgrounds fill on a first-come, fir

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