Caines Head

State Recreation Area - Alaska

Caines Head State Recreation Area embodies Caines Head cape in Resurrection Bay, Alaska. The area is located in Kenai Peninsula Borough 7 miles (11 km) south of the city of Seward. A popular tourist destination, Caines Head features spruce and hemlock forests, a variety of terrestrial and marine wildlife (including harbor seals, Steller sea lions, sea otters, orcas, humpbacks, grey and fin whales, brown and black bears, lynx, mountain goats, wolves, etc.), and the remains of Fort McGilvray – a World War II-era fortification erected in 1941–1942 to obstruct potential Imperial Japanese Army invasion.

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Map of the Southern Trek part of the Iditarod National Historic Trail Southern Trek (NHT) in Chugach National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Iditarod - Southern Trek

Map of the Southern Trek part of the Iditarod National Historic Trail Southern Trek (NHT) in Chugach National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Official visitor map of Kenai Fjords National Park (NP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Kenai Fjords - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Kenai Fjords National Park (NP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Caines Head SRA https://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/cainesheadsra.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caines_Head_State_Recreation_Area Caines Head State Recreation Area embodies Caines Head cape in Resurrection Bay, Alaska. The area is located in Kenai Peninsula Borough 7 miles (11 km) south of the city of Seward. A popular tourist destination, Caines Head features spruce and hemlock forests, a variety of terrestrial and marine wildlife (including harbor seals, Steller sea lions, sea otters, orcas, humpbacks, grey and fin whales, brown and black bears, lynx, mountain goats, wolves, etc.), and the remains of Fort McGilvray – a World War II-era fortification erected in 1941–1942 to obstruct potential Imperial Japanese Army invasion.
For More Information Kenai/Prince William Sound Area Office PO Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 North Coastal District Office PO Box 1578 Seward, AK 99664 (907) 224-3434 www.alaskastateparks.org Welcome to Resurrection Bay Area Alaska State Parks Welcome Resurrection Bay, with its tranquil turquoise or stormy gray waters, rocky islands, and the rugged mountains and glaciers that surround it, is a perfect example of Alaska’s coastal beauty. Many of Seward’s visitors only see the area’s state parks from a cruise ship, but they are missing out. To really enjoy all this area has to offer, we invite you to get up close and personal. Get your hiking boots, kayak, or boat ready and head out to one of the state park units in Resurrection Bay for an afternoon excursion or weekend adventure. There is a large state recreation area, a small state recreation site, and five state marine parks in Resurrection Bay. Area History The coves and inlets of Resurrection Bay sheltered generations of the Alutiiq-speaking people known as Unegkurmiut. In the late 18th century, many Native people were coerced into hunting valuable sea otters for the Russian-American Company. Soon, cultures blended, the Native population declined, and by the late 19th century most Native villages were abandoned. Since then, Resurrection Bay has been used by gold-seekers on their way to Turnagain, Nome, and Iditarod. Hundreds of railroad workers boosted Seward’s population by 1917. Then, Resurrection Bay experienced a flurry of activity during World War II when the U.S. military constructed fortifications at Caines Head and other points in the bay. Today, you can see glimpses of history from land or water in the Resurrection Bay Area State Parks. Panama gun mount at Rocky Point in Caines Head SRA Seward Harbormaster PO Box 167 Seward, AK 99664 (907) 224-3138 harbormaster@cityofseward.net Marine VHF Channel 17 For emergencies call 911 Derby Cove Creek in Caines Head SRA Photo courtesy of Ben Hagedorn North Fork of Tonsina Creek in Caines Head SRA Photo courtesy of sunnycove.com Alaska State Parks Area Highlights Wave Action Wildlife Boating is popular in Resurrection Bay and is the only way to reach the state marine parks. Most visitors kayak or take a water taxi to these parks, as only Caines Head SRA and Lowell Point State Recreation Site (SRS) have land access. There are no public mooring buoys or docking facilities. Small boats can be pulled up on shore, but should be secured above the high tide line to prevent losing them to tides or rough surf. Resurrection Bay provides important and varied bird habitat, attracting birders from around the world to see Tufted and Horned Puffins, Common Murres, Pigeon Guillemots, Bald Eagles, and Spruce Grouse. Black and brown bears and mountain goats also live in the Resurrection Bay area. Juvenile Black-legged Kittiwake Steller Sea Lions Photo courtesy of Carol Griswold r ’s ke Kaya Humpback Whale near Day Harbor Photo courtesy of Tom Kain Whale watching in Resurrection Bay can be very rewarding, too. Look for spouts and fins of humpback whales and orcas in the bay. Smaller marine mammals such as harbor and Dall’s porpoises, sea otters, and sea lions might upstage them by putting on a show. Varied Thrush (male) Photo courtesy of Carol Griswold Background photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Historic World War II Fort and Garrison Fort McGilvray in Caines Head State Recreation Area (SRA) is the most accessible of Resurrection Bay’s WWII-era fixed defense installations. A short hike from North Beach will take you to these sites. You are welcome to explore the ammunition magazine, base-end station, gun emplacements, and a few other shelters; however, you will need a flashlight. Ruins of a “garrison ghost town” on Caines Head SRA’s South Beach are also accessible by trail, though some of the structures are just off the trail and somewhat hidden by the dense vegetation. These structural remains are dangerous and exploring them is strongly discouraged. If you are boating, you may also explore Rocky Point for remnants of another WWII-era fixed defense installation. ist: heckl rip C Day T Public-Use Cabins Camping in the Resurrection Bay area state parks is a rustic backcountry experience. Each of the five state marine parks allows for beach camping. To protect fragile beach rye grass, please avoid camping on vegetated areas. Thumb Cove SMP has a toilet for kayakers and campers located on the western end of the beach, about 250 feet east of the Porcupine Glacier public-use cabin. There are two public-use cabins (PUCs) in Caines Head SRA—Derby Cove and Callisto Canyon cabins. Both can be accessed by small personal boat, water taxi, or by hiking the Caines Head Trail. Thumb Cove SMP also has two PUCs, Porcupine Glacier and Spruce Glacier cabins, and can be reached by boat. Spruce Glacier PUC is accessed from the beach by a boardwalk. All four cabins have private toilets and nearby creeks pro
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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