"20130724_YUCH_RockOutcrops_KenHill" by National Park Service, Alaska Region , public domain

Chena River

State Recreation Park - Alaska

Chena River State Recreation Area is located east of Fairbanks. The recreation area is centered on the Chena River. Facilities include campgrounds, hiking, ATV, snowmachine and sled dog trails, a shooting range, fishing ponds, and several public-use cabins. Fishing for Arctic grayling is catch-and-release only in the river, but visitors may keep grayling caught in the three stocked ponds. The area is also noted for several concentrations of granite tors. The road through the recreation area ends at the privately owned and operated Chena Hot Springs resort.

maps

Visitor Map of Steese National Conservation Area (NCA) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Steese - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Steese National Conservation Area (NCA) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Chena River SRA https://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/northern/chenariversra.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chena_River_State_Recreation_Area Chena River State Recreation Area is located east of Fairbanks. The recreation area is centered on the Chena River. Facilities include campgrounds, hiking, ATV, snowmachine and sled dog trails, a shooting range, fishing ponds, and several public-use cabins. Fishing for Arctic grayling is catch-and-release only in the river, but visitors may keep grayling caught in the three stocked ponds. The area is also noted for several concentrations of granite tors. The road through the recreation area ends at the privately owned and operated Chena Hot Springs resort.
For More Information: Northern Area Office Park History Thomas and Robert Swan came across Chena Hot Springs in 1905. When local Fairbanks residents learned of this resource, they requested access, and the U.S. War Department built a trail to the hot springs in 1913. Today, part of the Yukon Quest, an annual 1,000-mile sled dog race, is run on the old trail. 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Welcome to C hena R iver State Recreation Area A Park for All Seasons Chena River State Recreation Area (SRA) encompasses 397 square miles of forests, rivers, and alpine tundra. You can hike, bike, dogsled, ski, horseback ride, skijor, snowmachine, 4-wheel, or snowshoe on over 100 miles of maintained trails. Winter Recreation Winter’s cold grip doesn’t put an end to recreational opportunities—instead park users snowmachine, ski, and dogsled on the winter trails. Public-use cabins are spaced so that skiers can reach them in a day, and local mushers use the area to train for dog sled races. Photo co urtesy o f Britt C oon Water Recreation The area around the springs attracted attention from gold prospectors and loggers as well. The Chena River became a central mode of transportation, carrying people to the hot springs and timber to the rapidly growing city of Fairbanks. With the advent of World War II, large numbers of servicemen settled in the Fairbanks area and developed the wild lands. The meandering, class I-II Chena River flows through the park, and is an ideal place for kayaking, canoeing, fishing, swimming, or sunbathing. River access roads (located at mileposts 31.6, 28.6, 28.0, and 27.0) and four bridges provide several choices for launching and ending float trips. Wildlife In 1967, Alaska legislators designated 15,360 acres as the Chena River State Recreation Area. One year later, oil was discovered in Prudhoe Bay and lands were rapidly parceled out and developed. Alaskans fought to preserve the remaining wild lands and their natural resources, and in 1975, 240,000 acres were added to the recreation area. Photo court e sy of Robe rt Ange ll Are you looking for wildlife? Chena River SRA abounds with wildlife including moose, bears, lynx, and a multitude of birds. During winter, snowshoeing is a great way to follow animal tracks along the many accessible trails. Don’t forget your camera! Photo cour tesy of Ro bert Ange ll urtesy of Photo co Angell ngell A f Robert urtesy o Photo co Robert Photo courtesy of Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy Chet Fehrmann of Robert Angell Background photo courtesy of Robert Angell Alaska State Parks For additional information visit www.alaskastateparks.org Chena River SRA Highlights Fishing, Hunting, & Trapping Geologic Formations The Chena River, flanked by panoramic alpine ridges and towering landforms, cuts through this recreation area. The valley is anchored by Chena Dome (4,421 feet) to the north and the granite tors to the south. The granite tors’ weathered, craggy spires of intrusive granite rise above their surroundings. The two-toned Angel Rocks on the east side are the exposed tips of a large granite mass underlying the Chena River area. Enjoy these spectacular formations and breathtaking views from the expansive trail system and throughout Chena River SRA. Photo courtesy of Lucy Baranko Snowmachine & OffRoad Vehicle Use Areas Snowmachiners and off-road vehicle users delight in the abundant riding opportunities in Chena River SRA. Chena River SRA is open to snowmachines in all areas north of the Chena River, west of the south fork valley, and north of the east fork valley when snow depth is adequate to protect underlying vegetation. For information regarding winter openings call the Public Information Center in Fairbanks at (907) 451-2705 or visit www.alaskastateparks.org, under the “Current News” link. Campgrounds Cast a fishing line into the Chena River and there’s a good chance you’ll hook an arctic grayling. Since fishing in the Chena River is catch-and-release only, make sure to gently place the fish back into the water. You can keep fish caught in four ponds along Chena Hot Springs Road. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) stocks ponds at mileposts 30, 42.8, 45.5, and 47.9. An abundance of small game animals bring trappers and hunters to the park during the winter months. Sport hunting within the park includes moose, bear, rabbit, grouse, ptarmigan, and fur bearing animals. Park officials advise sportsmen to familiarize themselves with ADF&G regulations. Photo courtesy of Robert Angell Public-Use Cabins Chena River SRA has eight public-use cabins available by reservation online. Cabins are equipped with plywood sleeping platforms, shelves, a wood stove, kitchen counter, a table and benches, and an outdoor latrine. Located at milepost 27 on Chena Hot Springs Road, the Rosehip Campground is an ideal base camp for exploring Chena River SRA. There are 37 campsites. A handcarry boat l
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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