Denali

State Park - Alaska

Denali State Park is located on the south eastern border of Denali National Park and Preserve formerly known as Mt. McKinley National Park. Alaska’s Highway 3, George Parks Highway, connects Fairbanks and Anchorage and runs directly through Denali State Park. This highway provides access to many different hiking routes and look out points which allow visitors to see Denali and many different parts of the natural environment only found in Alaska. One of these points include Kesugi Ridge in the Peters Hills area. A very popular trail which is known for its incredible views of the Alaska Range and tundra around it. Mount Denali is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation 20,310 feet above sea level. To the east, the state park borders the Susitna River, which feeds into the Gompertz Channel near Anchorage, then into the ocean.

maps

Official visitor map of Denali National Park and Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Denali - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Denali National Park and Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Denali SP https://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/units/denali1.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denali_State_Park Denali State Park is located on the south eastern border of Denali National Park and Preserve formerly known as Mt. McKinley National Park. Alaska’s Highway 3, George Parks Highway, connects Fairbanks and Anchorage and runs directly through Denali State Park. This highway provides access to many different hiking routes and look out points which allow visitors to see Denali and many different parts of the natural environment only found in Alaska. One of these points include Kesugi Ridge in the Peters Hills area. A very popular trail which is known for its incredible views of the Alaska Range and tundra around it. Mount Denali is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation 20,310 feet above sea level. To the east, the state park borders the Susitna River, which feeds into the Gompertz Channel near Anchorage, then into the ocean.
Welcome to Area History Once a bear and caribou hunting ground of the Native Dena’ina people, this slice of wilderness is blessed with striking views of a distant slab of granitic pluton that is the tallest mountain in North America. Established in 1970, Denali State Park encompasses 325,240 acres of land between the Talkeetna Mountains and the Alaska Range. Although Denali itself peaks more than 24 miles away from the boundary of the park, Denali State Park’s unique vantage allows you to see the mountain’s dominating bulk in relation to the surrounding landscape,and offers commanding views of the Alaska Range. Denali is known to the Dena’ina as Dghelay Ka’a, and to the Aleuts as Tralieka. The mountain’s unsurpassed height on Alaska’s landscape marks it with special significance to many Native cultures. For More Information Alaska State Parks Matanuska-Susitna/Copper Basin Area Office 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907)745-3975 Alaska Veterans Memorial Denali State Park Visitors Center and Gift Shop Mile 147.1 George Parks Highway Denali State Park www.alaskastateparks.org Denali or McKinley? Golden Eagle Photo courtesy of M. Herbert www.captivelightuk.com Welcome With the Talkeetna Mountains to the east and the Alaska Range to the west, Denali State Park lays claim to some of the most magnificent views in Alaska. The park is roughly divided in half by the George Parks Highway National Scenic Byway, allowing for breathtaking vistas along the road and easy access to the backcountry. From kayaking the white waters of the Chulitna River to cross-country skiing and snowmachining, Denali State Park offers a wide range of recreational opportunities for all. Denali, “The High One,” looms large and proud on the horizon throughout the park. At 20,320 feet, the peak dominates the towering Alaska Range and is the highest point in North America. Whether you want to spy Denali through the clouds from a drive-in campsite, or hike an alpine ridge in search of that perfect 360° view of Interior Alaska, Denali State Park offers unmatched perspectives of the mountain that serves as its namesake. Until August 30, 2015, the official name for the peak, according to the U.S. Board of Geographic Names, was Mt. McKinley, in honor of William McKinley, the 25th president of the United States. The mountain’s original name (and the one preferred by Alaskans) is Denali, which translates from Koyukon as “The High One.” Starting in 1975, the Alaska State Legislature requested to change the name back to Denali, but it was blocked by representatives from McKinley’s home district in Ohio. After a 40-year procedural stalemate, the mountain is officially known again as Denali. K’esugi Ridge, in Dena’ina means “Ancient One” and was used as caribou hunting grounds. The K’esugi Ken Campground is named after the “low ridge south of K’esugi” that we know today as Curry Ridge. Moose love Photo courtesy of Larry Anderson Red fox Photo courtesy of Phil Pringle Denali View from Veterans Memorial Background photo courtesy of Anne Aleshire Winter camping in Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Jason Nielsen Wolf with lunch Photo courtesy of Seth Schuartz Background photo courtesy of Beverly Demientieff Bull moose Alaska State Parks Public-Use Cabins Highlights Scenic Viewpoints and Camping Perhaps the best roadside view of the Alaska Range is from the Denali View South wayside in Denali State Park. Interpretive panels familiarize visitors with the peaks of the Alaska Range, and nine drive-in campsites offer the chance to wait out the weather for that perfectly clear day. Denali View North offers 20 drive-in camping spots and equally gorgeous views. The Lower Troublesome Creek Campground also provides 20 campsites and is located near the Chulitna River. The Byers Lake Campground, located at the foot of K’esugi Ridge, has 73 campsites and is a great place to relax and take in spectacular views of the lake. The Lakeshore Campground is across the water, about two miles from the loop trailhead, and offers six secluded campsites. Denali State Park has three public-use cabins around Byers Lake. All cabins are equipped with a wood stove, wood bunks, a picnic table, a fire ring, and outhouses. Cabin 3 is wired for electricity, but you’ll have to pack in a generator. To reserve a cabin, go to www.alaskastateparks.org. Hunting and Trapping Alaska Veterans Memorial The park is open to hunting and trapping. Hunters should consult with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regarding applicable hunting rules and regulations. Weapons may not be discharged within one-half mile of a developed facility and the trail around Byers Lake, or within a quarter mile of the Parks Highway between mile 132 and 170. This multi-war memorial honors the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard veterans of Alaska. Each branch is represented by a plaque that shares a short history of their contributions to Alaska. The small visitor information center
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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