Eagle Beach

State Recreation Area - Alaska

Eagle Beach is north of Juneau along the Glacier Highway with views of Lynn Canal, the Chilkat Mountains, and the Juneau Mountains. Eagle River flows through the area. This park unit has 16 primitive sites in the forested section of the park. There are several walk-in camping sites. Large beach and river bars offer excellent beach combing and fishing. Whales, sea lions, and seal frequent the ocean nearby.

maps

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Juneau Ranger District (RD) of Tongass National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Tongass MVUM - Juneau Admiralty 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Juneau Ranger District (RD) of Tongass National Forest (NF) in Alaska. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Eagle Beach SRA https://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/southeast/eaglebeachsra.htm Eagle Beach is north of Juneau along the Glacier Highway with views of Lynn Canal, the Chilkat Mountains, and the Juneau Mountains. Eagle River flows through the area. This park unit has 16 primitive sites in the forested section of the park. There are several walk-in camping sites. Large beach and river bars offer excellent beach combing and fishing. Whales, sea lions, and seal frequent the ocean nearby.
© John Hyde / alaskastock.com For More Information Park Address: Mile 29, Glacier Highway, Juneau, AK Southeast Area Park Headquarters: 400 Willoughby Avenue Juneau, AK 99811-1071 Background photo of Dunlin and Western Sandpiper Courtesy of Chuck Young, USF&WS Alaska State Parks Eagle Beach State Recreation Area surrounds the Methodist Camp. In the early 1950s, a small committee from Juneau-area Methodist churches received a permit to build a camp. Students from across the lower 48 states and local volunteers constructed a small building, tent frames, trails, and bridges and the camp opened in 1955. The camp was established to provide a facility for residents and visitors who want to enjoy the natural environment of southeast Alaska. For additional information visit www.alaskastateparks.org Park History Welcome to Eagle Beach State Recreation Area (907) 465-4563 In 1996, Governor Tony Knowles signed an executive order establishing the 570-acre Eagle Beach State Recreation Area. The Eagle Beach Picnic Area, formerly managed by the U.S. Forest Service, was added to the state recreation area in 2007. In 1996, Governor Tony Knowles signed an executive order establishing the 570-acre Eagle Beach State Recreation Area. The Eagle Beach Picnic Area, formerly managed by the U.S. Forest Service, was added to the state recreation area in 2007. Eagle Beach State Recreation Area surrounds the Methodist Camp. In the early 1950s, a small committee from Juneau-area Methodist churches received a permit to build a camp. Students from across the lower 48 states and local volunteers constructed a small building, tent frames, trails, and bridges and the camp opened in 1955. The camp was established to provide a facility for residents and visitors who want to enjoy the natural environment of southeast Alaska. State Recreation Area (907) 465-4563 Southeast Area Park Headquarters: 400 Willoughby Avenue Juneau, AK 99811-1071 Park Address: Mile 29, Glacier Highway, Juneau, AK For More Information Park History Eagle Beach Background photo of Dunlin and Western Sandpiper Courtesy of Chuck Young, USF&WS © John Hyde / alaskastock.com For additional information visit www.alaskastateparks.org Welcome to Area Highlights Welcome Day-Use Areas Eagle Beach Picnic Area Eagle Beach State Recreation Area, located at the The Eagle Beach Picnic Area can be accessed from encompasses approximately 600 acres and includes a campground, two day-use areas, and an extensive trail system. Hiking, skiing, biking, wildlife viewing, camping, and picnicking are a few of the activities you can enjoy. The main day-use area is fully accessible with a quartermile paved trail and viewing scopes. Several trails and a white sand beach with an expansive intertidal area make for great beach combing and bird and sea life watching. and a covered shelter are available for picnicking near Alaska State Parks Camping The Eagle Beach Campground has 26 campsites, including three walk-in sites. Potable water can be obtained from the campground host site and restroom facilities are available nearby. Outer Beach Area This is a great place for lunch on the beach where you can use the picnic shelter or one of the picnic tables. Enjoy spectacular views of the Chilkat Mountains during lunch and comb the sandy beach for seashells, colorful sea glass, and drift wood afterwards. Watch in spring and fall as they journey north to breeding grounds or south to wintering grounds. Dog owners should be careful not to allow their dogs to harrass the birds. Trails Eagle Beach State Recreation Area has numerous trails for people of all abilities. Take a leisurely stroll along the Loop Trail or spend a day exploring the Amalga Trail that leads to a cabin in the Eagle River Valley. Explore the centerfold map for detailed information about the area’s trails. in e N Eagle River Old Growth Forest wa st o Hi k Ba ee A ma lg Ya n Eagle Beach State Recreation Area ric ig h cier) H (Gla s in T rail ( no al i Follow trail to public-use cabin d) Tongass National Forest tm ain ta Vet eran ’s Me m or Beaver Ponds y Loop rail aT Trail Her b iver Herb e Tid Eagle R Eagle Beach Picnic Area Trail R oa al Flats ke Park Host d Property line h Access Trail er Beac Park boundary Roads Windf all L a Outer Beach Picnic Area LEGEND rt Ri v Favorite Channel Methodist Camp k ree yC da tur Loop Trail Sa Rain Forest Bog (Wetlands) ert Gl ac i er Follow trail to public-use cabin il Tra Parking Restroom out Beach Trail Boy Sc Tidal Flats Picnic shelter a Tid Picnic table l Fl ats Camping Park Host 0 0.25 0.5 Hiking Tid a Boy Scout Camp lF Skiing lat s Accessible Information City and Borough of Juneau Kayak/canoe launch Public-use cabin 0 0.25 0.5 Trail Descriptions Loop Trail Access: Main entrance parking area Travel Means: Foot, wheelchair Distance: 1.8-mile loop Cross the Saturday Creek walking bridge and follow
Welcome to History Long before the Euroamericans set foot in this area, the Tlingit were here. They fished the salmon streams and the many productive inlets, channels, and bays. However, by the 1800s, the local Tlingit were familiar with the newcomers. For More Information Kowee, a Tlingit of the Auk Tribe, responded to George Pilz’s reward offer by showing some gold ore samples. Pilz sent Joe Juneau and Richard Harris with chief Kowee to locate the source of the gold, and by November 1880, the stampede started. www.alaskastateparks.org www.alaskastatetrails.org Southeast Area Office: 400 Willoughby Avenue Juneau, AK 99811-1071 (907) 465-4563 To report an emergency, call 911. Juneau Area Alaska State Parks Juneau grew from a gold-mining boomtown into Alaska’s seat of government. Today, though mining and fishing are still important, government and tourism are the main driving forces of Juneau’s economy. Welcome Juneau Area’s state parks are favorite recreational escapes among local residents, ranging from urban historic sites to roadaccessible recreation areas and marine parks that are accessible only by boat. Attractions include public-use cabins for renting, trails for hiking, skiing, and snowshoeing, campsites for lingering, and scenery for viewing and photographing. There is something for everyone to enjoy, whether you have a half hour, an afternoon, a day, a weekend, or an entire week. Come play in the grand outdoor stage surrounding Juneau, where you might encounter a moose, spot a bear from afar, or pass an Alaskan politician on the trails. Wickersham State Historic Site became Juneau’s first state park in 1984, a fact that illustrates how proud this area is of its role in Alaska’s history. Man identified as Chief Kowee with Tlingit women in Wrangell, Alaska, Copyright 1896 Alaska State Library, p87-0141 Winter and Pond Collection, 1893-1943 Blue mussels at Point Bridget State Park Mist on the peaks of St. James Bay SMP Photo courtesy of Kenneth Gill Background photo: Salt Lake in Ernest Gruening SHP Juneau Area Highlights Wickersham’s House and Collections Public-Use Cabins To say that Alaska State Parks’ rustic public-use cabins in the Juneau area are popular might be an understatement. With six cabins on or near the road system and another five accessible only by water or float plane, there is sure to be one that will pique your fancy and meet your recreational needs. Most are equipped with sleeping platforms or bunks, but no mattresses and are heated with kerosene-burning stoves. Kayaking Wildlife abounds in the Juneau area and the nearby state parks are some of the best places to see these critters. Eagle Beach State Recreation Area is known for fabulous birding opportunities in spring and autumn when large flocks of migratory birds blanket the beach and fill the air. The Juneau area is a kayaker’s dream, with plenty to see and explore from the water. Popular paddling trips include a water trail between Point Bridget and Oliver Inlet with various route options among the Channel Islands. Nearly all the area’s state parks provide fishing opportunities, and where there are fish, bears are sure to follow. Admiralty Island, where Oliver Inlet SMP is located, is especially well known for its large bear population. Check for water availability before you go as you may have to pack water in or treat stream water. Toilets are available near all cabins. Don’t miss out on the fun! You can reserve one of these 11 public-use cabins online at dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/south.htm. Wildlife Viewing Camping The road-accessible Eagle Beach Campground has the most developed camping of all the state parks nearby, with 18 campsites available for use, including three walk-in sites. Potable water can be obtained from the campground host site and toilets are also on site. There are plenty of possibilities for day trips, overnight, multi-day expeditions, and a variety of skill and experience levels. Get your spray skirts ready and head out on the water to enjoy breathtaking views of magnificent glaciers and mountains, narrow fjords, lush forests, numerous islands, and incredible wildlife viewing opportunities, or just paddle out to your favorite beach and relax. Judge James Wickersham (1857-1939) was one of the most influential people in the development of 20th Century Alaska. This house was his home between 1928 and 1939 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The state acquired the house and its contents including furnishings, personal belongings, ethnographic artifacts, and a library containing invaluable archives in 1984. Today, visitors are invited to visit his home. The Wickersham House still contains much of the Judge’s varied collections, allowing visitors the opportunity to get a glimpse of a man who once walked, mushed, and boarded steamers to get around his court circuits—a man who gained a reputation as a just and tireless protector of the people’s rights over the course
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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