Kachemak Bay

State Park & State Wilderness Park - Alaska

Kachemak Bay State Park was the first legislatively designated state park in the Alaska State Parks system. Kachemak Bay State Wilderness Park is the state's only legislatively designated wilderness park. There is no road access to most areas of the park, visitors normally fly in or travel by boat from Homer. Kachemak Bay is considered a critical habitat area due to the biodiversity in the area. Wildlife within the park includes marine mammals such as sea otters, sea lions, and whales, large land mammals such as moose and black bears, and numerous sea and land birds. Terrain consists of both rocky and sandy beaches, dense mountain forests, and higher up, glaciers, and icefields. The park ranger station is located in Halibut Cove Lagoon.

maps

Official visitor map of Kenai Fjords National Park (NP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Kenai Fjords - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Kenai Fjords National Park (NP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Kachemak Bay SP & SWP https://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/kachemakbayswp.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kachemak_Bay_State_Park Kachemak Bay State Park was the first legislatively designated state park in the Alaska State Parks system. Kachemak Bay State Wilderness Park is the state's only legislatively designated wilderness park. There is no road access to most areas of the park, visitors normally fly in or travel by boat from Homer. Kachemak Bay is considered a critical habitat area due to the biodiversity in the area. Wildlife within the park includes marine mammals such as sea otters, sea lions, and whales, large land mammals such as moose and black bears, and numerous sea and land birds. Terrain consists of both rocky and sandy beaches, dense mountain forests, and higher up, glaciers, and icefields. The park ranger station is located in Halibut Cove Lagoon.
Welcome to Park History For More Information Believed to be descended from the Chugach Eskimo, the indigenous inhabitants of this area harvested sustenance from Kachemak Bay’s diverse riches including fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and birds. Archaeological remains show evidence of thriving culture and traditions, but around 500 A.D. these people left the bay; their motives remain undiscovered. However, Kachemak Bay did not remain untapped by humans for long. By the time of European exploration, the area was the territory of the Dena’ina Athabascans. Homer Ranger Station (907) 235-7024 Marine VHF Ch. 16 Kenai Area Office PO Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Kachemak Bay State Park & State Wilderness Park www.alaskastateparks.org www.alaskastatetrails.org Before the establishment of the park, the land “across the bay” was a place of natural beauty, solitude, and recreation for the people of Homer. When Kachemak Bay State Park was designated in June 1970, it became Alaska’s very first state park. People quickly took to the park, making it one of Alaska’s most loved backcountry destinations, and over the years legislative actions added acreage and a wilderness park. Today, there are nearly 400,000 acres of land within the parks, every one of them the result of concerned lawmakers and grassroots citizen action to preserve and protect this marvelous corner of the Alaskan landscape. Welcome Alaska’s first state park and only wilderness park together encompass nearly 400,000 breathtaking acres of mountains, glaciers, forest, coastline, and ocean. The park boasts an unmatched variety of habitats, wildlife, and recreational opportunities including: fishing, hunting, kayaking, beachcombing, camping, and hiking on over 85 miles of trails leading into the backcountry. Go where no road can take you, and set your course for one of the wildest and most remote state parks in the wildest and most remote state. Tutka Lake Background photo Alpine Ridge Photos not otherwise credited are courtesy of Alaska State Parks employees Overlooking Kachemak Bay and Homer Spit Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Grewingk Glacier Lake Photo courtesy of Emily Lochart Beachcombing Paddle Boarding Berry Picking Photography Biking Picnicking Bird Watching Public-Use Cabins Camping Canoeing Kite surfing in Kachemak Bay Photo courtesy of Emily Lochart Packrafting Relaxing Clam Digging Scuba Diving Climbing Skiing Exploring Snowshoeing Fishing Solitude Glacier Traversing Tidepooling Hiking Surfing Horseback Riding Tracking Hunting & Trapping Whale Watching Kayaking Wildlife Viewing On the Water Getting There Public-Use Cabins Access to these parks is by boat or airplane. Air charters, water taxi services, and boat rentals are available in Homer. Check the Kachemak Bay webpage at www.alaskastateparks.org for a list of authorized commercial air and water taxi services. Six public-use cabins located at Halibut Cove Lagoon, Leisure Lake, Moose Valley, and Tutka Bay are available for rent. Reservations can be made up to six months in advance. For reservations and informational fact sheets for each cabin, visit www.alaskastateparks.org. Red squirrel Photo courtesy of Emily Lochart Wildlife Kachemak Bay is a State Critical Habitat Area with estuaries, coves, and fjords that support a myriad of marine wildlife. Rich intertidal zones offer natural classrooms for marine studies. Visitors frequently observe sea otters, harbor seals, porpoises, and various whale species among the waves. On land, you may spot moose, black bears, mountain goats, coyotes, and wolves. Many bird species also inhabit the area, including bald eagles, gyrfalcons, murres, and puffins. Six yurts are available for rent at various locations in Kachemak Bay State Park. A commercial operator maintains and rents these yurts. Each yurt sleeps a maximum of eight people and is equipped with a wood stove. Contact the Homer Ranger Station for more information. China Poot campsite Camping Black bear cubs Photo courtesy of Emily Lochart Always wear a life jacket. The bay can be rough at times. When conditions are poor, be patient as the weather often improves in the evening. Carry food and warm clothing for an unexpected overnight. Marine charts show many of the bay’s hazards and should be carried by all boat operators. Refer to Nautical Chart #16645, Gore Point to Anchor Point. For more information on safe boating, visit www.alaskaboatingsafety.org. Yurt Rentals Photo courtesy of Emily Lochart Sandpipers and dunlin Photo courtesy of Chuck Young/USFWS Tufted puffin pair Photo courtesy USFWS Mountaineering Alaska State Parks Area Highlights Otter eating a crab Photo courtesy of Jill Wheeler Backpacking Coalition Bay yurt Camping is allowed in most areas of the park. Several sites throughout the park have amenities for campers including: fire rings, picnic tables, tent platforms, toilets, and bear-resistant food caches. Check the
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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