Wood-Tikchik

State Park - Alaska

The largest state park in the nation, at 1.6 million acres, Wood-Tikchik State Park was created for the purpose of protecting the area's fish and wildlife breeding and support systems and preserving continued subsistence and recreational activities. The management philosophy is one of non-development and maintenance of the area's wilderness character. Park facilities are rustic and few, with great emphasis placed upon low impact camping and "pack it in, pack it out" practices.
Wood-Tikchik SP https://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/matsu/nancylksra.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood-Tikchik_State_Park The largest state park in the nation, at 1.6 million acres, Wood-Tikchik State Park was created for the purpose of protecting the area's fish and wildlife breeding and support systems and preserving continued subsistence and recreational activities. The management philosophy is one of non-development and maintenance of the area's wilderness character. Park facilities are rustic and few, with great emphasis placed upon low impact camping and "pack it in, pack it out" practices.
Welcome to Area History For More Information Yup’ik people have lived here for hundreds of years, thriving in an area that is renowned for its natural bounty and stunning beauty. Their ÀUVWFRQWDFWZLWK(XURSHDQH[SORUHUVKDSSHQHG around 1818 when the Korsakovsky expedition explored the mouths of the Nushagak and Wood rivers for the Russians. A Russian furtrading post was established in the area that survived until the U.S. purchased Alaska from Russia in 1867 and salmon canneries became more important than fur hunting. Wood-Tikchik State Park and Lake Aleknagik State Recreation Site: P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 wtsp@alaska.gov Wood-Tikchik State Park $WÀUVWWKH1DWLRQDO3DUN6HUYLFHSURSRVHG taking this area under their management EHFDXVHRILWV´PDJQLÀFHQFHµKRZHYHUWKH State of Alaska selected it as a state park. In June 1978, the Alaska State Legislature designated it as Wood-Tikchik State Park, creating the largest state park in the nation. Welcome Wood Tikchik State Park (SP) is the largest state park in the U.S. with nearly 1.6 million acres of some of the most remote and pristine mountains, rivers, glaciers, lakes, tundra, and wetlands in the nation. Lake Aleknagik State Recreation Site (SRS) is on Dillingham’s road system and is a convenient access point to Wood-Tikchik SP as well as a GHVWLQDWLRQIRUUHOD[LQJDQGÀVKLQJ The Wood-Tikchik SP is named for its two systems of large interconnected lakes—the Wood River Lakes and the Tikchik system, which includes the upper Tikchik Lakes and Tikchik River. These ecosystems are biological treasure troves DQGWKHÀUVWFODVVÀVKLQJDWWUDFWVWURSK\VHHNLQJ anglers from the world over. This park’s natural beauty draws adventure seekers and those who simply want to experience the amiable solitude and musical sounds of Alaskan wilderness. It disappoints neither. www.alaskastateparks.org E P R D E A SO SK UR ALA CES Camping along Wind River in view of Kulik Spire Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly A RT ME NT OF NA R TU A L Winter camping in Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Jason Nielsen Top Five 1. 6SHQGDZHHNÁRDWLQJWKH:RRG5LYHU/DNHV Water Trail and camping in the shadow of the Wood River Mountains. 2. Row the tranquil Tikchik River for great ÀVKLQJVWXQQLQJVFHQHU\DQGH[KLODUDWLQJ hikes. 3. View the Lake Kulik ice caves, created by mountain streams eroding the winter’s snow pack along north-facing mountain slopes. 4. Fish for rainbow trout, voracious char, or KDUGÀJKWLQJVDOPRQLQRQHRIWKHÀQHVW VSRUWÀVKHULHVLQWKHZRUOG 5. Paddle Chikuminuk Lake, one of the quietest, most scenic and remote lakes in the park. Background photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Alaska State Parks Highlights Bird Viewing Lake Aleknagik State Recreation Site Lake Aleknagik SRS is the gateway to WoodTikchik SP. This seven-acre parcel has a picnic shelter, toilets, a boat launch, and limited boat DQGÁRDWSODQHDFFRPPRGDWLRQV&RPHVSHQG DGD\ÀVKLQJ/DNH$OHNQDJLNDQGHQMR\DQLFH evening picnic, or launch your expedition into Wood-Tikchik SP. %LUG·V(\H9LHZ Air travel is one of the best ways to see the park. $LUFUDIWRIWHQSURYLGHH[FHOOHQWYLHZVDQGWHUULÀF opportunities to visit many remote areas. A number of air charter companies rent equipment and do drop offs in remote locations in the park. Helicopter landings are prohibited in the park. Woood-Tikchik SP is full of perfect “rest DUHDVµIRUELUGVGXULQJDQQXDOVSULQJDQGIDOO migrations. It also provides ideal nesting and rearing areas for a large variety of birds. Raptors, including eagles, ospreys and a variety of hawks, can be seen congregating near streams and ULYHUVSUH\LQJRQÀVK/RRQVVZDQVJHHVHDQG numerous species of ducks, gulls, shorebirds, owls, and a variety of songbirds keep birders on their toes with binoculars on their nose. Preparation is Key Low-Impact Camping File a trip plan with a friend, your air taxi, or with the Wood-Tikchik SP ranger station. Include all names of those traveling, route, destination, and expected return date. Don’t forget to close the trip plan when you return safely. Camping facilities in Wood-Tikchik are rustic and few, with great emphasis placed on lowimpact camping and ethics. Use established FDPSVLWHVPLQLPL]HFDPSÀUHLPSDFWVDQG properly dispose of waste. • Camp on gravel beaches rather than WKHVHQVLWLYHIRUHVWÁRRUFRYHULQJ • Use gas stoves for cooking, rather than ÀUHZRRG • Deposit solid human waste into sixto eight-inch deep catholes at least 200 feet from any water body. Pack out toilet paper, sanitation wipes, and hygiene products. • Pack out all trash, leftover food, and litter left by others. Bears and other wildlife have an excellent sense of smell and are attracted to garbage. • Leave no visual impact. Disassemble ÀUHULQJVDQGVFDWWHUFROGDVKHVDQG carefully inspect your campsite for litter before leaving. A survival kit is highly recommended for backcountry travelers. Always includ
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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