Pinnell Mountain

National Recreation Trail - Alaska

Sweeping mountain vistas and brilliant wildflower displays under the unceasing light of the midnight sun, the Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail offers an unforgettable experience whether your visit lasts a few hours or a few days. Located approximately 100 miles (161 km) northeast of Fairbanks, this 27-mile (44 km) hiking trail traverses a series of alpine ridge tops entirely above timberline. The Pinnell Mountain Trail is marked with rock cairns as it crosses open tundra with views north to the Yukon River and south to the Alaska Range. Wooden posts along the trail show the mileage from the start at Eagle Summit to the trail's end at Twelvemile Summit. Two shelters provide refuge from storms, but hikers should come prepared for unpredictable, dramatic alpine weather.accessible An accessible interpretive loop trail leads to an observation deck near the Eagle Summit Trailhead.

maps

Visitor Map of Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail (NRT) in the Fairbanks District Office area in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Pinnell Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail (NRT) in the Fairbanks District Office area in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of Steese National Conservation Area (NCA) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Steese - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Steese National Conservation Area (NCA) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Winter Caribou Hunter Access in Fortymile / Steese Highway, Game Management Unit 25C (GMU) area in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 25C - Fortymile Caribou Hunter Access Winter 2020/2021

Map of Winter Caribou Hunter Access in Fortymile / Steese Highway, Game Management Unit 25C (GMU) area in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Federal Subsistence Hunt in the Steese Highway, Game Management Unit 25C (GMU) area in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).GMU 25C - Steese Highway 2020

Map of Federal Subsistence Hunt in the Steese Highway, Game Management Unit 25C (GMU) area in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail (NRT) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Pinnell Mountain - Brochure

Brochure of Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail (NRT) in Alaska. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Pinnell Mountain NRT https://www.blm.gov/visit/pinnell-mountain-trail https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steese_National_Conservation_Area Sweeping mountain vistas and brilliant wildflower displays under the unceasing light of the midnight sun, the Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail offers an unforgettable experience whether your visit lasts a few hours or a few days. Located approximately 100 miles (161 km) northeast of Fairbanks, this 27-mile (44 km) hiking trail traverses a series of alpine ridge tops entirely above timberline. The Pinnell Mountain Trail is marked with rock cairns as it crosses open tundra with views north to the Yukon River and south to the Alaska Range. Wooden posts along the trail show the mileage from the start at Eagle Summit to the trail's end at Twelvemile Summit. Two shelters provide refuge from storms, but hikers should come prepared for unpredictable, dramatic alpine weather.accessible An accessible interpretive loop trail leads to an observation deck near the Eagle Summit Trailhead.
Safety The Trail Offering an escape to a unique and remote section of the Steese National Conservation Area, the Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail winds through a visual feast of sweeping mountain vistas, brilliant wildflower displays, and the unceasing light of the midnight sun. Pinnell Mountain, the highest point along the trail at 4,721 feet (1438 m), was named for Robert Pinnell, who died while climbing nearby Porcupine Dome. The Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail traverses the high ridges between the White Mountains and the Crazy Mountains. Storms moving through the Yukon or Tanana valleys reach this high ground and stall. The results are windy conditions, low clouds, ground fog, rain, hail, or snow. Temperatures can drop below freezing in April, while highs can reach to the middle 80’s in July. Be prepared for snow at any time of the year. The trail is 27 miles (44 km) long and traverses a series of alpine ridge tops that are entirely above timberline. Mileage is measured from Eagle Summit (mile 0) toward Twelvemile Summit (mile 27). Where terrain makes the trail difficult to follow, rock cairns and wooden posts areas indicate the trail. Many parts of the trail require good navigational skills, especially when visibility is poor. There are two shelter cabins located on the Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail. The Ptarmigan Creek Shelter Cabin is located near mile 10.1 (16.2 km) in a saddle just below Pinnell Mountain. The North Fork Shelter Cabin is located at mile 17.8 (28.6 km) on the back side of a hill. These small cabins provide emergency shelter, away from strong wind and blowing rain or snow. They operate on a first-come, first-served basis. Hikers should always have tents and be prepared to use them in case the shelters are occupied. Hikers using the Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail should expect a physical challenge. Most of the trail has at least an 8 percent grade and in many sections the grade exceeds 25 percent. At Eagle Summit, Pinnell Mountain, and Table Mountain, the trail features long switchbacks with 600-foot (182 m) elevation changes over a distance of one-half mile (0.8 km). The Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail is closed to summer use of motorized vehicles, and pets must be under control at all times. All visitors should have detailed USGS maps covering the trail: Circle B-3, B-4, C-3, and C-4. For more information, contact: Bureau of Land Management Eastern Interior Field Office 1150 University Avenue Fairbanks, Alaska 99709-3844 907-474-2200 or 1-800-437-7021 www.blm.gov/ak All of Alaska is bear country. Remember to watch for bears and other wildlife. Cooking should take place outside the shelter cabins so that animals are not attracted to them. Cook food away from sleeping areas and downwind from tents. Always keep a clean camp. Human waste should be buried at least 200 feet (60 m) from water sources, and all garbage, including toilet paper, should be hauled out. Please do not leave food in the cabins for the next people to pack out. Remember – “If you pack it in, pack it out.” Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail BLM Pinnell Mount ain Water is available at both shelter cabins from a catchment system constructed to collect melting snow and rain. All water should be treated before cooking or drinking. Other water sources can be found in small ponds scattered along the trail, and in the early summer, snow may be melted. Carry plenty of water, even if you are only doing a day hike. Arctic Sandwort. (Minuartia arctica) Pink Family. Forms large mats of white, five-petaled flowers. National Recreation Trail Arctic Forget-Me-Not. (Eritrichium aretioides) Borage Family. Bright blue flowers on short, dense clusters of branching stems. Ptarmigan Creek Shelter Cabin. Vegetation Spectacular wildflowers and shrubs are a highlight of hikes along the Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail. Depending on when you visit, many different kinds may be in bloom. Here are just a few of the types of vegetation you will find along the trail. Bistort. (Polygonum bistorta) Buckwheat Family. A spike of bright pink flowers on single stalks with long, pointed leaves. Crowberry. (Empetrum nigrum) Crowberry Family. A mat-forming, evergreen shrub with small, narrow leaves and maroon flowers, producing an edible berry. Frigid Shooting Star. (Dodecatheon frigidum) Primrose Family. Look for drooping, magenta flowers on short, single-stalked plants with large basal leaves. Alaska Arctic Bell Heather. (Cassiope tetragona) Heath Family. A dark green, dwarf shrub with scale-like leaves and white, bell-shaped flowers. Mountain Cranberry. (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) Heath Family. An evergreen mat-forming shrub with glossy, ovoid leaves and pinkish, bell-like flowers that produce an edible berry. Other rock types are visible in different areas along the trail. The area surrounding the North Fork Shelter Cabin is composed of granite. On the eastern side

also available

National Parks
USFS NW