Fort Abercrombie

State Historical Park - Alaska

Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park is on Kodiak Island, Alaska. The park is noted for its historical World War II fortifications and its scenery, which includes bluffs overlooking the ocean, spruce forests, and meadows. The site was named in honor of the early Alaska explorer and United States Army officer Lt. Col. William R. Abercrombie. The fortifications, whose surviving elements include gun emplacements, underground magazines, and foundational remnants of buildings, were built in 1941 and abandoned after the war ended, having seen no action. Park facilities include a campground (best suited for tent camping as the park's narrow and winding roads make RV access difficult), a group camping area, a picnic area, and hiking trails.
Fort Abercrombie SHP http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kodiak/fortabercrombieshp.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Abercrombie_State_Historical_Park Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park is on Kodiak Island, Alaska. The park is noted for its historical World War II fortifications and its scenery, which includes bluffs overlooking the ocean, spruce forests, and meadows. The site was named in honor of the early Alaska explorer and United States Army officer Lt. Col. William R. Abercrombie. The fortifications, whose surviving elements include gun emplacements, underground magazines, and foundational remnants of buildings, were built in 1941 and abandoned after the war ended, having seen no action. Park facilities include a campground (best suited for tent camping as the park's narrow and winding roads make RV access difficult), a group camping area, a picnic area, and hiking trails.
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Welcome to For More Information Kodiak District Office 1400 Abercrombie Drive Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 www.alaskastateparks.org dnr.pkskodiak@alaska.gov Kodiak History “Alaska State Parks” on Facebook Kodiak Area Alaska State Parks For at least 7,500 years, the Kodiak Archipelago has been home to the Alutiiq people, who depend on its natural abundance. Russian traders, drawn to Alaskan waters by huge sea otter populations, established their first permanent settlement in North America at Three Saints Bay in 1784. This settlement, near the present-day village of Old Harbor, moved to the site of present-day Kodiak in 1792 and became the center of Russian fur trading. Sea otter populations dwindled due to overhunting, and Russia lost interest in its American claims, eventually selling Alaska to the United States in 1867. Welcome Alaska’s “emerald isle” is just as verdant and striking as its name suggests, and visiting Kodiak’s state parks will reveal some of the best parts of its natural splendor. The remote parks: Shuyak Island State Park (SP), Afognak Island State Park, and Woody Island State Recreation Site (SRS), offer secluded getaways, backcountry fishing and hunting, and untouched wilderness. Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park (SHP) includes the ruins of a WWII-era Army installation, within a deep spruce forest surrounded by one of the island’s most scenic coastlines. Buskin River SRS and Pasagshak River SRS offer some of the best fishing on Kodiak. Wherever you end up, you’re sure to have an experience you’ll never forget. You just haven’t seen Alaska until you’ve seen Kodiak. The effects of World War II on Kodiak can still be seen at Fort Abercrombie SHP and Buskin River SRS, which were fortified as part of a coastal defense system. Kodiak was hit hard by the 1964 Good Friday Earthquake and tsunami that destroyed much of the waterfront and business district, and wiped out the villages of Old Harbor and Kaguyak. Today, Kodiak is the center of a commercial fishing industry and a unique draw for explorers who want to experience some of the best Alaska has to offer. Background photo: Katmai coast from Shuyak Island SP Background photo: Light, mist, and trees at Fort Abercrombie SHP Photo courtesy of Lisa Hupp Photo courtesy of Steve Neel Alaska State Parks Wildlife Area Highlights The Kodiak Archipelago is home to many kinds of wildlife, ranging in size from the little brown bat to the famous Kodiak brown bear. The Kodiak bear is the only large mammal native to the island, but in the past century, Sitka black-tailed deer, mountain goats, and reindeer have been successfully introduced. Afognak Island has a healthy population of introduced Roosevelt elk that occasionally swim across to Kodiak Island. Humpback, fin, gray, and killer whales frequent these waters, and other aquatic mammals, such as harbor seals, sea lions, and sea otter can be seen along the coastline. There are also tremendous birdwatching opportunities, with over 95 species frequenting Fort Abercrombie SHP alone. On the Water Fishing and Hunting tos middendorffi) with Kodiak bear (Ursus arc er to courtesy of Greg Wilk The waters around Kodiak are renowned for their great fishing, and Kodiak’s state parks offer great places to land your catch. At Pasagshak and Buskin River you can fish for Dolly Varden, sockeye, pink, chum, and silver salmon. If you want to avoid the crowd, Fort Abercrombie has great lake fishing, and all the remote parks have great fishing spots if you’re willing to look. salmon Pho ary ice, National Digital Libr U.S. Fish & Wildlife Serv Laura Lake Cabin at Afognak Island SP Lagoon Loop at Shuyak Island SP Picking blueberries at Fort Abercrombie SHP Photo courtesy of Dake Schmidt Always wear a life jacket. The waters around Kodiak Archipelago are cold and can be rough at times. When conditions are poor, be patient. Carry emergency communication and signaling devices on your person, plus food, water, and spare clothing for unexpected delays. File a float plan with family or a close friend describing your trip plan, boat, gear, and the size of the party. For more information on safe boating, visit www.alaskaboatingsafety.org. Shuyak Island SP and Afognak Island SP are popular with hunters looking to test their skills. Licenses are required for all hunting. Please consult current Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulations at www.adfg.alaska.gov before you begin your trip. Mulcahy View Cabin at Shuyak Island SP Be Bear Aware Kodiak is bear country. Even if you don’t see a bear, you’ll never be far from one. Bears are curious, intelligent, and potentially dangerous animals, but undue fear of bears can endanger both bears and people. By following these guidelines, you can avoid a risky encounter. A park naturalist teaches about the colorful and diverse wildlife in the intertidal zone. Photo courtesy of Jack Ransom • Avoid surprising bears; look for signs of bears and make plenty of noise
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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