Kenai River

Special Management Area - Alaska

Over 105 linear miles the river and lakes are managed by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources as the Kenai River Special Management Area, from four miles inland of the river mouth at Cook Inlet, to 82 miles upstream. Adjacent to the management district are fifteen different parks.

maps

Official visitor map of Lake Clark National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lake Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lake Clark National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Kenai River SMA http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/units/kenairiv.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenai_River Over 105 linear miles the river and lakes are managed by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources as the Kenai River Special Management Area, from four miles inland of the river mouth at Cook Inlet, to 82 miles upstream. Adjacent to the management district are fifteen different parks.
For More Information Kenai/Prince William Sound Area Headquarters and Ranger Station Morgans Landing State Recreation Area (907) 262-5581 DNR Public Information Center 550 W 7th Ave., Suite 1260 Anchorage, Alaska 99501 (907) 269-8400 Archaeologists search for artifacts to uncover the history of the people who lived here hundreds and thousands of years ago. Photos courtesy of Debbie Corbett, USFWS (above) and Dan Thompson (right) Welcome to Fishing the Kenai Kenai River Special Management Area Kenai River Special Management Area P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, Alaska 99669 www.alaskastateparks.org Welcome Welcome to the Kenai River Special Management Area (SMA). This is Alaska’s largest sport fishery, world renowned for its record-sized Chinook salmon. The Kenai River is an angler’s paradise, boasting all five species of Pacific salmon and large rainbow trout. All in all, 36 different species of fish, call the mighty Kenai River home. Fish and anglers aren’t the only ones who benefit from the remarkable Kenai; bald eagles, caribou, trumpeter swans, moose, and bears are just a few of the inhabitants that make the Kenai River a prime location for watchable wildlife. This brochure is paid for, in part, by the Kenai River Sportfishing Association Area History The Kenai River has attracted people for thousands of years. The earliest archeological sites were occupied between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago, not long after glaciers receded from the area. Intensive salmon fishing began at least 2,000 years ago by the Riverine Kachemak and later by the Kenaitze Dena’ina. Both cultures were not only attracted by salmon, but also offshore fish, moose, and caribou. The river continues to provide food for local people, other Alaskans, and the world. The Kenai River offers an abundance of options for anglers: bank fishing, back trolling, drifting, back bouncing, catch-and-release, personaluse dipnetting, subsistence fishing, and guided fishing are just some of the opportunities available in the fishery. Different methods are popular in different river reaches—don’t buck the trend. Drift fishing through back trollers or back bouncing where others are drifting is a recipe for tangled lines, hot tempers, and accidents. Angling in the Kenai can be orderly if everyone works together and employs the same methods. Your Fellow Fishers Fishing Regulations Landing a salmon on the Kenai is challenging enough without worrying about the crowds. Help out other anglers with a “fish on” by pulling in your line and steering your boat out of the way. The universal signal for “fish on” is an upraised landing net. The river is for everyone; there is no such thing as a personal fishing hole. Courtesy and common sense make everyone’s experience more enjoyable. Fishing regulations may change annually or by emergency order at any time in the season. Check for regulation updates before fishing at www.adfg.alaska.gov. Fishing the Kenai Photo courtesy of Kenai River Sportsfishing Association Kenai River SMA was established in 1984 in response to increasing usage and strain on the river system’s health. The SMA contains more than 105 miles of rivers and lakes and is adjacent to 16 publicly managed parks that offer prime opportunities for boating, camping, wildlife viewing, and, of course, fishing. Complete your harvest records immediately for Chinook salmon. In the personal use fishery, you must record the catch and clip the tail prior to leaving the fishing site or concealing your catch from plain view. Designated riverbanks are seasonally closed in order to conserve sensitive riparian habitat for fish and wildlife. Caring for Your Catch Dipnetting on the Kenai Photo courtesy Debbie Delker Background image is a composite Photos courtesy of Kenai River Sportsfishing Association Fishing the Kenai Fish experience shock when caught, so treat fish carefully if you intend to release them. Remove the hook while the fish is underwater. If the hook cannot be removed, cut the line near the hook. An exhausted fish may need time to recover before it can swim. Cradle your catch underwater and gently move it back and forth while pointing upstream. If you’re keeping your catch, care for it by cutting the gills to bleed it and keeping it in cold water. Background photo courtesy of Kenai River Sportsfishing Association Fishing in the fog at Eagle Rock, Kenai River Photo courtesy of Fitzgerald Photography Winter camping in Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Jason Nielsen Alaska State Parks Kenai River Guides Identifying Fish of the Kenai River guides provide a safe and easy way to get out on the Kenai for both beginners and experienced anglers. If you use a guide service, be sure they are registered with State Parks and that the vessel has current Kenai River Guide decals and a three-digit guide number. A list of permitted guides is available at the Gilman Center (907-714-2470) in Soldotna. Fish of the same species can differ in color depending on
For More Information: Visit us online at Alaska is big, wild, and scenic, www.alaskastateparks.org with a state park system to match. Encompassing Area Offices over 3.3 million acres of rugged, unspoiled terrain, the Alaska State Park System provides endless recreational opportunities year-round, and is a priceless resource for residents and visitors alike. Chugach State Park Potter Section House 18620 Seward Hwy. Anchorage, AK 99516 (907) 345-5014 Northern 3700 Airport Way Fairbanks, AK 99709 (907) 451-2695 Kenai/PWS P.O. Box 1247 Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 262-5581 Southeast 400 Willoughby Ave. P.O. Box 111070 Juneau, AK 99811 (907) 465-2481 Kodiak District 1400 Abercrombie Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-6339 Wood-Tikchik State Park P.O. Box 1822 Dillingham, AK 99576 (907) 842-2641 Mat-Su/Copper Basin 7278 E. Bogard Road Wasilla, AK 99654 (907) 745-3975 DNR Public Information Centers Anchorage: (907) 269-8400 Fairbanks: (907) 451-2705 Welcome to Alaska State Parks Recreation From high alpine tundra to temperate rainforests, the state’s diverse landscapes are reflected in the parks, historic sites, recreation areas, trails, preserves, and special management areas that comprise the Alaska State Park System—a collection of 123 units Wood-Tikchik State Park Photo courtesy of Bill Berkhahn ranging in size from the half-acre Potter Section House State Historic Site to the 1.6-million-acre Wood-Tikchik State Park. Morgan’s Landing State Recreation Area Denali State Park Photo courtesy of Erik Schlimmer Recreational opportunities are equally varied: hike through fields of lupine; pick blueberries under the midnight sun; snowmachine in Denali country; observe a pod of orcas from your sea kayak; or fish the world-famous Kenai River. Alaska State Park units are an essential component of the Alaskan lifestyle, with locals participating in wilderness recreation at a rate twice that of the national average. Alaskans make up over two-thirds of the 5.4 million annual visitors to our parks. Outdoors is “where it’s at” in the last frontier, and with a square mile of land for every resident, we have plenty of room for you to find your Alaska! The Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation provides outdoor recreation opportunities and conserves and interprets natural, cultural, and historic resources for the use, enjoyment, and welfare of the people. Harding Lake State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Nicole Phillips 3rd Edition—2016 Rock ptarmigan, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Leanne Quirk Background, Hatcher Pass Management Area Photo courtesy of Matthew Johnson Chena River State Recreation Area Shrimping in Prince William Sound Eagle River Nature Center, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Ricketts Rafting Photo courtesy of Mary Wasche Photo courtesy of Jim Wood A Division of the Department of Natural Resources Camping History & Culture Historic preservation is embedded in the Alaska State Parks’ mission statement. Our uniquely Alaskan State Historical Parks (SHP) and State Historic Sites (SHS) represent several eras of Alaska’s history and are as diverse as the places in which they reside: tour a hard-rock gold mining camp at Independence Mine SHP in Palmer; explore a WW II Army artillery base at Fort Abercrombie SHP in Kodiak; or view Tlingit and Haida designs on the totem poles and the clan house at Totem Bight SHP in Ketchikan. Pitch a tent in the backcountry or slide your RV into a drive-in slip. With over 2,500 campsites and limitless backcountry settings, there is no shortage of camping options in Alaska State Parks. Explore the map inside for a list of developed campgrounds. Birch Lake State Recreation Site Big Delta State Historical Park Eklutna Lakeside Trail, Chugach State Park Public-Use Cabins Rupe Andrews Cabin, Alaska State Parks offers Shelter Island State Marine Park more than 60 public-use cabins for rent year-round. These coveted cabins are booked months in advance, so make your reservation today! For more information visit http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/cabins/index.htm. Kachemak Bay State Park Photo courtesy of Andre Kaeppele Wickersham State Historic Site Johnson Lake State Recreation Area Wood-Tikchik State Park Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wayde Carroll Willow Creek State Recreation Area Photo courtesy of Donna Quante Chena River State Recreation Area Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Kyle Joly Photo courtesy of Wanda Scholze Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Dan Kehlenbach Crow Pass Trail, Chugach State Park Photo courtesy of Justin Wholey Trails Totem Bight State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Mary Kowalczyk Background photo courtesy of Donna Olson Fort Rousseau State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Nicole Acevedo Independence Mine State Historical Park Photo courtesy of Wayne Biessel Alaska State Parks boasts an unrivaled multiuse

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