Verde River Greenway

Paddle Map 2

brochure Verde River Greenway - Paddle Map 2
In 1984 the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act established the portion of the Verde River from Beasley Flat downstream to the confluence with Red Creek, as Arizona’s only Wild and Scenic River. While it may appear calm at many of the river access points, the large number of wrecked canoes that have been removed from the Verde River testify to the fact that it has its share of hazards. Please plan ahead, be prepared, and practice Leave No Trace ethics to leave the Verde just as you find it for those who come after. 1 Mile -0.3 Verde River Scenic Area. This is the beginning of the Verde River Scenic Area. The group size on this section of river is limited to 25 people. There are rapids ranging from Class I to Class IV. The ratings given in this guide are for low water (below 1,000 cfs). Mile 0.0 Beasley Flat River Access Point and Picnic Area. The facilities here include a concrete boat ramp, a parking lot, toilets, a changing room, and ramadas with picnic tables and barbecue grills. Mile 0.5 Camp (Capacity 25). This camp is on river left with a large gravel beach. Mile 0.7 Trail Access Point. The Cavates Trailhead is approximately ½ mile from the river on river left. This trailhead is accessible from Forest Road 9242. Mile 1.7 Off the Wall Rapid (Class II). In this rapid, the water goes over a rock bar and then pushes current into a rock wall on river right. The Scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 1.9 Camp (Capacity 25). This sand and bedrock camp is on river left. Mile 2.3 Trail Access Point. The Falls Trailhead is 1/10 of a mile from the river on river left. This trailhead is accessible from FS road 9244. The Ladders Trail #16 is approximately 1¼ mile from the river on river right. This trail is accessible from Forest Road 9709. This area is in Eagle Habitat, so roads are closed from December 1 to June 30. Mile 2.3 No Stop Zone. This is the beginning of a No Stopping Zone for Eagle Habitat. This area, which ends at mile 4.3, is closed to stopping from December 1 to June 30. Mile 2.4 Pre-Falls Rapid (Class III). The river splits above this rapid and the right channel goes through trees to bypass it. The left channel pours over a three-foot ledge creating a sometimes-sticky hole. The Scout for this rapid is from the left bank, stopping well above the rapid. Mile 2.5 Verde Falls Rapid (Class IV). The water pours over an 8-foot ledge into a narrow bedrock channel where there is a large rock in the middle of the channel just below the pour over. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank, stopping well above Pre-Falls Rapid. 2 3 Mile 4.1 Rock Garden Rapid (Class II). This rapid is a ¼ mile long series of rocky drops. The rocks get larger and the drops a little steeper as you progress. The Scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 4.3 End of No Stop Zone. This is the end of the No Stopping Zone for Eagle Habitat, which is closed from December 1 to June 30. Mile 4.5 Camp (Capacity 25). This camp on river left has a sandy landing. Mile 4.8 Palisades Rapid (Class III). This rapid has a long rocky entry at low water. The water eventually funnels to the right and pours over a rock bar before hitting the rock wall on the right. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 4.9 Camp (Capacity 25). This camp has a large sand beach and is located just below Palisades Rapid on river left. Mile 6.5 Bull Run Rapid (Class III). The water in this rapid runs over a gravel bar towards a 2-foot ledge on the right side of the rapid. At high water the two large boulders below the rapid become holes on either side of the channel. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 6.7 Camp (Capacity 6). This small camp on river right has a sand beach in a dry wash. There are cliff walls on both sides and a sycamore tree near the landing. Mile 7.1 Turkey Gobbler Rapid /Punk Rock (Class III). At the bottom of the rapid, there are two large rocks (the larger of which is punk rock). The water goes over and through these rocks, making a hole at higher water. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 7.5 Trail Access Point. Towel Creek Trail (#67) is approximately seven miles from the river on river left. This trail is accessible from Forest Road 708. Mile 8.0 Camp (Capacity 15). This sand and gravel beach across from the Gap Creek Trail has a large sycamore tree in the center of it. Mile 8.1 River Access Point. On river right is the Gap Creek Trail. This is a short steep trail to a parking area approximately ¼ mile from the river. This trail and parking area can be accessed by Forest Road 574. 4 5 Mile 8.4 Bushman Rapid (Class III). In this rapid, the water flows down a rock bar and then turns right as it piles into a rock wall on river left. After the turn, there are ledges or holes on the left side of the channel. Some water also flows through trees to the right of the rapid. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 8.5 Camp (Capacity 10). This camp has a sand beach and is on river right just below Bushman Rapid. Mile 9.0 Camp (Capacity 15). This is a large sand beach camp on river left. Mile 9.1 Big Pink Rapid (Class III). This rapid is very rocky at low water. The water goes through a series of rocks, funneling towards a large pink rock at the bottom of the rapid. This rock becomes a large hole at high water. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 9.6 Black Hole Rapid (Class III). This rapid is very rocky at low water. It has a bedrock ledge at the bottom of the rapid that becomes a hole at high water. There is a long channel on the left with some trees in it that bypasses the rapid. At low water, most of the water goes down the left channel. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 10.1 White Flash Rapid (Class II). In this rapid the river turns right as it goes around the white rock wall on the left. The waves coming off of the bottom left wall become a hole at high water. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 10.2 Camp (Capacity 25). This camp is an elevated sand beach on river right just below White Flash Rapid. Mile 10.4 No Stop Zone. This is the beginning of a no stopping zone for Eagle Habitat. This area is closed to stopping from December 1 to June 30. Mile 11.0 Trees. There are both left and right channels going around and through these trees. Mile 11.8 End of No Stop Zone. This is the end of the No Stopping Zone for Eagle Habitat, which is closed from December 1 to June 30. Mile 12.1 Trees. The river turns left and goes through trees into a narrow channel with waves on the left side. 6 7 Mile 13.7 Trees. There is a tree on river left with a limb overhanging the water. Mile 14.8 Camp (Capacity 15). This camp is on river right with a sand and gravel beach. Leave No Trace The intent of “Leave No Trace” is simple; when your group utilizes one of the beaches in the river corridor as a picnic area or campsite, it is the responsibility of your group to leave that site as clean or cleaner than you found it For more detailed information see www.LNT.org Sanitation / Human Waste: Urinate directly into the river. Urine deposited on land has a strong odor and can attract insects. Urine on wet sand can encourage algae growth. The removal of solid human waste is mandatory for all boating groups. Campfires: Protect river beaches by containing all campfires, coals, and ash within a fire pan. Burn charcoal instead of wood for cooking purposes. Wood collection is restricted to dead and down material only. Cutting or stripping limbs from live trees is prohibited. Burn your fire down to white ash, let it cool, and pack out all remnants of the fire. Kitchens: Pack it in, pack it out! If you smoke, dispose of your cigarette butts properly. Items such as tin cans, aluminum foil, and glass are not burnable and must be packed out. Dispose of wastewater into the main rive current. This includes bathing and dishwashing water as well as liquids from canned foods and beverages Breaking Camp: It is very important to naturalize the campsite before you leave. Disperse wood piles, rocks used to stabilize tents, etc. Pick up all microtrash. Check the area to make sure you have left nothing behind. Leave the camp as if no one had been there. Leave What You Find: Removing potsherds or other artifacts from cultural sites is against the law. Do not touch any rock art such as pictographs and petroglyphs. The oils and acids in our hands can cause deterioration of the site. Respect Wildlife: Quiet groups see more wildlife; both on the river and in camp. Bald eagle nesting areas are quiet zones. It is important not to stop within line of sight of the nests. An adult eagle that is disturbed and flies from it’s nest cannot protect eggs or eaglets from heat or predators. Fishing line kills and maims wildlife, especially raptors. Please help out the creatures of the canyon by disposing of any fishing line you come across. Be Considerate Of Others: Thoughtful users are considerate of other boaters and recreational users by respecting their “space”. Communicating with other river parties when you meet them can minimize congestion at the put-in, take-outs, attractions sites, and on the river. Mile 15.9 Ranch House. On river right there is a ranch house made from river rock. Walt Randel, one of the original ranchers in the area, had four sons who built the house in 1939. 8 9 Mile 16.2 Trees. There are trees in the entry to the channel on river right. Mile 16.3 Verde Hot Springs. This hot springs on river right was a hotel built in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s. A Cherokee Indian named Ben Copple was the caretaker of the hotel. Ben was also the guide of southwestern author Zane Grey. The Hotel burned down on Christmas Eve in 1958. What remains are concrete sidewalks, two palm trees, retaining walls, and two hot tubs; one in a small rock building, and the other outside. Mile 17.1 Childs Power Plant. This historic hydroelectric power plant on river left began producing power in 1909, and was dismantled in 2005. The majority of the power was used to power mining operations in nearby Jerome Arizona. Construction of the plant and the road leading to it began in 1906, and took 600 men (most of them Apache and Mojave Indians), 150 wagons, and 450 mules. Mile 17.2 Childs River Access Point. Access to the river here on river left is by Forest Road 502. Facilities include a campground and toilets. Mile 17.3 Childs Play Rapid (Class II). The water goes through some trees at the entry to this rapid, and then opens up to some waves below. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 17.7 Verde Wild River Area. This is the beginning of the Verde Wild River Area and the entry to the Mazatzal Wilderness. This is a very remote area, so plan ahead and be prepared. Group size is limited to twelve people. Mile 18.2 Baby Snaggle-Tooth Rapid (Class II). In this rapid the water funnels to the left, with a wave at the bottom of the funnel. There is a large rock just left of the center of the channel at the bottom of the rapid. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 18.3 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river left has a sand beach. Mile 18.4 Little Drop Rapid (Class II). There are boulders on the right side of this rapid after the water pours over a rock at the top. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. 10 11 Mile 20.5 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right has a rocky landing and a short walk to a sand beach. Mile 20.8 Trail Access Point. One and a half miles up from the Verde confluence, Fossil Creek intersects the Dead Man Mesa Trail #17. Mile 21.0 Camp (Capacity 12). This sand and gravel beach is on river right. It is difficult to see from the water and has a steep and brushy landing. Mile 21.2 Nasty Little Dog Leg Rapid (Class III). The entry to this rapid is very rocky at low water. The water goes over a rock bar into the right bank, where there are trees and rocks, and makes a sharp turn to the left. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 21.6 Gnarly Little Rock Bar Rapid (Class II). There is no longer a low water run in this rapid as most of the water is diverted down the steep unrunable side channel on river left above it. It is very rocky and typically requires boat dragging. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 21.8 Dog’s Foot Rapid (Class III). In this rapid the water pours over and around several large boulders. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 21.9 Camp (Capacity 12). This large sandy beach is on river left. Mile 22.0 No Stop Zone. This is the beginning of a No Stopping Zone for Eagle Habitat. This zone is closed to stopping from December 1 to June 30. Mile 22.9 End of Eagle Habitat No Stop Zone. Mile 23.3 Rockin Center Rapid (Class II). Here the river turns to the right, then pours over a bedrock ledge with a large rock just right of center. The Scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Mile 23.6 Camp (Capacity 8). Behind the brush at this lagoon, there is a small camp. Mile 24.2 Trail Access Point. On river left, at the confluence with the East Verde River, you can access the Verde River Trail # 11. From here, it is approximately eight miles north to the trailhead near Strawberry, and approximately sixteen miles south to Sheep Bridge. 12 13 Mile 24.3 Camp (Capacity 8). Across from the confluence of the East Verde River is a small sand and gravel beach. Mile 24.4 The river splits into two channels here; the left channel is open the right is full of trees, and dries up at low water. Mile 25.7 Trail Access Point. From the confluence of Houston Creek and the Verde River, it is one and a half miles up the Houston Creek Trail to road #16. Mile 25.8 Camp Capacity 10). This sand beach on river left has some willow trees in the center that may provide some shade. Mile 26.7 Bootlegger’s Cabin. Jim Huffman built this small, dilapidated log cabin, hidden in the mesquite trees on river right. He lived there in the days of prohibition, making bootleg whiskey. The well next to the cabin was hand dug by pioneer cowboy Bill Helm. Mile 26.9 Shoots and Ladders Rapid (class III). At low water, the water pours over a large rock in the center of this rapid, forming some large waves. At high water, the current runs over a rock bar and pushes into a rock wall on the left, forming large waves at the bottom. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 27.2 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp has a sand and gravel beach and is on river right. Mile 27.5 Water Gauging Station. This water gauging station on river right is an authorized Wilderness intrusion. Mile 27.7 Red Wall Rapid (class II). In this rapid the water drops down a long open channel, and runs straight into a cliff wall as it turns left. The scout for this rapid is on river left. Mile 28.1 Trees. Here the river enters a narrow channel with trees on both sides. At the bottom of the channel there are overhanging tree limbs on the left. The scout for this is from the right side of the channel. Mile 28.4 Warm Springs. Warm water flows fifteen feet down to the river. Please resist the temptation to modify this natural feature. 14 15 Mile 29.3 Camp (Capacity 8). This camp on river left has a sand and rock beach and a rocky landing. Mile 29.6 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right is a small sand beach with shrubs. Mile 30.7 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river left has a large sand beach near a cliff wall. Mile 32.3 Trail Access Point. The Verde River Trail # 11 crosses the river here. Mile 32.9 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right has a large sand beach near a big rock. 1. Group size is limited to no more than twenty-five people on the Verde Scenic River section (Beasley Flat to Childs) and no more than twelve people on the Verde Wild River section (Childs to Red Creek). 2. Overnight raft trips must have a fire pan in their possession. Selfsupporting kayak trips must have a fire pan in their possession. Any open fires must be contained within a fire pan. 3. Wood collection is limited to dead and down material only. Cutting or stripping limbs from trees is strictly prohibited. 4. All trips must possess a portable toilet system to collect all solid human waste for proper disposal at an appropriate waste facility. All solid human waste must be carried out of the river corridor (including toilet paper and personal hygiene items). 5. Possession or transportation of any part of native plants is prohibited. 6. Littering is strictly prohibited. Pack out all food remains, and trash (orange peels, seed shells and cigarette butts are considered litter). 7. The U.S. Coast Guard recommends use of Type III or Type V Personal Flotation Device by each person, on all watercraft. 16 17 Mile 33.8 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right has a rocky landing with a fifty-foot trek to a sandy beach. Mile 35.2 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right has a large sand beach. Mile 35.9 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river left has a large rock and sand beach. Mile 36.8 Trees. Here the river runs into the right bank where there are some overhanging trees that have some underwater limbs extending into the current. Mile 36.9 No Stop Zone. This is the beginning of a No Stopping Zone for Eagle Habitat. This zone is closed to stopping from December 1 to June 30. Mile 37.6 Trees. The river narrows here and there are overhanging trees from both right and left banks. Mile 38.1 End of Eagle Habitat No Stop Zone. Mile 39.0 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river left has a sand and rock beach. Stream Flow and Snow Pack Information If you have any questions about the Verde Wild and Scenic River please contact the Tonto National Forest River Permit Coordinator’s office at (928) 402-6236, or the Coconino National Forest’s River Ranger’s office at (928) 203-7503. Information regarding current stream flows, and snow pack, relevant to the Salt River may be accessed by calling the Salt River Project at (602) 236-5929, or logging on to the following websites. US Geological Survey: http://az.waterdata.usgs.gov/az/nwis/current/?type=flow Scroll down to Verde River Near Camp Verde Az and Verde R Blw Tangle Creek, Abv Horseshoe Dam. National Water and Climate Center (snow): http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/snotel/ 18 19 Mile 40.1 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right is a sand beach with a bedrock landing. It has some willow trees that may provide some shade. Mile 40.5 Trail Access Point. The Verde River Trail #11 crosses the river here at the confluence with Red Creek. This is the end of the Verde Wild River Area. Mile 40.6 Red Creek Rapid (Class II). This is a longer than average rapid that is very rocky at low water. Scout this rapid from the right bank. Mile 42.5 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river right has a large sand beach, and is difficult to spot because it is elevated from the river. The landing is very steep with swift moving current. Mile 44.0 Dry Run Rapid (Class III). At high water the water runs over and through bedrock boulders. At low water it goes around these boulders to the right. The scout is from the right bank. Mile 44.2 Camp (Capacity 10). This camp is on river right below Dry Run Rapid, and has a sand beach that is elevated from the river. It has some willow trees that may provide a little shade. Mile 44.3 Camp(Capacity 12). This camp has a large sand beach on river left. “No servant brought them meals… No traffic cop whistled them off the hidden rock in the next rapids. No friendly roof kept them dry when they misguessed weather or not to pitch the tent. No guide showed them which camping spots offered a night long breeze and which a nightlong misery of mosquitoes; which firewood made clear coals and which would only smoke. The elemental simplicities of wilderness travel were thrills…because they represented complete freedom to make mistakes. The wilderness gave…those rewards and penalties for wise and foolish acts…against which civilization had built a thousand buffers.” Aldo Leopold (1887-1948) 20 21 Mile 44.9 Trees. Here there is a narrow channel with overhanging trees on river right. Mile 45.2 Trees. There are trees overhanging the river from both sides of the river here. Mile 45.6 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp is on river left and has a sand beach and a steep landing with trees and shrubs. Mile 46.3 Junkyard Rapid (Class III). The water goes over a pour over in the middle of the river and towards a tree on river left. The scout for this rapid is from the right bank. Mile 46.6 Camp (Capacity 12). This camp on river left has a large sand beach. Mile 46.9 Trees. There are trees overhanging the river from the right bank here. Mile 47.8 Trees. The river enters a long narrow channel with trees overhanging from the left bank. Mile 48.3 Honey Chute Rapid (Class II). The water funnels into the left bank here. The scout for this rapid is from the left bank. Verde River Approximate Travel Times Put-in/ Take out White Bridge to Clear Creek Clear Creek to Beasley Flat Beasley Flat to Gap Creek Beasley Flat to Childs Childs to Sheep Bridge Sheep Bridge to Horseshoe Dam High (30008000 cfs) 1 or 2 Hours 10 to 20 Minutes 1½ or 2 hours 4 or 5 Hours Miles Low (100-500 cfs) Med (500-3000 cfs) 6 3 or 4 Hours 2 or 3 Hours 3 1½ or 2 hours 30 or 40 Minutes 8 5 or 6 Hours 3 or 4 Hours 17 2 or 3 Days 6 or 7 Hours 32.5 4 or 5 Days 2 or 3 days 1 or 2 Days 10 3 or 4 Hours 2 or 3 Hours 2 or 3 Hours All travel times are approximate and vary greatly with many factors including type of craft, your group’s pace, wind and weather. 22 23 Mile 48.3 Camp (Capacity 10). This camp has a sand and gravel beach on river left. Mile 49.2 End of the Mazatzal Wilderness. In terms of the river corridor, this is where the Mazatzal Wilderness ends. Mile 50.5 River Access Point. Trail Access Point. Trail #11 terminates on river left here. On river right is the end of the Bloody Basin Road. From here it is thirty-eight miles to I-17, and thirty-three miles to Cave Creek by way of the Seven Springs Road. Mile 50.5 Sheep Bridge. This historic bridge was originally constructed in 1943 by the Flagstaff Sheep Company and was known as the Red Point Sheep Bridge. It was entered into the national register of historic places in 1978. In 1988, weakened by the years and a series of floods, the bridge was disassembled. In 1989, the current bridge, which is reminiscent of the original, was erected by the Forest Service, and recalls the ingenuity of the pioneer sheep men. Mile 50.8 Camp (Capacity 10). This camp on river left has a sand beach. From this point on the availability of camps varies greatly with the level of Horseshoe Reservoir. Mile 51.2 Trees. The river appears to go straight here, but the channel is on the right where the water goes through trees into a narrow channel with trees on both sides. Mile 51.5 Horseshoe Reservoir. On Horseshoe Reservoir the amount of camps, current, and time spent traveling depend on the level of the reservoir. If the reservoir is full, there can be 5 or 6 miles of flat water. If the reservoir is 40% to 50% full there may be 2 to 3 miles of flat water. If the reservoir is 10% to 20% full, there may be only one mile of flat water, after the river cuts a winding channel through the lakebed. At this level there may be mud conditions, which can present problems. 24 25

also available

National Parks
USFS NW