Catalina

State Park - Arizona

Catalina State Park sits at the base of the majestic Santa Catalina Mountains. The park is a haven for desert plants and wildlife and nearly 5,000 saguaros. The 5,500 acres of foothills, canyons and streams invites camping, picnicking and bird watching — more than 150 species of birds call the park home. The park provides miles of equestrian, birding, hiking, and biking trails which wind through the park and into the Coronado National Forest at elevations near 3,000 feet. The park is located within minutes of the Tucson metropolitan area. This scenic desert park also offers equestrian trails and an equestrian center provides a staging area for trail riders with plenty of trailer parking. Bring along your curiosity and your sense of adventure as you take in the beautiful mountain backdrop, desert wildflowers, cacti and wildlife.

maps

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Santa Catalina Ranger District in Coronado National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Coronado MVUM - Santa Catalina 2015

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Santa Catalina Ranger District in Coronado National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Pima and Santa Cruz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Pima and Santa Cruz County

Pima and Santa Cruz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure and Map of Catalina State Park (SP) in Arizona. Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.Catalina - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map of Catalina State Park (SP) in Arizona. Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.

Bighorn Sheeps at Catalina State Park (SP) in Arizona. Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.Catalina - Bighorn Sheeps

Bighorn Sheeps at Catalina State Park (SP) in Arizona. Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.

Catalina SP https://azstateparks.com/catalina https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalina_State_Park Catalina State Park sits at the base of the majestic Santa Catalina Mountains. The park is a haven for desert plants and wildlife and nearly 5,000 saguaros. The 5,500 acres of foothills, canyons and streams invites camping, picnicking and bird watching — more than 150 species of birds call the park home. The park provides miles of equestrian, birding, hiking, and biking trails which wind through the park and into the Coronado National Forest at elevations near 3,000 feet. The park is located within minutes of the Tucson metropolitan area. This scenic desert park also offers equestrian trails and an equestrian center provides a staging area for trail riders with plenty of trailer parking. Bring along your curiosity and your sense of adventure as you take in the beautiful mountain backdrop, desert wildflowers, cacti and wildlife.
Nearby Parks Hiking Trails If you’re having a great time here, don’t forget to visit one of the two nearby state parks! Oracle State Park (24 miles) This 4,000acre wildlife refuge is located in the eclectic town of Oracle in the northern foothills of the Catalina Mountains. The park offers day-use picnic areas, over 15 miles of hiking trails, and intersects with the Arizona Trail. (520) 896-2425 Picacho Peak State Park (37 miles) A centuries-old historic landmark, this park offers day-use picnic areas, overnight and RV camping, and hiking trails on and off the peak. Enjoy the view from the top of Picacho Peak, but make sure you bring plenty of water. (520) 466-3183 Hiking, horseback riding, and bicycling on the trails are popular activities. Please review our Hiking Safety Tips and Trail Etiquette before heading out. 50-year Trail: A 7.8-mile trail that begins at the park’s equestrian center and follows a ridgetop for 2.6 miles on the northern half of the park. Continues another 5.2 miles on state trust land. Plan 4 hours hiking each way. Birding Trail: An easy 1-mile loop that passes through three different types of habitat. The trail crosses a wash so seasonal streamflow may occur. Hikers and bicycles only. Bridle Trail: An easy 1.4-mile flat trail connecting the Equestrian Center to the Trailhead. Canyon Loop Trail: A 2.3-mile loop that starts at the park Trailhead on the Romero Canyon Trail and follows a crosscut to the Sutherland Trail. The trail crosses a wash several times so seasonal streamflow may occur. Plan 60 minutes to complete the loop. Nature Trail: An easy 1-mile loop that meanders through lower foothills and desert scrubland. Plan 45 minutes to complete the loop. Hikers and bicycles only. Romero Canyon Trail: A moderately difficult hike that starts at the park Trailhead and immediately crosses a wash so seasonal streamflow may occur. Montrose Pools (usually dry) are within one mile of the trail. Romero Pools is within three miles of the trail after an elevation gain of 1000 ft. After Romero Pools, the trail enters unmaintained wilderness. Trail ends at Romero Pass where it intersects with the Mt. Lemon Trail and West Fork Sabino Trail. Horses are not recommended and bicycles and dogs are not allowed past Montrose Pools. Romero Ruins Interpretive Trail: An easy 0.75-mile loop that starts at the parking lot on the main road near the picnic area. Interpretive signs explain the history and culture of the Hohokam village. Trail crosses a wash so seasonal streamflow may be present. Hikers Only. Sutherland Trail: A difficult 10.8-mile trail that climbs 700 ft, from the park into the Coronado National Forest, through Cargodera Canyon and intersects with the Mt. Lemon Trail. The trail crosses a wash so seasonal streamflow may occur. CATALINA Hiking Safety Tips • Tell someone where you’re going, when you plan to return, and then stick to your plan. • Take one gallon of water per person per day of your trip. If water is limited, don’t talk, eat, smoke, drink alcohol, or consume salt. • Keep an eye on the sky! Thunderheads may signal flash floods, even if it’s not raining. • If you get lost and find a road, stay on it. • Get out of the sun when you’re not moving: use available shade or make shade with blankets, tarps, or coats. • Keep your clothes on to regulate your body temperature and reduce dehydration. • Wear a hat or other head covering. If necessary, improvise head covering. • Rest at least 10 minutes per hour, 30 minutes if you are not regularly physically active. Loosen your shoes, but keep them on. Established 1957 Catalina State Park 09/20 Sitting at the base of the majestic Santa Catalina Mountains, Catalina State Park is a haven for desert plants, wildlife, and archaeology. The 5,500 acres of foothills, canyons, and riverbeds invite camping, picnicking, and bird watching –more than 150 species of birds call the park home. The park provides miles of hiking and biking trails that wind through the park and into the Coronado National Forest. The park also hosts an equestrian center where visitors can saddle up their horses in our staging area and take the trails on horseback. Trails in the national forest provide beautiful scenery to some of the area’s most challenging hikes, so be sure to bring plenty of water before you start your journey. So bring along your sense of adventure as you take in the beautiful desert mountain scenery. Thank you for visiting! 11570 N Oracle Rd, Tucson, AZ 85737 (520) 628-5798 | 1-877-MYPARKS azstateparks.com/catalina AZStateParks Like/Follow/Watch us on: 1-877-MYPARKS | azstateparks.com Park Rules General Rules • Do not litter! “Leave no trace” and pack out what you bring in, or use the trash receptacles provided in the park. • Drive your vehicle only on designated paved surfaces. Park only in designated parking areas. Do not park on the side of the road. • Stay on designated trails. Cutting trails degrades habitat and harms the landscape. • Do not
Hiking Etiquette & Tips Follow Leave No Trace Principles. Preparation: • Inform someone of your plan, when you will return, and then stick to it. • Drink at least 1 litter of water per person per 2 miles. Don’t wait until you get thirsty. • Avoid hiking in the hottest part of the day. • Be aware floods may occur anytime, even if it’s not raining were you are. • Carry a cell phone. • In an emergency dial 911. Trail Use: • Yield to someone traveling faster. • Keep groups small, do not block the trail. • Those traveling uphill should have the right-of-way. Equestrians always have the right-of-way. • Stay on designated trails, desert environments are easily damaged and slow to heal. • Stay in the middle of the trail. • Don’t shortcut switchbacks as this can cause severe erosion problems. Waste: • Pack out what you pack in. • When restrooms are unavailable dig a hole for waste & cover when done. • Use as little toilet paper as possible. • Be at least 200 feet away from the nearest water source. • Remove pet waste in disposal bags. Respect Land & Animals: • Leave what you find, no collecting is allowed. • No wood or ground fires. • Give animals their distance; do not feed wildlife. • Keep pets on a leash. Pusch Ridge Wilderness Area & Desert Bighorn Sheep Management Area The Pusch Ridge Wilderness Area is located within the Coronado National Forest. The first 30 Desert Bighorn Sheep were reintroduced into the Wilderness Area in November 2013, with the overall goal of more than 100 animals after three consecutive years of transplants. Special management restrictions are needed to limit disturbance to the sheep population and to maintain the wilderness character of the area. Please note that Catalina SP is not located in the Management Area, but select trails leaving from the park are. Please ask park staff for more information. 1) It is prohibited to bring in, possess, or allow dogs in the Bighorn Sheep Management Area year round (this includes the Romero Canyon Trail from Montrose Pools to beyond Romero Pools, and parts of Sutherland Trail). 2) Between January 1 through April 30, it is prohibited to enter beyond 400 feet off designated Forest Service trails (e.g., Romero Canyon and Sutherland). 3) It is prohibited to use a campsite or other area by more than a maximum daygroup size of 15 individuals, and maximum overnight group size of six individuals year round. 1300 W. Washington Street Phoenix, Arizona 85007 Reservations (520) 586-2283 Info & TTY (602) 542-4174 Fax (602) 542-4180 Equal Employment Opportunity Agency. This document is available in alternative formats. Contact the ADA Coordinator at (602) 542-4174. State Park • Trails Guide 11570 North Oracle Road Tucson, AZ 85737 Park Phone: (520) 628-5798 Reservations: (520) 586-2283 Canyon Loop Trail 2.3 miles, loop Easy hike through the foothills that begins and ends at the Trailhead parking lot. The loop is created by a link connecting the Romero Canyon Trail and the Sutherland Trail. The trail is relatively flat, about halfway around there is a slope with approximately 90 stairs. There is a bypass trail around the steps for horses. Plan on 90 minutes of walking time to complete the loop. The Canyon Loop Trail crosses a wash several times, so seasonal stream flow may result in wet feet. Sutherland Trail 9.1 miles, one-way — no dogs in Desert Bighorn Sheep Management Area — no bikes in Wilderness Area First few miles are easy hiking. Beginning at Trailhead parking lot, trail gradually climbs 700 feet. Plan on 90 minutes of walking time from the Trailhead to park boundary. After one mile trail weaves in and out of the park and the Coronado National Forest (including the Desert Bighorn Sheep Management Area and the Wilderness Area which is closed to dogs and bicycles respectively). There is a 2.2-mile Trail Link on the north end of the park that connects the Sutherland Trail with the 50-Year Trail. Continuing on Sutherland, this difficult trail climbs through Cargodera Canyon with a steep and rocky ascent to roughly 8,600 feet elevation ending at the Mt. Lemmon Trail (to Mount Lemmon). Total elevation gain of 5,900 feet. 50-Year Trail 8.6 miles, one-way A moderate trail that is especially popular with equestrians and mountain bikers. Trail begins at the park’s Equestrian Center and follows a ridgetop 2.6 miles. A 2.2-mile Trail Link connects the 50-Year Trail with the Sutherland Trail. Or after leaving the park, trail continues for 6 miles through open desert. Terrain is up-and-down through the foothills with a few-hundred feet of elevation gain. Plan on 4 hours of walking time each way for the entire 8.6-mile length of this trail. Romero Canyon Trail 7.2 miles, one-way — no dogs in Desert Bighorn Sheep Management Area, beyond Montrose Pools — no bikes in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness — not recommended for horses beyond Montrose Pools Progressively difficult trail. Montrose Pools and Romeo Pools are shallow catchments on canyon streams that flow seaso
Desert Bighorn Sheep Re-Introduction Regulations The first thirty Desert Bighorn Sheep were re-introduced to the Pusch Ridge Wilderness in November 2013, with the overall goal of more than 100 animals after three consecutive years of transplants. Special management restrictions are needed to limit disturbance to the sheep population and to maintain the wilderness character of the area. 1) It is prohibited to bring in, possess, or allow dogs in the bighorn sheep management area year round (this includes the Romero Canyon trail from Montrose pools to Romero pools and up to Romero Pass). 2) Between January 1 through April 30, it is prohibited to enter beyond 400 feet off designated Forest Service trails (e.g., Romero Canyon and Sutherland). 3) It is prohibited to use a campsite or other area by more than a maximum daygroup size of fifteen (15) individuals, and maximum overnight group size of six individuals year round. No DOGS in Bighorn ar Tr a il Flo ren ce Sheep Management Area 2.6 a Tr 50 ye - Trailhead BOUNDARY NATIONAL Tu RO PARK BOUNDARY Romero Pools ME RO CA Coronado National Forest 0.3 4000' Legend Trail Mileage Between Dots Elevation Above Sea Level Bighorn Sheep Management Area 0.8 8600' AIL 1.7 Montrose 3600' Pools Ranger Station 4800' CANYON LOOP TRAIL To Mount Lemmon 4.3 2.3 N YO 2.1 N TR AI L TR 0.6 0.9 0.5 To Samaniego Ridge Trail & Cañada del Oro Trail SU T HER LA 2. ND 8 M 6000' Romero Pass 2.4 8 0. 2700' FOREST 3400' 1.8 Equestrian Center on cs k 2 .2 T. L EM MO N Catalina State Park AIL TR Oracle Road il lin To Wilderness of Rocks Trail 1.9 To West Fork Sabino Trail & Cathedral Rock Trail This map is intended only as a guide. Persons planning to use the longer trails should carry a topographic map. Each person should carry at least 1 gallon of drinking water per day. Pools are seasonal and may be dry parts of the year.

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