Bill Williams River

National Wildlife Refuge - Arizona

The Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge protects the lower course of the Bill Williams River, to its mouth at Lake Havasu reservoir, in western Arizona. It is located within eastern La Paz and Mohave Counties, in the Lower Colorado River Valley region. Recreation activities include nature walks, bird watching, hiking, and kayaking on the Bill Williams River. The habitats of the refuge are a unique blend of Mojave Desert and Sonoran Desert uplands, desert riparian zones, and marsh wetlands habitats, provides for a diverse array of flora and fauna.

maps

Map of Shoreline Campsites at Lake Havasu in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Lake Havasu - Shoreline Campsites

Map of Shoreline Campsites at Lake Havasu in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of Lake Havasu in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Lake Havasu - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Lake Havasu in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Mohave County

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

La Paz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - La Paz County

La Paz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Mammals at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Bill Williams River - Mammals

Mammals at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Bill Williams River - Birds

Birds at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Butterflies at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Bill Williams River - Butterflies

Butterflies at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Bill Williams River NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/bill_williams_river https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Williams_River_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge protects the lower course of the Bill Williams River, to its mouth at Lake Havasu reservoir, in western Arizona. It is located within eastern La Paz and Mohave Counties, in the Lower Colorado River Valley region. Recreation activities include nature walks, bird watching, hiking, and kayaking on the Bill Williams River. The habitats of the refuge are a unique blend of Mojave Desert and Sonoran Desert uplands, desert riparian zones, and marsh wetlands habitats, provides for a diverse array of flora and fauna.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Mammals Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge Order Rodentia (Rodents) Family Castoridae Beaver (Castor canadensis) Family Erethizontidae Porcupine (Erethizon dorsaturn) Desert Bighorn Sheep. Mammals of the Desert In the vast desert environments numerous mammalian species are found. A drive over the long rough roads on the refuges gives one the impression that the desert is devoid of animal life, but a closer examination reveals numerous burrows between scattered bushes, among rocks, and even on the open plains. The burrows are the home of ground squirrels, pocket mice, and kangaroo rats. The home of the familiar woodrat consist of piles of sticks and cactus joints that are scattered beneath bushes and in rock clefts and caves throughout these refuges. Desert mammals have adapted their lives to the extreme temperature and low humidity of their environments Water conservation is an absolute necessity in their activities, The majority of mammals living in the desert are nocturnal, foraging only at night when the relative humidity is higher and moisture loss from their bodies is kept at a minimum. Most of the desert mammals, especially the smaller ones, have adapted to survive with minimal water and receive needed moisture from plant material. During hot summer days, bighorn sheep lay in the shade of mountain caves. Large eared mule deer forage along desert washes at night and rest during midday in the shade of desert trees and overhanging banks. Bats, the only true flying mammals, find caves, crevices, and mine tunnels ideal places to congregate during the day. Most bats in this area are nocturnal and are rarely seen in the daylight. In the dim, flickering light of the campfire, bats may be seen through the night air catching their meals of insects. Fanily Geomyidae Valley Pocket Gopher (Thomomys bottae) Family Heteromyidae Merriam’s Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys merriami merriami) Desert Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys deserti arizonae) Arizona Pocket Mouse (Perognathus amplus) Little Pocket Mouse (Perognathus longimembris) Bailey’s Pocket Mouse (Perognathus baileyi) Rock Pocket Mouse (Perognathus intermedius) Desert Pocket Mouse (Perognathus pencillatus pricei) Spiny Pocket Mouse (Perognathus spinatus) Black-tailed Jackrabbitt. Canyon Mouse (Peromyscus crinitus disparillis) Deer Mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) Western Harvest Mouse (Reithrodontomys megalotis) Southern Grasshopper Mouse (Onychomys torridus torridus) House Mouse (Mus musculus) Order Lagomorpha (Rabbits and hares) Family Leporidae Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audobonii arizonae) Black-tailed Jackrabbit (Lepus californicus eremicus) Family Sciuridae Occasionally seen in the upland desert, Yuma Antelope Squirrel the jackrabbit is not as common as the (Ammospermophilus harrisii) cottontail. Jackrabbits may be seen anytime during the day. On hot summer Rock Squirrel (Spermophilus varigatus grammurus) days, they are less active and tend to rest in the shade. Their young are called ‘leverets’, and are born fully furred, and Round-tailed Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus tereticaudus neglectus) with their eyes open. They can outrun within an hour of birth! Family Muroidea Order Insectivora (Shrews and moles) Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) Family Soricidae Desert Shrew (Notiosorex crawfordi) White-throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula mearnsi) Desert Woodrat (Neotoma lepida auripilla) Order Chiroptera (Bats) Family Vespertilionidae Western Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus hesperus) Cactus Mouse (Peromyscus eremicus eremicus) Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) Family Antrozoidae Pallid Bat (Antrozous pallidus) Family Phyllostomidae California Leaf-nosed Bat (Macrotus californicus) This desert bat possesses a leaf-like, triangular flap of thick skin projecting upward from the tip of its nose, thus the name “leaf nosed.” It roosts in colonies inside caves and old mine tunnels. They glean large insects from vegetation such as sphinx moths and katydids. California leaf-nosed bats do not hibernate like many bats, nor do they migrate. Family Bovidae Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) (Ovis canadensis mexicana) This magnificent animal is most often seen in dry periods on riverside rocky escarpments. They are occasionally seen along the cliffs of the Bill Williams River where the 2 sub-species are in contact. Bighorns inhabit the rugged mountain terrain and slopes which are sparsely populated with trees, shrubs, and brush. This brown to grayish brown sheep is superbly camouflaged in its mountain habitat and when standing still, the creamy white rump and white muzzle Order Carnivora (Carnivores) Family Felidae Bobcat (Lynx rufus baileyi) Family Cervidae Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervis elaphus) Mountain Lion (Felis concolor) California Leaf-nosed Bat. Family Canidae Coyote (Canis latrans mearnsi) Western Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis) Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotis macrotis) Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus) Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Birds Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge Birding at Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge Created in 1941 as part of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, the Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge encompasses approximately 6,000 acres along the Bill Williams and Lower Colorado Rivers. The four major areas of the refuge include the open waters of an arm of Lake Havasu, the Delta Marsh, riparian woodlands along the Bill Williams River, and surrounding upland deserts with dramatic cliffs. The refuge contains the largest remaining nativevegetation dominated riparian forest along the Lower Colorado River and the only one that is still flood re-generated. Due to the location of the refuge and its rich habitat diversity, it is an important breeding, wintering, and migratory stopover point for birds, as well as providing habitat for many other wildlife species. The 353 bird species are listed in accordance with the 7th edition A.O.U. checklist and the 2012 supplement. If you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit, please contact the Refuge staff and provide a description on the form on the last page. Seasonal status and abundance categories are to be considered as guides and should not be viewed as hard seasonal dates because birds and migration are dynamic and do not follow the calendar definitions of spring and fall. Summer status indicated for many nonbreeding species of shorebirds, terns, flycatchers, vireos, swallows, warblers, tanagers, and grosbeaks actually refers to early fall migration, which begins in July and August for these groups. As landscapes change due to human activities and natural processes, species populations and distributions must change as well. Over time, species may become locally absent (extirpated), restored, newly arrived, endangered, or even extinct. Some have always been rare on the Lower Colorado River. On the Bill Williams River NWR, species once common but now absent or rare include Vermilion flycatcher. wood storks, wood ducks, and vermillion flycatchers. Species that have recently arrived include Eurasian collared doves, indigo buntings, and northern cardinals. Many riparian obligate species that have declined in most areas of the southwest due to habitat changes remain common on the Bill Williams River where their habitat has been restored. We manage habitat to help recover endangered species as well as declining species including many riparian forest birds such as the yellow-billed cuckoo and summer tanager. Data for this list are based on Rosenberg, K.V., R.D. Ohmart. W.C. Hunter and B.W. Anderson, 1991, Birds of the Lower Colorado River. University of Arizona Press; Corman, T. E. and C. Wise-Gervais (eds), Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas, 2005. University New Mexico Press., Audubon Christmas Bird Count http:// birds.audubon.org/christmas-bird-count; ebird http://ebird.org/content/ebird/; and refuge records. How to use your checklist Symbols used in this list are as follows: Occurrence Sp - Spring - period of spring migration (depending on species) from mid- February to early June. S - Summer - June to August. F - Fall - period of fall migration (depending on species) from mid-July to November. W - Winter - December to February. Abundance A - Abundant. A very numerous species. C - Common. Certain to be seen in suitable habitats. U - Uncommon. Present, not certain to be seen. O - Occasional. Seen few times during a season. R - Rare. Seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years. X - Accidental. Fewer than 3 records; vagrants outside their usual range. * Confirmed nester. ** Possible nester. Italicized bird names indicate threatened or endangered species. Sp S F W Ducks, Geese and Swans Gr. White-fronted Goose u r Snow Goose u u Ross’s Goose r r Brant x Canada Goose u u u Trumpeter Swan x Tundra Swan x x Wood Duck (*historical) r r r r Gadwall u x u u Eurasian Wigeon x American Wigeon u x c u Mallard * c c c c Blue-winged Teal u o u o Cinnamon Teal * u o u o Northern Shoveler u o u u Northern Pintail u o u u Green-winged Teal u o u u Canvasback u u c Redhead u r u u Ring-necked Duck c c c Greater Scaup c u c Lesser Scaup u u u Surf Scoter o o o White-winged Scoter o r r o Black Scoter x x x Long-tailed Duck x x x Bufflehead u u c Common Goldeneye c c c Barrow’s Goldeneye u u u Hooded Merganser r r Common Merganser c u c Red-breasted Merganser u u u Ruddy Duck c u c c New World Quail Gambel’s Quail * c c c c Loons Red-throated Loon x x x Pacific Loon o x o o Common Loon u o u Yellow-billed Loon x x x Western grebe with chick. Sp S F W Grebes Pied-billed Grebe * c c c c Horned Grebe o o u Red-necked Grebe x x Eared Grebe u o u u Western Grebe * c c c c Clark’s Grebe * c c c c Storks Wood Stork (historical) c c c c Frigatebirds Magnificent Frigatebird x x Boobys Blue-footed Booby x Brown Booby x Cormorants
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Butterflies Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge Butterflies at Bill Williams River NWR The Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge supports the last and largest remnant of the native riparian habitats that once filled the valleys of the lower Colorado River and its tributaries. These now unique habitats support many butterfly species. A total of 34 species have been documented in the refuge, 11 (32%) of which were found only here in a recent study (Nelson and Andersen 1998). One species, MacNeill’s sootywing skipper, is of some concern to conservationists due to its rarity. The larvae apparently only feed on one species of saltbush (Atriplex lentiformis), a native shrub of the lower Colorado River valley. Wiesenborn (1997) often observed adults flying between the saltbush and honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosis). Scientific name Common name Swallowtails (Papilionidae) Papilio polyxenes Black Swallowtail Papilio Zelacaon Zelacaon Swallowtail Whites and Sulphurs (Pieridae) Pontia protodice Checkered White Colias eurytheme Orange (Alfalfa) Sulphur Phoebis sennae Cloudless Sulphur Eureme nicippe Sleepy Orange (Nicippe Yellow) Nathalis iole Dainty Sulphur Great Purple Hairstreak Gossamer-winged Butterflies (Lycaenidae) Atlides halesus Great Purple Hairstreak Strymon melinus Gray Hairstreak Metalmarks (Riodinidae) Calephelis nemesis Fatal Metalmark Ministrymon leda Leda Ministreak Apodemia mormo Mormon Metalmark Brephidium exile Pygmy Blue Apodemia palmeri Palmer’s Metalmark Leptotes marina Marine Blue Brush-footed Butterflies (Nymphalidae) Libytheana carinenta Snout Butterfly Hemiargus ceraunus Cerannus Blue Hemiargus isola Reakirt’s Blue Calephelis wrighti Wright’s Metalmark Euptoieta claudia Variegated Fritillary Nymphalis antiopa Mourning Cloak Vanessa (Cynthia) cardui Painted Lady Vanessa atalanta Red Admiral References Levy, J. N. 1996. Pers.comm. Milne, L and M. Milne. 1980. Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders. Alfred Knopf, N.Y. 988 pgs. Nelson, S. M. and D. C. Anderson. 1998. Butterfly (Papilionoidea and Hesperioidae) communities associated with some natural and altered riparian habitats along the lower Colorado River. Technical Memorandum No. 8220-98-3. 32 pgs. Tilden, J. W. and A. C. Smith. 1986. A Field Guide to Western Butterflies. Houghton Mifflin, Boston. 370 pgs. Wiesenborn, W. D. 1997. Hesperopsis gracielae (MacNeill) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) flight between hostplants and Prosopis glandulosa Torrey. PanPacific Entomologist 73(3):186-189. Common buckeye. Jumonia coenia Common Buckeye Hylephila phyleus Fiery Skipper Limenitis arthemis Red Spotted Purple Lerodea eufala Euphala Skipper Limenitis (Basilarchia) archippus Viceroy Danaus plexippus Monarch Danaus gilippus Queen Skippers (Hesperiidae) Erynnis funeralis Funereal Duskywing Pyrugus scriptura Small Checkered Skipper Pyrgus communis (Grote) Common Checkered Skipper Heliopetes ericetorum Northern White-Skipper Hesperopsis gracielae (MacNiell) MacNiell’s Sootywing Skipper Copaedes aurantiacus Orange Skipperling Viceroy.

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