Cibola

National Wildlife Refuge - Arizona

Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is located in the floodplain of the lower Colorado River between Arizona and California and surrounded by a fringe of desert ridges and washes. The refuge encompasses both the historic Colorado River channel as well as a channelized portion constructed in the late 1960s. Along with these main waterbodies, several important backwaters are home to many wildlife species that reside in this Yuma Desert portion of the Sonoran Desert. Because of the river's life-sustaining water, wildlife here survive in an environment that reaches 120 °F (49 °C) in the summer and receives an average of only 2 inches (5.1 cm) of rain per year.

maps

La Paz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - La Paz County

La Paz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Birds at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Cibola - Birds

Birds at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Cibola - Birds

Birds at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Reptiles and Amphibians at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Cibola - Reptiles and Amphibians

Reptiles and Amphibians at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Boating and Fishing at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Cibola - Boating and Fishing

Boating and Fishing at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Cibola NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/cibola https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cibola_National_Wildlife_Refuge Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is located in the floodplain of the lower Colorado River between Arizona and California and surrounded by a fringe of desert ridges and washes. The refuge encompasses both the historic Colorado River channel as well as a channelized portion constructed in the late 1960s. Along with these main waterbodies, several important backwaters are home to many wildlife species that reside in this Yuma Desert portion of the Sonoran Desert. Because of the river's life-sustaining water, wildlife here survive in an environment that reaches 120 °F (49 °C) in the summer and receives an average of only 2 inches (5.1 cm) of rain per year.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Cibola National Wildlife Refuge Birds Welcome to Birding at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is located along the lower Colorado River 20 miles south of Blythe, California. Approximately two-thirds of the refuge is in Arizona and onethird is in California. It encompasses 18,555 acres and shares it’s southern boundary with Imperial NWR. The refuge was established in 1964 to mitigate the loss of fish and wildlife habitat involved in the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s water salvage and channelization projects along the Colorado River. Where to Look The main portion of the refuge is alluvial river bottom with dense growths of salt cedar, mesquite, and arrowweed along with several hundred acres of revegetated cottonwood and willow habitat. Through this flows the Colorado River, in both a dredged channel and a portion of its original channel. The refuge also contains ~1,000 acres of farmland and 785 acres of desert foothills and ridges. Although there are birds to be observed year-round, the spring and fall months, with their seasonal migration, offer the greatest variety of species. Nesting birds include the great egret, great blue heron, black-crowned night-heron, least bittern, Ridgway’s rail, white-winged dove as well as common yellowthroat, phainopepla, northern mockingbird, Lucy’s warbler, and other song birds. Did You Find a Rare Bird? The endangered Ridgway’s rail, the only freshwater form of clapper rail, is found in suitable marshes throughout the refuge. Cibola NWR is important as a wintering ground for the western (or Great Basin) subspecies of Canada goose and for Sandhill Cranes. Many ducks, primarily pintail, wigeon, and mallard, also spend a portion of the winter here. How to use your checklist Seasons This list of 287 species is in accordance with the seventh addition of the American Ornithologists’ Union Checklist of North American Birds, 7th edition (1998) and its supplements through July 2016. Those species marked with an asterisk (*) have nested on the refuge. Species that occur as accidental (marked with an “X”) may occur more regularly in areas surrounding the refuge, but most are true geographic rarities. Seasons and occurrences for bird sightings on the refuge are coded below. Note that seasons vary from species to species; fall migration for some, such as shorebirds and flycatchers, is much earlier (mid-July to mid-September) compared to fall migration for other species, such as most waterfowl and sparrows (September to November). Abundance Sp—Spring—period of spring migration (depending on species) from mid-February to early June S—Summer—June to August F—Fall—period of fall migration (depending on species) from mid-July to November W—Winter—December to February A—Abundant: a common and numerous species C—Common: certain to be seen in suitable habitat U—Uncommon: present, but not certain to be seen O—Occasional: seen only a few times during a season R—Rare: seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years X—Accidental: has been seen only once or twice * Has nested on the refuge + Exotic or introduced species Italicized bird names indicate threatened or endangered species. Common Name Sp S F W Ducks, Geese, and Swans ___Fulvous Whistling-Duck X X ___Greater White-fronted Goose U U ___Snow Goose C C ___Ross’s Goose U U ___Brant X ___Canada Goose O A A ___Tundra Swan O O ___Wood Duck U U ___Gadwall U C C ___Eurasian Wigeon O ___American Wigeon U C A ___*Mallard C U C A ___Blue-winged Teal O O ___*Cinnamon Teal C O C O ___Northern Shoveler C O C C ___Northern Pintail C O C A ___Green-winged Teal U U A A ___Canvasback U U U ___Redhead U O C O ___Ring-necked Duck U C C ___Greater Scaup R ___Lesser Scaup U C U ___Bufflehead O C C ___Common Goldeneye R U ___Barrow’s Goldeneye X ___Hooded Merganser O O O ___Common Merganser U U U ___Red-breasted Merganser O R O O ___*Ruddy Duck C O C U New World Quail ___*Gambel’s Quail A A A A Grebes ___*Pied-billed Grebe C C C C ___Eared Grebe C C O ___*Western Grebe C C C C ___*Clark’s Grebe C C C C Pigeons and Doves ___Rock Pigeon O O O O ___Band-tailed Pigeon X ___Eurasian Collared-Dove C C C C ___Common Ground-Dove O O O O ___*White-winged Dove C A ___*Mourning Dove C A C U Cuckoos, Roadrunners, and Anis ___*Yellow-billed Cuckoo U ___*Greater Roadrunner C C C C Common Name Sp S F W Goatsuckers ___*Lesser Nighthawk C C C ___Common Poorwill O O O Swifts ___Vaux’s Swift U U ___White-throated Swift U O O O Hummingbirds ___*Black-chinned Hummingbird U C C C ___*Anna’s Hummingbird O O O C ___*Costa’s Hummingbird C C ___Broad-tailed Hummingbird X ___Rufous Hummingbird U Rails, Gallinules, and Coots ___*Ridgway’s Rail C C C U ___Virginia Rail O O O ___*Sora C C C C ___*Common Moorhen C C C C ___*American Coot A A A A Cranes ___Sandhill Crane O C Stilts and Avocets ___*Black-necked Stilt C U C U ___American Avocet U
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Birds of Cibola National Wildlife Refuge Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is located along the lower Colorado River 20 miles south of Blythe, California. Approximately two-thirds of the refuge is in Arizona and onethird is in California and encompasses 18,555 acres. The refuge was established in 1964 to mitigate the loss of fish and wildlife habitat involved in the channelization projects along the Colorado River. The main portion of the refuge is alluvial river bottom with dense growths of salt cedar, mesquite, and arrowweed along with several hundred acres of revegetated cottonwood and willow habitat. Through this flows the Colorado River, in both a dredged channel and a portion of its original channel. The refuge also contains ~1,000 acres of farmland and 785 acres of desert foothills and ridges. The endangered Ridgway’s rail, the only freshwater form of clapper rail, is found in suitable marshes throughout the refuge. Cibola NWR is important as a wintering ground for the western (or Great Basin) subspecies of Canada goose and for Sandhill Cranes. This list of 287 species is in accordance with the seventh addition of the American Ornithologists’ Union Checklist of North American Birds, 7th edition (1998) and its supplements through July 2016. Those species marked with an asterisk (*) have nested on the refuge. Species that occur as accidental (marked with an “X”) may occur more regularly in areas surrounding the refuge, but most are true geographic rarities. Note that seasons vary from species to species; fall migration for some, such as shorebirds and flycatchers, is much earlier (mid-July to mid-September) compared to fall migration for other species, such as most waterfowl and sparrows (September to November). W Winter December—February Sp Spring March—May S Summer June—August F Fall September—November * Confirmed or probable breeder (39 sps). Federally Endangered or Threatened Species are listed in italics. A Abundant–A very numerous species. C Common–Likely to be seen or heard in suitable habitats. U Uncommon–Present, not certain to be seen. O Occasional–Seen only a few times during the season R Rare–Unexpected, seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years. X Accidental–Fewer than 3 records; vagrants outside their usual range. Breeding records from Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas and refuge records. Common Name Sp S F W Ducks, Geese, and Swans ___Fulvous Whistling-Duck X X ___Gr. White-fronted Goose U U ___Snow Goose C C ___Ross’s Goose U U ___Brant X ___Canada Goose O A A ___Tundra Swan O O ___Wood Duck U U ___Gadwall U C C ___Eurasian Wigeon O ___American Wigeon U C A ___*Mallard C U C A ___Blue-winged Teal O O ___*Cinnamon Teal C O C O ___Northern Shoveler C O C C ___Northern Pintail C O C A ___Green-winged Teal U U A A ___Canvasback U U U ___Redhead U O C O ___Ring-necked Duck U C C ___Greater Scaup R ___Lesser Scaup U C U ___Bufflehead O C C ___Common Goldeneye R U ___Barrow’s Goldeneye X ___Hooded Merganser O O O ___Common Merganser U U U ___Red-br. Merganser O R O O ___*Ruddy Duck C O C U New World Quail ___*Gambel’s Quail A A A A Grebes ___*Pied-billed Grebe C C C C ___Eared Grebe C C O ___*Western Grebe C C C C ___*Clark’s Grebe C C C C Pigeons and Doves ___Rock Pigeon O O O O ___Band-tailed Pigeon X ___Eurasian Collared-Dove C C C C ___Common Ground-Dove O O O O ___*White-winged Dove C A ___*Mourning Dove C A C U Cuckoos, Roadrunners, and Anis ___*Yellow-billed Cuckoo U ___*Greater Roadrunner C C C C Goatsuckers ___*Lesser Nighthawk C C C ___Common Poorwill O O O Swifts ___Vaux’s Swift U U ___White-throated Swift U O O O Hummingbirds ___*Black-ch. Hummingbird U C C C ___*Anna’s Hummingbird O O O C ___*Costa’s Hummingbird C C ___Broad-tail. Hummingbird X ___Rufous Hummingbird U Rails, Gallinules, and Coots ___*Ridgway’s Rail C C C U ___Virginia Rail O O O Common Name Sp S F W ___*Sora C C C C ___*Common Moorhen C C C C ___*American Coot A A A A Cranes ___Sandhill Crane O C Stilts and Avocets ___*Black-necked Stilt C U C U ___American Avocet U R U R Plovers ___Black-bellied Plover R ___Snowy Plover O O R ___Semipalmated Plover O O ___*Killdeer A A C C Sandpipers, Phalaropes, and Allies ___Long-billed Curlew U U U U ___Marbled Godwit O O O ___Ruddy Turnstone X ___Stilt Sandpiper U U U ___Sanderling O O ___Dunlin O O O ___Least Sandpiper C U C C ___Pectoral Sandpiper O R ___Western Sandpiper C C C ___Long-billed Dowitcher U U C C ___Wilson’s Snipe U U C ___Spotted Sandpiper U U C C ___Solitary Sandpiper O O O ___Greater Yellowlegs U O U U ___Willet U O U ___Lesser Yellowlegs O U U ___Wilson’s Phalarope R O O O ___Red-necked Phalarope R O O ___Red Phalarope X Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers ___Sabine’s Gull X ___Bonaparte’s Gull O O ___Laughing Gull X ___Franklin’s Gull X X ___Heerman’s Gull X X ___Ring-billed Gull C O C C ___California Gull R O ___Herring Gull X ___Glaucous-winged Gull X
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Reptiles and Amphibians Cibola National Wildlife Refuge Class Amphibia (Amphibians) Order Anura (Toads, frogs, and treefrogs) Family Bufonidae (Toads) Great Plains Toad Bufo cognatus Red-Spotted Toad Bufo punctatus Woodhouse’s toad B. woodhousii woodhousii Couch Spadefoot Toad Scaphiopus couchii Family Ranidae Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana Class Reptilia (Reptiles) Order Crocodylia (Alligators, caimans, lizards, and iguanian lizards) Lizards Western Banded Gecko Coleonyx variegatus Desert Iguana Dipsosaurus dorsalis Chuckwalla Sauromalus obesus Desert Collared Lizard Crotaphytus insularis Leopard Lizard Gambelia wislizenii Desert Spiny Lizard Sceloporus magister Side-blotched Lizard Uta stansburiana Long-tailed Brush Lizard Urosaurus graciosus Tree Lizard Urosaurus omatus Desert Horned Lizard Phrynosoma platyrhinos Zebra-tailed Lizard Callisaurus draconoides Western Whiptail Cnemidophorus tigris Order Squamata (Snakes) Family Colubridae (Typical snakes) Western Blind Snake Leptotyphlops humilis Coachwhip Masticophis flagellum Western Patch-nosed Salvadora hexalepis Glossy Snake Arizona elegans Banded Sand Snake Chilomeniscus cinctus Gopher Snake Pituophis melanoleucus Common Kingsnake Lampropeltis getulus Longnosed Snake Rhinocheilus lecontei Checkered Garter Thamnophis marcianus Western Groundsnake Sonora semiannulata Western Shovel-nosed Chionactis occipitalis Night Snake Hypsiglena torquata Western Diamondback** Crotalus atrax Sidewinder** Crotalus cerastes Mohave Rattlesnake** Crotalus scutulatus **Known to be poisonous Order Testudines (Turtles and tortoises) Family Trionychidae (Softshell turtles) Spiny softshell turtles Trionyx spiniferus Desert Tortoise Gopherus agassizii It is unlawful to harass or disturb any wildlife within the refuge. February 2018 Top, Desert tortoise. Left, Sideblotched Lizard. Above, Mojave rattlesnake / USFWS Photographs
LD Boating and Fishing U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Cibola National Wildlife Refuge Cibola National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1964 as mitigation for the loss of fish and wildlife habitat due to dam construction and channelization of the Lower Colorado River. Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is working to restore and conserve historic fish and wildlife habitat and provide opportunities for compatible wildlifeoriented recreational activities. Fishing and boating are permitted in designated areas during specific times of the year subject to the regulations provided in this brochure, the Refuge’s general brochure, and Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and state fishing regulations. Individuals utilizing the Refuge are subject to inspection of permits, licenses, fishing equipment, bag and creel, vehicles and boats (and their content) by refuge officers. To ensure your safety and enjoyment while visiting Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, please take time to become familiar with the following regulations. General Regulations Fishing and boating regulations are designed to protect fish and wildlife populations while allowing use of a renewable natural resources. The regulations below supplement the general regulations governing public use of national wildlife refuges as set forth in 50 CFR. Fishing and boating are permitted in the following areas in accordance with all applicable Federal and State fishing and boating laws and regulations unless otherwise specified in this brochure. Persons possessing, transporting, or carrying firearms on national wildlife refuges must comply with all provisions of federal, state, and local law Cibola Lake Fishing and boating area permitted in Cibola Lake from one-half hour before sunrise March 15 through Labor Day. Cibola Lake is a no wake zone and only electric trolling motor or manually powered vessels may be used. Main Channel of the Colorado River Fishing and boating are permitted year-round, except that fishing from the east shore south of the tie-back levee is prohibited from the day after Labor Day until 6:00 a.m. MST March 15. Hart Mine Marsh/Arnett Ditch Fishing and boating are permitted from one half hour before sunrise MST March 15 through Labor day. The rest of the year, fishing and boating are permitted 10:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. MST. Some areas are walk-in access only. Hart Mine Marsh is a no wake zone. High Levee Pond Fishing and boating are prohibited yearround. Old Colorado River Channel and Palo Verde Outfall Drain Fishing and boating are permitted yearround. The old Colorado River channel and Palo Verde outfall drain are no wake zone. Pretty Water Fishing and boating are permitted yearround, except that all entry (including fishing and boating) is prohibited from 3:00 p.m.–4:30 a.m. MST during waterfowl season. Pretty Water is a no wake zone. Three Fingers Lake Fishing and boating are permitted yearround. Three Fingers Lake is a No Wake zone and only electric trolling motor or manually powered vessels may be used. Water Skiing Waterskiing and general boating are permitted on the Main Channel of the Colorado River. All other waters on Cibola National Wildlife Refuge are no wake zone. Motor Vehicles All operators and vehicles must be licensed, registered, and insured for highway use to be operated on refuge roads. Motor vehicle traffic is limited to designated roads and parking areas (see map). The refuge-wide speed limit is 25 mph. Other State and local traffic laws apply. Watercraft can only be launched at designated boat ramps. Prohibited Activities The following activities are prohibited at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge: Littering, Camping, Fires, Taking of wildlife or plants (including cutting trees or brush) unless specified in this or the refuge’s hunting brochure or the state hunting and fishing regulations, Digging up bait, Searching for, damaging, or removing rocks, minerals, or objects of antiquity, Overnight mooring of any watercraft and mooring of any watercraft to vegetation, Fishing by means other than a pole, Fishing or boating in waters not listed in this brochure. For Additional Information Cibola National Wildlife Refuge 66600 Cibola Lake Road Route 2, Box 1 Cibola, AZ 85328 928/857-3253 928/857-3420 Fax December 2017 Ca 5 ay 9 hw Hig n Auto Tour Refuge Headquarters C A N 78 q Cibola Road ai Dr Colorado River d to Nature Trail a ll To I - 8 To Interstate 10 Farm Unit 1 u tf tO 54 Miles Baseline Road ric 78 Bridge Refuge Access Point o Colorad Cibola NWR La Pa na izo Ar a rni lifo Ca is t Palo Verde Irrigation D Palo Verde z Co. Oxbow Lake Colorado River Rive r Neighbour's Blvd. La P Ar az C izo o na . Ripley Riverside Co. Imperial Co. Farmer’s Bridge (Refuge Access) 78 Roa ia rn o lif ola 78 Cib 10 Palo Verde Neighbours Blvd. Riverside County Imperial County Blythe or ni a r a Unit 1 - South lif P W rett at y er Ca l i N z i o f Arizona Farm

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