"Havasu National Wildlife Refuge" by ksblack99 , public domain

Havasu

National Wildlife Refuge - AZ,CA

Havasu National Wildlife Refuge is located on the lower Colorado River in Arizona and California. It preserves habitat for desert bighorn sheep to the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher, birds and other animals. The refuge protects 30 river miles - 300 miles (480 km) of shoreline - from Needles, California, to Lake Havasu City, Arizona. One of the last remaining natural stretches of the lower Colorado River flows through the 20-mile-long (32 km) Topock Gorge. A large river in a dry, hot land attracts wildlife and people like a powerful magnet. Many thousands of visitors annually flock to the refuge to boat through the Topock Gorge, watch waterbirds in Topock Marsh, or hike to the Havasu Wilderness Area.

maps

Trails Map of Cerbat Foothills Recreation Area (RA) in the BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cerbat Foothills - Trails Map

Trails Map of Cerbat Foothills Recreation Area (RA) in the BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of Lake Havasu in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Lake Havasu - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Lake Havasu in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Mohave County

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of Mojave Trails National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mojave Trails - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Mojave Trails National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Map of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Havasu - Map

Map of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Havasu - Hunting

Hunting at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Pintail Slough in Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Havasu - Hunting at Pintail Slough

Hunting at Pintail Slough in Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Havasu - Birds

Birds at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Dragonflies and Damselflies at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Havasu - Dragonflies and Damselflies

Dragonflies and Damselflies at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Plants at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Havasu - Plants

Plants at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arizona and California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Havasu NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/havasu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Havasu_National_Wildlife_Refuge Havasu National Wildlife Refuge is located on the lower Colorado River in Arizona and California. It preserves habitat for desert bighorn sheep to the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher, birds and other animals. The refuge protects 30 river miles - 300 miles (480 km) of shoreline - from Needles, California, to Lake Havasu City, Arizona. One of the last remaining natural stretches of the lower Colorado River flows through the 20-mile-long (32 km) Topock Gorge. A large river in a dry, hot land attracts wildlife and people like a powerful magnet. Many thousands of visitors annually flock to the refuge to boat through the Topock Gorge, watch waterbirds in Topock Marsh, or hike to the Havasu Wilderness Area.
Five-Mile Landing Day Use Area & Boat Launch
E U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Hunting Havasu National Wildlife Refuge Public hunting on Havasu National Wildlife Refuge is permitted in specified areas, except as provided by this brochure. All hunting shall be in accordance with all applicable state and federal regulations. Persons possessing, transporting, or carrying firearms on national wildlife refuges must comply with all provisions of federal, state and local law. Persons may only use (discharge) firearms in accordance with refuge regulations (50CFR 27.42 and specific refuge regulations in 50 CFR part 32). All species of animals and plants are protected except those listed in this brochure. Note that the lengths of some hunting seasons may be different than those designated by the states of Arizona and California. General Regulations • We only allow take of those species specifically listed. We allow hunting of mourning and white-winged dove, duck, coot, moorhen, goose, common snipe, quail, cottontail rabbit, and desert bighorn sheep on designated areas of the refuge. All other species are prohibited. • Havasu NWR is a non-toxic shot zone, use or possession of toxic shot (lead), in the field, is prohibited. • We allow the use of muzzleloader, pistol, pneumatic gun, crossbow, and archery equipment for hunting. • Use of rifles is prohibited (with the exception of Desert Bighorn Sheep hunts). • Target shooting or the discharge of a weapon except to hunt is not permitted. • Motorized vehicles may operate on designated roadways only and must be “street legal” i.e. licensed, insured and equipped to operate on highways. • Pits, permanent blinds and stands, trail or scouting cameras, and baiting are prohibited. • The use or possession of alcoholic beverages while hunting is prohibited. • Temporary blinds, boats, hunting equipment, and decoys must be removed following each day’s hunt. • Guide service providers must obtain a Special Use Permit from the refuge on which they provide services. • No fires • No camping • No falconry • Air-cooled outboard motors (surfacedrive) are allowed, but all air-thrust boats including floating aircraft are prohibited. Closed Areas (as shown on the map) Topock Marsh Entry into the Topock Marsh closed area is prohibited from October 1 through the last day of the state waterfowl season (including the juniors-only hunt). The only exception is through traffic on the Levee Road and the entrance to the Bermuda goose observation tower parking lot. Topock Gorge Topock Gorge (from Blankenship Bend north to Interstate 40) Hunting is prohibited in Topock Gorge, including those refuge lands within ¼ mile of the waters of the Colorado River. Open Areas (as shown on the map) Topock Marsh Designated portions of Topock Marsh are open to hunting. Pintail Slough Pintail Slough is covered by specific regulations detailed in a separate leaflet. Other Refuge Lands Refuge lands and waters south of Blankenship Bend to the north boundary of the Lake Havasu City limits. Big Game Hunting of desert bighorn sheep is allowed by permit only. Permits are issued by the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Migratory Birds Dates, daily bag, and possession limits will be in accordance with respective federal and state regulations. Quail & Rabbit Hunting Dates, daily bag, and possession limits will be in accordance with respective federal and state regulations, except in the Pintail Slough Quota Hunt permit area, where the hunting of cottontail and quail is permitted only by quota hunt permit during the state waterfowl hunt season. Dove Hunting Dates, daily bag, and possession limits will be in accordance with respective federal and state regulations, except in the Pintail Slough Quota Hunt permit area, where the hunting of dove is permitted only by quota hunt permit during the state waterfowl hunt season. Accidents or Injury Accidents involving damage to property, injury to the public or injury to wildlife that occur within the boundaries of any national wildlife refuge are to be reported as soon as possible. To report incidents after hours and weekends call 1-800/637-9152 Injuries or accidents occurring on the refuge during normal duty hours, must be reported immediately to the Refuge Manager at 760/326-3853 ext 123. For Additional Information: Havasu National Wildlife Refuge 317 Mesquite Avenue Needles, CA 92363 760/326-3853 www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/ arizona/havasu/ August 2020
E U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Hunting at Pintail Slough Havasu National Wildlife Refuge 2020-2021 Season Pintail Slough, located in Arizona, is comprised of all refuge lands north of the North Dike and west of Mohave Co. Rd. 1. Species, Dates and Hours Quota Hunt Permit Individuals wishing to hunt waterfowl in the Pintail Slough Quota Hunt permit area must submit an application for a quota waterfowl This leaflet contains hunting regulations for hunt. Applications are available on-line the Pintail Slough only. Consult the general (https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Havasu/ hunting leaflets for regulations activities/hunting.html) or at the Havasu governing public use and hunting on all NWR office in Needles, CA. Applications other areas of the refuge. will be accepted by mail or e-mail (lakehavasurefuges@fws.gov) from General Regulations September 1 to September 14, 2020. Quota 1. We only allow take of those species permits will be selected by random drawing legal sunrise to 2:00PM MST. specifically listed. We allow hunting that will be posted on-line or on social media of mourning and white winged dove, duck, around September 16, 2020. The drawing Daily bag and possession limits coot, moorhen, goose, common snipe, quail, order will determine permit number priority. cottontail rabbit, and desert bighorn sheep on In accordance with Arizona State Once the $25 slot fee is collected from a designated areas of the refuge. All other regulations: info available at: azgfd.gov. drawn applicant, a quota permit number will species are prohibited. be issued. Preferred hunt date and blind Hunting Days (In-state season) 2. Persons possessing, transporting, or location (hunt slot) will be filled by ascending carrying firearms on national wildlife refuges Dove, Cottontail, and Gambel's Quail: permit order. Successful applicants will have Is permitted on all open refuge areas must comply with all provisions of federal, 7 business days to secure a permit number and any designated dove and small state and local law. with payment by CASH, personal check or game fields (A-3 and A-4) in Pintail money order payable to: U.S. Fish and 3. Havasu NWR is a non-toxic shot zone, Slough in accordance with state Wildlife Service. Each drawn hunter may use or possession of toxic ammo (lead), is regulations. Hunting for these species purchase up to (4) hunt slots through the quota prohibited. We allow shotgun, muzzleloader, will not be permitted in the Pintail hunt permit system. Any un-selected hunt pistol, pneumatic gun, crossbow, and archery Slough Quota Hunt permit area. slots remaining after the drawing based equipment for hunting. selections will be filled on a first come, first Quota Hunt Permit Area Regulations 4. Use of rifles is prohibited (with the serve basis until the end of waterfowl season. 1. Hunters must carry their quota hunt permit Each hunter can only obtain a maximum of 10 exception of Desert Bighorn Sheep hunts). and hunt licenses while hunting. quota hunt permits per season. Quota hunt 5. Target shooting or the discharge of a permits can only be issued by Refuge staff at 2. Hunters are required to hunt within 25 feet weapon except to hunt is not permitted. the Needles office during normal business of the numbered post of their assigned blind hours. Call ahead. 6. Motorized vehicles may operate on location or goose field. designated public roadways only and must be Quota Hunt Locations 3. We limit the number of persons at each “street legal” i.e. licensed, insured and Hunt blinds will be available during AZ equipped to operate on highways according to blind to (4), including observers. Observers cannot hold shells or guns unless in possession Desert zone waterfowl season on Wednesdays, Arizona state laws. of valid state license and stamps. Saturdays, and Sundays only, from 4:00am to 7. Pits, permanent blinds and stands, trail or 2:00pm MST. All hunt locations (blinds) are scouting cameras, and baiting are prohibited. 4. All hunters must possess at least 4 decoys reserved the first weekend of January for per blind location (We recommend the outer Youth Hunt Camp. 8. The use or possession of alcoholic decoy be placed no more than 75 feet from the beverages while hunting is prohibited. Goose Field blind to reduce cripples). The goose field (A-1) will be partially planted 9. Temporary blinds, boats, hunting and irrigated. The field is hunt-able on 5. Use of retrieving dogs is encouraged. Dogs equipment, and decoys must be removed Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. Hunting is following each day’s hunt. must always be kept under control. allowed across the entire field. Hunt slots for 10. Guide service providers must obtain a 6. All personal items must be removed at the this location will be filled by quota permit first. Special Use Permit from the refuge on which Any un-selected hunt slots remaining after the end of each day's hunt, including all trash. they provide services. drawing, will be filled on a first come, first serve
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Havasu National Wildlife Refuge Birds Birding at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge Havasu National Wildlife Refuge encompasses 37,515 acres adjacent to the Colorado River. Topock Marsh, Topock Gorge, and the Havasu Wilderness constitute the three major portions of the refuge. Habitat varies from cattail-bulrush back waters and shrubby riparian lowlands to steep cactus-strewn cliffs and mountains. Due to the southerly location of the refuge it is primarily a wintering area and stopover point for migrating birds. The 318 species are listed in accordance with the 7th edition (1998) A.O.U. checklist and its supplements through July 2011. If you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit, please contact the Refuge staff and provide a description. The refuge birds do not recognize traditional calendar seasons, therefore, season designations for species are intended as general guidelines. Summer status indicated for many non-breeding species of shorebirds, terns, flycatchers, vireos, swallows, warblers, tanagers, and grosbeaks actually refers to fall migration, which begins in July and August for these groups. As landscapes change due to human activities and natural processes, species populations and distributions must change as well. Over time, species may become locally absent (extirpated), restored, newly arrived, endangered, or even extinct. Some have always been rare on the Lower Colorado River. On Havasu NWR, extirpated species include Harris’s hawk, gilded flicker, and northern cardinal. Great horned owl © Zen Mocarski / AZFD We manage habitat to help recover declining species including many of the waterfowl as well as riparian forest birds such as the yellow-billed cuckoo and summer tanager. How to use your checklist Symbols used in this list are defined as follows: Occurrence Sp S F W Abundance A C U O R X * ** Spring - period of spring migration (depending on species) from mid-February to early June. Summer - June to August. Fall - period of fall migration (depending on species) from mid-July to November. Winter - December to February. - Abundant. A very numerous species. - Common. Certain to be seen in suitable habitats. - Uncommon. Present, not certain to be seen. - Occasional. Seen few times during a season. - Rare. Seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years. - Accidental. Fewer than 3 records; vagrants outside their usual range. Confirmed nester. Occasional nester. Italicized bird names indicate threatened or endangered species. Sp Ducks, Geese and Swans ___Fulvous Whistling-Duck ___Greater White-fronted Goose ___Snow Goose (white morph) ___Snow Goose (blue morph) ___Ross’s Goose ___Brant ___Cackling Goose ___Canada Goose ___Trumpeter Swan ___Tundra Swan ___Wood Duck ___*Gadwall ___Eurasian Wigeon ___American Wigeon ___Mallard ___Northern Mallard ___Mexican Duck ___Blue-winged Teal ___Cinnamon Teal ___Northern Shoveler ___Northern Pintail ___Green-winged Teal ___Canvasback ___*Redhead ___Ring-necked Duck ___Greater Scaup ___Lesser Scaup ___White-winged Scoter ___Long-tailed Duck ___Bufflehead ___Common Goldeneye ___Barrow’s Goldeneye ___Hooded Merganser ___Common Merganser ___Red-breasted Merganser ___*Ruddy Duck New World Quail ___*Gambel’s Quail Loons ___Red-throated Loon ___Pacific Loon ___Common Loon Grebes ___*Pied-billed Grebe ___Horned Grebe ___Red-necked Grebe ___Eared Grebe ___*Western Grebe ___*Clark’s Grebe S R O X U X R O U X U C C U C O C O O C U R C R O O U U R O R O R F W U C O O X O C O O O C O C O O C O O C X C C C C C C X U A C A C U C C R C R C U R O U U C R R O U U U C U O C C A U U C R U R X C U R U U R C A A A A R U X X R R U R U C R X C C C O R O C U C R C C R C C C O C C C C C Sp Storm-Petrels ___Black Storm-Petrel ___Least Storm-Petrel Boobies ___Blue-footed Booby ___Brown Booby Cormorants ___Neotropic Cormorant ___*Double-crested Cormorant Pelicans ___American White Pelican ___Brown Pelican Herons, Bitterns and Allies ___American Bittern ___*Least Bittern ___*Great Blue Heron ___*Great Egret ___*Snowy Egret ___Tricolored Heron ___Cattle Egret ___*Green Heron ___*Black-crowned Night-Heron Ibises and Spoonbills ___White-faced Ibis ___Roseate Spoonbill Vultures ___Turkey Vulture Hawks, Kites, Eagles and Allies ___Osprey ___White-tailed Kite ___Mississippi Kite ___**Bald Eagle ___Northern Harrier ___Sharp-shinned Hawk ___*Cooper’s Hawk ___Northern Goshawk ___Red-shouldered Hawk ___Swainson’s Hawk ___Zone-tailed Hawk ___*Red-tailed Hawk ___Ferruginous Hawk ___Rough–legged Hawk ___Golden Eagle Falcons ___*American Kestrel ___Merlin ___Peregrine Falcon ___Prairie Falcon Rails, Gallinules and Coots ___Black Rail ___*Yuma Clapper Rail ___*Virginia Rail S F W X X X X X A C X A R A C O X C X U O C C C C R R U C O U C C C O C C C C X R U U R C C U U C X U C C C O O R R U U R O C U C X R U C C C C X O U U U X R R C X C C C C X R X R R
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Dragonflies and Damselflies Havasu National Wildlife Refuge Dragonfly and damselfly at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge There are twenty-five dragonfly and damselfly species listed at the 37,515 acre Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, one of more than 540 refuges throughout the United States. These National Wildlife Refuges are administered by the Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. The Fish and Wildlife Service mission is to work with others “to conserve fish and wildlife and their habitat.” General Information Havasu National Wildlife Refuge encompasses 37,515 acres adjacent to the Colorado River. Topock Marsh, Topock Gorge, and the Havasu Wilderness constitute the three major portions of the refuge. Dragonflies, an important indicator of water quality, can be found on the refuge, primarily in Topock Marsh and Topock Gorge. Dragonflies can be viewed on the refuge year-round, with hot, sunny days providing some of the best viewing. Sixty-three dragonfly and damsel species have been identified in Mohave County, Arizona. Visitors are encouraged to contact refuge staff with a description or photograph, if an unlisted species is observed. Family Scientific Name Common Name Clubtails (Gomphidae) Erpetogomphus compositus White-belted Ringtail Stylurus plagiatus Russet-tipped Clubtail Darners (Aeschnidae) Anax junius Common Green Darner Rhionaeschna multicolor Blue-eyed Darner Skimmers (Libellulidae) Erythemis colocata Western Pondhawk Erythrodiplax basifusca Plateau Dragonlet Male blue-ringed dancer sedula © Dave Welling Photography Libellula luctuosa Widow Skimmer Tramea onusta Red Saddlebags L. pulchella Twelve-spotted Skimmer Pond Damsels–Dancers (Coenagrionidae) Argia moesta Powdered Dancer L. saturate Flame Skimmer Pachydiplax longipennis Blue Dasher Pantala flavescens Wandering Glider Pantala hymenaea Spot-winged Glider Perithemis intensa Mexican Amberwing Sympetrum corruptum Variegated Meadowhawk Sympetrum pallipes Striped Meadowhawk Sympetrum semicinctum Band-winged Meadowhawk Tramea calverti Striped Saddlebags Tramea lacerate Black Saddlebags Argia sedula Blue-ringed Dancer Enallagma civile Familiar Bluet Ischnura barberi Desert Forktail Ischnura hastate Citrine Forktail Ischnura ramburii Rambur’s Forktail This list provided by Kathy Biggs, published author of three dragonfly books, from her research on Dragonfly (Odonata) distribution in San Bernardino County, California; Mohave County, Arizona; and Clark County, Nevada. Dragonfly photographs are used with permission from Dave Welling, professional photographer. October 2012
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Plants of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge The Havasu NWR plant list was developed by volunteer John Hohstadt. As of October 2012, 216 plants have been documented at the refuge. Legend *Occurance (O) *Growth Form (GF) *Exotic (E) A=Annual G=Grass Y=Yes P=Perennial F=Forb N=No B=Biennial S=Shrub T=Tree Family Scientific Name O* GF* E* Common Name Agavaceae—Lilies Family Androstephium breviflorum P F N pink funnel lily Hesperocallis undulata P F N desert lily Aizoaceae—Fig-marigold Family Sesuvium sessile A F N western seapurslane Aizoaceae—Fig-marigold Family Trianthema portulacastrum A F N desert horsepurslane Amaranthaceae—Amaranth Family Amaranthus retroflexus A F N redroot amaranth Tidestromia oblongifolia P F N Arizona honeysweet Apiaceae—Carrot Family Bowlesia incana P F N hoary bowlesia Hydrocotyle verticillata P F N whorled marshpennywort Asclepiadaceae—Milkweed Family Asclepias subulata P F N rush milkweed A. albicans P F N whitestem milkweed Funastrum hirtellum P F N hairy milkweed Funastrum cynanchoides ssp. heterophyllum P F N Hartweg’s twinevine Asteraceae—Aster Family Ambrosia ambrosioides P S N ambrosia leaf bur ragweed Symphyotrichum divaricatum A F N southern annual saltmarsh aster Chloracantha spinosa P F N spiny chloracantha Xylorhiza tortifolia P F N Mohave woodyaster Machaeranthera canescens B F N hoary tansyaster Atrichoseris platyphylla A F N parachute plant Baccharis salicifolia mulefat Baccharis brachyphylla shortleaf baccharis Bebbia juncea var. aspera sweetbush Calycoseris wrightii white tackstem Calycoseris parryi yellow tackstem Chaenactis carphoclinia pebble pincushion Chaenactis fremontii pincushion flower Conyza canadensis Canadian horseweed Chrysothamnus Spp. rabbitbrush Encelia frutescens button brittlebrush Encelia farinosa brittlebrush Dicoria canescens desert twinbugs Antheropeas wallacei woolly easterbonnets Antheropeas lanosum white easterbonnets Ambrosia dumosa burrobush Ambrosia eriocentra woolly fruit bur ragweed Geraea canescens hairy desertsunflower Gnaphalium spp. cudweed Pleurocoronis pluriseta bush arrowleaf Hymenoclea salsola burrobrush Lactuca serriola prickly lettuce Malacothrix californica California desertdandelion Monoptilon bellioides Mojave desertstar Palafoxia arida giant Spanish needle Pectis papposa manybristle chinchweed Perityle emoryi Emory’s rockdaisy Peucephyllum schottii Schott’s pygmycedar Pluchea sericea arrowweed Pluchea camphorata camphor pluchea P S N P S N P S N A F N A F N A F N A F N A F N P S N P S N P S N A F N A F N A F N P S N P S N A F N A F N P S N P S N B F N A F N A F N A F N A F N P F N P S N P S N A F N Porophyllum gracile P S slender poreleaf Psathyrotes ramosissima A F velvet turtleback Rafinesquia neomexicana A F New Mexico plumeseed Sonchus asper A F spiny sowthistle Stephanomeria pauciflora P F brownplume wirelettuce Trixis californica P S American threefold Verbesina encelioides A F golden crownbeard Xanthium spp. A F cocklebur Bignoniaceae—Trumpet-Creeper Family Chilopsis linearis P T desert willow Boraginaceae—Borage Family Amsinckia tessellata P F bristly fiddleneck Tiquilia plicata P F fanleaf crinklemat Cryptantha maritima A F Guadalupe cryptantha Heliotropium curassavicum P F salt heliotrope Pectocarya recurvata P F curvenut combseed Plagiobothrys arizonicus A F Arizona popcornflower Brassicaceae—Mustard Family Arabis glaucovalvula P F bluepod rockcress Brassica campestris A F field mustard Dimorphocarpa wislizeni A F touristplant Lepidium densiflorum A F common pepperweed Lesquerella palmeri A F bladder pod Sisymbrium spp. A F hedgemustard Streptanthella longirostris A F longbeak streptanthella Brassica tournefortii A F Sahara mustard Cactaceae—Cactus Family Opuntia basilaris P beavertail pricklypear Cylindropuntia acanthocarpa P buckhorn cholla Cylindropuntia echinocarpa P Wiggins’ cholla Cylindropuntia bigelovii P teddybear cholla Echinocereus spp. P hedgehog cactus Ferocactus spp. P barrel cactus Characeae—Green algae Family Chara spp. muskgrass N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N Y N N N N N N N Chenopodiaceae—Goosefoot Family Salicornia spp. P S pickleweed Atriplex canescens P S fourwing saltbush Atriplex hymenelytra A S desertholly Atriplex canescens var. linearis P S thinleaf fourwing saltbush Atriplex semibaccata P S Australian saltbush Atriplex elegans var. fasciculata P S wheelscale saltbush Atriplex lentiformis P S big saltbush Atriplex polycarpa P S cattle saltbush Bassia hyssopifolia A S fivehorn smotherweed Chenopodium album A F lambsquarters Chenopodium murale A F nettleleaf goosefoot Bassia spp. A F smotherweed Salsola tragus A S prickly Russian thistle Suaeda moquinii P S Mohave seablite Convolvulaceae—Morning-glory Family Convolvulus arvensis A F field bindweed Cuscuta denticulata parasite desert dodder Cucurbitaceae—Cucumber Family Cucurbita palmata

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