"Fort Ord National Monument" by Bureau of Land Management California , public domain

Fort Ord

Brochure

brochure Fort Ord - Brochure

Brochure of Fort Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL ADMINISTRATIVE RD 96 TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Fort Ord Trails Are Shared Access The BLM manages the Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that protects natural values, honors the military and cultural heritage of the landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard Military Heritage Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and dedication of the men and women who served our nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. under BLM administration following the completion century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining expanses of maritime chaparral composed of shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that supports numerous plant and animal species. • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. YIELD TO For Your Enjoyment to use as a training ground for field artillery and cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. U.S. Army Photo BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL ADMINISTRATIVE RD 96 TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Fort Ord Trails Are Shared Access The BLM manages the Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that protects natural values, honors the military and cultural heritage of the landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard Military Heritage Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and dedication of the men and women who served our nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. under BLM administration following the completion century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining expanses of maritime chaparral composed of shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that supports numerous plant and animal species. • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. YIELD TO For Your Enjoyment to use as a training ground for field artillery and cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. U.S. Army Photo BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL ADMINISTRATIVE RD 96 TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Fort Ord Trails Are Shared Access The BLM manages the Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that protects natural values, honors the military and cultural heritage of the landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard Military Heritage Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and dedication of the men and women who served our nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. under BLM administration following the completion century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining expanses of maritime chaparral composed of shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that supports numerous plant and animal species. • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. YIELD TO For Your Enjoyment to use as a training ground for field artillery and cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. U.S. Army Photo BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. 96 TRAIL Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. ADMINISTRATIVE RD Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Trails Are Shared Access landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay YIELD TO military and cultural heritage of the In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument Military Heritage covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and administered by the Bureau of Land Management dedication of the men and women who served our (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to under BLM administration following the completion its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. For Your Enjoyment Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! protects natural values, honors the • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. The BLM manages the Fort Ord Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich to use as a training ground for field artillery and biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of expanses of maritime chaparral composed of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished supports numerous plant and animal species. Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s U.S. Army Photo primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. 96 TRAIL Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. ADMINISTRATIVE RD Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Trails Are Shared Access landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay YIELD TO military and cultural heritage of the In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument Military Heritage covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and administered by the Bureau of Land Management dedication of the men and women who served our (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to under BLM administration following the completion its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. For Your Enjoyment Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! protects natural values, honors the • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. The BLM manages the Fort Ord Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich to use as a training ground for field artillery and biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of expanses of maritime chaparral composed of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished supports numerous plant and animal species. Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s U.S. Army Photo primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. 96 TRAIL Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. ADMINISTRATIVE RD Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Trails Are Shared Access landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay YIELD TO military and cultural heritage of the In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument Military Heritage covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and administered by the Bureau of Land Management dedication of the men and women who served our (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to under BLM administration following the completion its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. For Your Enjoyment Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! protects natural values, honors the • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. The BLM manages the Fort Ord Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich to use as a training ground for field artillery and biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of expanses of maritime chaparral composed of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished supports numerous plant and animal species. Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s U.S. Army Photo primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. ' 18 51 55 Jack’s Peak County Park 68 S Jan 2020 RD NE HEN CH A R N KE N 54 52 Rd 14 20 17 23 ─ 57 20 23 G TO N RD Original data were compiled from various sources and may be updated without notification. 18 14 19 52 t Wa ate sG kin D IN No warranty is made by the Bureau of Land Management as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of these data for individual or aggregate use with other data. d Lion 's Rev eng eR 59 69 69 mith Je r r y S r co r r i d o ling Rd Gig Closeup View of Trails Easily Accesed from the Jerry Smith Corridor ● ● Laguna Seca Recreation Area MO U T T r a in in g F a c i l i ty See Inset Map For Closeup View U.S. Army Managed Portion of National Monument Currently Closed to Public Use Munition Hazards ● ● ─ AD Bunkers B a d g e r Hills T r a ilh e a d Private Property Do Not Enter 0.5 Parking State Routes County Parks/Lands State Park U.S. Army BLM Fort Ord National Monument # Toilet Nonmotorized Paved Roads Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail Trail Number Campground Fire Station Gates Ponds/Vernal Pools Nonmotorized Dirt Roads ─ Munitions Hazard Single Track Trails County Trails Veterans Cemetary 1 Kilometer 1 Mile Paved Roads ● ● 0.25 0.5 Monterey County Toro Regional Park 0 0 C re e k s id e T e rra c e T r a ilh e a d Sensitive Habitat Area Please Use Only Signed Trails Fort Ord National Monument

also available

National Parks
USFS NW