Big Basin Redwoods

State Park - California

Big Basin Redwoods State Park is located about 36 km (22 mi) northwest of Santa Cruz. The park contains almost all of the Waddell Creek watershed, which was formed by the seismic uplift of its rim, and the erosion of its center by the many streams in its bowl-shaped depression. The park is part of the Northern California coastal forests ecoregion and is home to the largest continuous stand of ancient coast redwoods south of San Francisco. Elevations in the park vary from sea level to over 600 m (2,000 ft). The park has over 130 km (81 mi) of trails. Some of these trails link Big Basin to Castle Rock State Park and the eastern reaches of the Santa Cruz range. The Skyline-to-the-Sea Trail threads its way through the park along Waddell Creek to Waddell Beach and the adjacent Theodore J. Hoover Natural Preserve, a freshwater marsh.

maps

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Big Basin Redwoods State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Big Basin Redwoods - Brochure

Brochure of Big Basin Redwoods State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Big Basin Redwoods State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Big Basin Redwoods - Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Big Basin Redwoods State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Campground Map of Big Basin Redwoods State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Big Basin Redwoods - Campground Map

Campground Map of Big Basin Redwoods State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=540 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Basin_Redwoods_State_Park Big Basin Redwoods State Park is located about 36 km (22 mi) northwest of Santa Cruz. The park contains almost all of the Waddell Creek watershed, which was formed by the seismic uplift of its rim, and the erosion of its center by the many streams in its bowl-shaped depression. The park is part of the Northern California coastal forests ecoregion and is home to the largest continuous stand of ancient coast redwoods south of San Francisco. Elevations in the park vary from sea level to over 600 m (2,000 ft). The park has over 130 km (81 mi) of trails. Some of these trails link Big Basin to Castle Rock State Park and the eastern reaches of the Santa Cruz range. The Skyline-to-the-Sea Trail threads its way through the park along Waddell Creek to Waddell Beach and the adjacent Theodore J. Hoover Natural Preserve, a freshwater marsh.
Big Basin Redwoods State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. “ These trees, because of their size and antiquity, were among the natural wonders of the world and should be saved for posterity.” California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (831) 338-8860. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. –Andrew P. Hill, 1899 CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Big Basin Redwoods State Park 21600 Big Basin Way Boulder Creek, CA 95006 (831) 338-8860 © 2011 California State Parks (Rev. 2018) Photo courtesy of Ruskin K. Hartley B ig Basin Redwoods, California’s oldest state park, covers more than 18,000 acres ranging from sea level to more than 2,000feet elevation. This acreage launched the state park movement in California. Big Basin’s biggest attraction— literally— is a rare stand of awe-inspiring, ancient coast redwoods that are among the tallest and oldest trees on Earth. Some measure more than 300-feet tall and 50 feet in circumference. Scientists estimate that these trees may range from 1,000 to 2,500 years old. Spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, lush waterfalls, more than 80 miles of roads and trails, and a fascinating natural and cultural history have beckoned millions of visitors to Big Basin since 1902. nati Humans lived in or near Big Basin for at least 10,000 years before the Spanish explored the area in the late 1700s. The Big Basin area was home to the Cotoni and Quiroste tribes, two of more than 50 tribes comprising the Ohlone culture of the San Francisco and Monterey Bay areas. Grinding rocks, where Native People pounded acorns and other seeds into flour, are evidence that today’s parkland served as the interior “food basket” for coastal people. They harvested seeds of grassland plants in the meadows and gathered soap root and other bulbs for food and other uses. Parts of willow, sedge, horsetail, and fern were used to create baskets. They hunted elk, pronghorns, and mule deer. The Quiroste and Cotoni used fire and other land-management practices to promote the growth of useful plants and maintain a healthy and productive ecosystem. The Ohlone led resistance to the local Spanish mission influence in the late 1700s. Eventually, tribal culture collapsed in the face of contagious European diseases, natural-resource destruction, and the suppression of their native customs. Today, descendants of these tribes are working toward federal recognition and revitalizing their native traditions. THE REDWOODS Big Basin’s coast redwoods, Sequoia sempervirens, are native to the United States; they grow only along the coast from southern Oregon to Central California. The name Sequoia may honor Sequoyah, the 19th-century inventor of the Cherokee alphabet, and sempervirens means “ever living.” These trees are part of a once-huge ancient forest of which less than 5 percent remains. The redwood is California’s official state tree. Sawmill, 1900 Sempervirens Club with the famous Father of the Forest tree, 1901 The Santa Cruz redwood forest was first noted in accounts of a Spanish coastal expedition led by Gaspar de Portolá in 1769. Less than a century later, logging— to meet the demands of the Gold Rush and urban development — threatened to deplete the forest. By 1884, the area’s 28 sawmills were annually processing more than 34 million board feet of lumber, as well as shingles, railroad ties, and posts. PARK HISTORY As logging continued, a battle to protect the ancient trees in the heart of Big Basin became the focus of citizens united to save the redwoods. Photographer Andrew P. Hill, journalist Josephine McCrackin, writer-publisher Carrie Stevens Walter, and a growing coalition of journalists, politicians, artists, businessmen, and scholars formed the Sempervirens Club in May of 1900. As Walter wrote, “Once gone, no human power or ingenuity can replace them. Even the most callous-minded materialist does not love to think of this swirling globe as a treeless place.” The Sempervirens Club enlisted and mobilized supporters throughout the state to join the race to pass legislation that would protect Big Basin’s ancient The forest supports a variety of redwoods. In life. Top to bottom: false turkey tail fungus, western azalea, March 1901, banana slug a State bill created California Redwood Park (renamed Big Basin Redwoods State Park in 1927). In the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps constructed the redwood Nature Lodge
Parque Estatal Big Basin Redwoods Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (831) 338-8860. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. “ Estos árboles, debido a su antigüedad y tamaño, se encuentran entre las maravillas naturales del mundo y deben conservarse para la posteridad”. –Andrew P. Hill, 1899 CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Big Basin Redwoods State Park 21600 Big Basin Way Boulder Creek, CA 95006 (831) 338-8860 © 2011 California State Parks (Rev. 2015) La fotografía es cortesía de Ruskin K. Hartley, de la Liga Save the Redwoods B ig Basin Redwoods es el parque estatal más antiguo de California, cubre más de 18.000 acres que van desde el nivel del mar hasta más de 2,000 pies de elevación. Esta superficie lanzó el movimiento de parques estatales en California. La mayor atracción de Big Basin es, literalmente, su excepcional hilera de antiguas e inspiradoras secuoyas que se encuentran dentro del grupo de árboles más altos y antiguos del planeta. Algunos tienen más de 300 pies de alto y 50 pies de circunferencia. Los científicos estiman que estos árboles pueden tener entre 1,000 y 2,500 años. Desde 1902, las vistas espectaculares del Océano Pacífico, las exuberantes cascadas, más de 80 millas de rutas y senderos y una historia natural y cultural fascinante han atraído millones de visitantes a Big Basin. los indÍgenAS Los seres humanos vivieron en Big Basin o en sus cercanías al menos 10,000 años antes de que los españoles exploraran el área en los años 1700. El área de Big Basin era el hogar de las tribus cotonis y quirostes, dos de más de 50 tribus que constituían la cultura ohlone de las áreas de San Francisco y la Bahía de Monterey. Las rocas de molienda, donde los nativos machacaban las bellotas y otras semillas para convertirlas en harina, son el testimonio de que el actual terreno del parque servía como una fuente de alimentos interna para los pueblos costeros. Cosechaban las semillas de las praderas y recolectaban jabonera norteamericana (chlorogalum) y otros bulbos que usaban a modo alimento y también con otros propósitos. Las partes de los helechos, la cola de caballo o las ciperáceas se utilizaban para crear cestas. Cazaban uapitíes, antílopes americanos y ciervos mulo. Los quirostes y los cotonis utilizaban el fuego y aplicaban otras técnicas de labranza para promover el crecimiento de plantas útiles. Los ohlones pusieron resistencia a la influencia local de la misión española local a fines en los años 1700. Finalmente, la cultura tribal colapsó debido a las enfermedades europeas, la destrucción de los recursos naturales y la eliminación de sus costumbres nativas. Actualmente, los descendientes de estas tribus se esfuerzan por lograr el reconocimiento nacional y reivindicar sus tradiciones nativas. Aserradero, 1900 LAS SECUOYAS Las secuoyas costeras de Big Basin, sequoia sempervirens, son autóctonas de los Estados Unidos, y crecen únicamente a lo largo de la costa que se extiende desde el sur de Oregón hasta California central. Club Sempervirens con el famoso árbol Padre del Bosque, 1901 El nombre “secuoya” surgió en honor a Sequoyah, el inventor del alfabeto cherokee en el siglo XIX, y “sempervirens” significa “siempre viva”. Estos árboles son parte de lo que una vez fue un enorme bosque antiguo del cual solo queda un cinco por ciento. La secuoya es el árbol oficial de California. En 1769, el bosque de secuoyas de Santa Cruz fue registrado en informes de expediciones costeras españolas lideradas por Gaspar de Portolá. Menos de un siglo después, con el objeto de satisfacer las demandas del desarrollo urbano de la fiebre del oro, la tala amenazó con destruir el bosque. Para 1884, los 28 aserraderos del área procesaban anualmente más de 34 millones de pies tabla de madera, tejas, durmientes y postes. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE A medida que la tala continuaba, se desató una batalla para proteger los antiguos árboles en el centro de Big Basin, lo cual provocó que los ciudadanos se unieran para salvar las secuoyas. En mayo de 1900, el fotógrafo Andrew P. Hill, la reportera Josephine McCrackin, la escritora y editora Carrie Stevens Walter y una creciente coalición de reporteros, políticos, artistas, empresarios y académicos formaron el Club Sempervirens. Como
Big Basin Redwoods State Park Big Basin Redwoods State Park CAMPGROUND RULES AND INFORMATION 21600 Big Basin Way • Boulder Creek, CA 95006 (831) 338-8860 Please follow these rules and regulations during your visit and help preserve the qualities that make Big Basin a special place. ai t Tr l e p i ng Fo r e s k Ro ca pe Es Tr a il ee S emper vir ens Cr l C r 236 Sky Meadow Group Camp sin Bi g Ba W ay ia Sequo rt h No Trail Wastahi Walk-in Campground Ro ad Tra i l Trail ebe rry Cre y w do M ea do Sequoia Group Camp Nature Lodge and Store Sha ckl Sk e li n Sky To The S Old Lodge ek w o bro rail k T Huckleberry Campground & Tent Cabins p Lo o Th l i ne T 236 od wo ed S equ Bl o o ms ai l p al . Blooms Creek Campground ms C r e ek East Ridge Trail e k © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2018) Bloo in W a d d e l l Cre e to 9 & Boulder Creek 236 M tn Hi h Cre r ail ek T Sempervirens Campground P l Cre n ek Bl Ham oo m m o s C nd R ree k d oa O oi a Jay Trail Camp r E a s t Ridg e T ai ky o S Bob Kirsch Connector Trail Trail eS e a Tra il Park Headquarters & Visitor Center Pine Mtn . Road CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov. ad ea et Hih Skyl i Co n Ha nem nn ect mon or Tra d il Tick Opa or Tr Rattlesnake br o ad Poison oak w do gF rail tT R e ns Warning: Be aware of the presence of poison oak, rattlesnakes, ticks, and yellow jackets. Yellow jacket Sempervirens Falls eek es k DOGS must be kept on a six-foot-maximum leash and may not be left unattended at any time. They are ek pin Picnic Loop o Cr PLANTS, FLOWERS, mushrooms, natural scenery, and animals are protected by law from human disturbance of any kind. Nails, axes, knives, and other sharp objects may not be put into any trees, downed logs, campsite tables, and parking barriers. Hammocks may not be hung from the trees. zos C re e Ga PAY SHOWERS are located in the campgrounds. Change is available from the Blooms Creek Camp Host and at Park Headquarters. Showers accept two quarters for two minutes. GAMES must be safe and not damage park resources. No airsoft weapons, BB guns, paintball guns, or horseshoes. Drones are prohibited in all of Big Basin Redwoods State Park. If in doubt, please ask staff. Su Hu FIRES are allowed only in stoves or in the provided metal fire rings. Do not build fires outside of fire rings. Fires must be completely out when not attended. All fireworks are prohibited. ol l CHECK-OUT time is noon. Please vacate your site by this time, including vehicles and all belongings. Do ood GENERATORS may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. ok Sequoia Trail Cre e THIS IS A CRUMB-CLEAN CAMPGROUND: You are required to secure your food and trash at all times, except when eating, to protect yourself and park wildlife. Raccoons, birds, and squirrels can be aggressive and will steal food that has been left out. Lock food and ice chests inside a vehicle or the campsite food storage locker. It is not secure in tents. Dispose of trash and food waste into the campground dumpsters immediately to keep wildlife from consuming or spreading it around. Please recycle your plastic, glass, and aluminum. Sha to 9 & Saratoga Gap Cr e WOOD COLLECTING, including leaves and twigs, is not allowed. This material decays and assists the growth of live trees and other plants. Firewood is sold at the park year-round. to Lodge Road Slippery Rock i Tra QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Radios and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers. BICYCLES are restricted to paved roads and fire roads only. They are not allowed on any of the trails. Bicycle riders under age 18 must wear a helmet. Bicycles ridden after dark must be properly illuminated. Please ride safely. Big Basin is California’s oldest state park, established in 1902. Camping and tent cabin reservations are essential during peak season and may be made year round. Unreserved campsites and tent cabins will be sold on a first-come, firstserved basis. Tent cabins are operated by a concessionaire. Redw VEHICLES must register at Park Headquarters and display a valid receipt on the windshield prior to parking. Vehicles must park in their designated campsite space only. Standard tent or RV drive-in sites allow parking for one vehicle and one extra vehicle. Trailers are counted as a vehicle. Walk-in tent sites allow parking for one vehicle only in an assigned parking lot space. Fees are due for all extra vehicles, except trailers. No parking is allowed along campground roads. Extra or oversize vehicl

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