"Alabama Hills" by Bureau of Land Management California , public domain

Alabama Hills

National Scenic Area - California

The Alabama Hills National Scenic Area is located west of Lone Pine, California. The Alabama Hills are a formation of rounded rocks and eroded hills set between the jagged peaks of the Sierra Nevada and the geologically complex Inyo Mountains. Both geologic features were shaped by the same uplifting occurring 100 million years ago. Visitors enjoy touring film sites, photography, rock climbing, exploring natural arches, and viewing the swaths of wildflowers that bloom every spring.

maps

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southern Sierra area in Inyo National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Inyo MVUM - Southern Sierra 2018

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southern Sierra area in Inyo National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Map and Guide of Alabama Hills Recreation and National Scenic Area (NSA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Alabama Hills - Map and Guide (mobile)

Map and Guide of Alabama Hills Recreation and National Scenic Area (NSA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map and Guide of Alabama Hills Recreation and National Scenic Area (NSA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Alabama Hills - Map and Guide

Map and Guide of Alabama Hills Recreation and National Scenic Area (NSA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM California - Freshwater Fishing

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Alabama Hills NSA https://www.blm.gov/visit/alabama-hills-national-scenic-area https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alabama_Hills The Alabama Hills National Scenic Area is located west of Lone Pine, California. The Alabama Hills are a formation of rounded rocks and eroded hills set between the jagged peaks of the Sierra Nevada and the geologically complex Inyo Mountains. Both geologic features were shaped by the same uplifting occurring 100 million years ago. Visitors enjoy touring film sites, photography, rock climbing, exploring natural arches, and viewing the swaths of wildflowers that bloom every spring.
U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Alabama Hills Recreation and National Scenic Area Map & Guide The Alabama Hills are a formation of rounded rocks and eroded hills set between the jagged peaks of the Sierra Nevada and the Owens Valley. The hills consist of nearly 30,000 acres of public land located west of Lone Pine that are managed by the Bureau of Land Management. In March 2019, Congress designated 18,610 acres of the Alabama Hills as a National Scenic Area. Care for and Enjoy the Alabama Hills The indigenous people of this valley still reside in this place where their ancestors have lived for thousands of years. They ask that you respect and care for this land. • Pack out all trash. There are no trash services. In the high desert environment, even natural items like orange peels take years to decompose. • Travel on existing roads and trails. Vegetation in this climate can take decades to recover when crushed by off road driving or parking. • Camp in campgrounds. Using campgrounds reduces the number of vehicles, so that the great views are not blocked. • Use the restroom in town or at nearby campgrounds. If that isn’t an option, bury human waste in catholes 6 inches deep and 200 feet away from water, trails and camp. There are no restrooms in the hills. • Have a great time. The Alabama Hills are a great place to explore natural wonders and experience your public lands. Photographer capturing Mobius Arch by Jim Pickering, Cover photo of photographers by Bob Wick Tent site at Tuttle Creek Campground near sunset by Josh Hammari Day Use The Alabama Hills is a small Recreation and National Scenic Area best suited for day use. Here are just a few things you can do: Explore the locations of over 400 • Take pictures. The Alabama Hills scenery has been an inspiration for photographers for decades. rock climb, explore • Have an adventure. natural arches, mountain bike, ride horses, view the Overnight Use Tuttle Creek Campground, located within the National Scenic Area, offers more than 80 sites for affordable camping with spaces for tents, RVs, and trailers. The campground boasts views of Mt. Whitney, and has large campsites with plenty of space for longer vehicles. Drinking water and restrooms are available. Tuttle Creek birding opportunities. Camping is also available at the Portagee Joe Campground just to the east of the Alabama Hills and the Lone Pine Campground on the Whitney Portal Road. Camping in campgrounds helps maintain the area’s great scenery and recreational opportunities. City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power lands in the area are open for day use only. Photo from The Lawless Range courtesy of Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Western Film History Film & Television an interest in the Alabama Hills for its natural scenery. Movie stars such as Tom Mix, Hopalong Cassidy, Gene Autry, and the Lone Ranger, shot it out with outlaws. Classics such as Gunga Din, Yellow Sky, and How the West Was Won 1990 Sci-Fi classic Tremors on location in the Alabama Hills. During 1993, portions of Maverick Star Trek Generations, Gladiator, Iron Man, and Django Unchained Find a copy of the Movie Road Touring Brochure online or at the Museum of Western Film History in Lone Pine. Each October, the community of Lone Pine hosts the Lone Pine Film Festival. This festival features speakers, The hills were named after the C.S.S. Alabama, a Confederate warship responsible for wreaking havoc during the Civil War. Prospectors sympathetic to the Confederate cause named their mining claims after the Alabama and eventually the name stuck. Geology The rounded, oddly shaped contours of the Alabama Hills form a sharp contrast to the glacially carved ridges of the Sierra Nevada. While both land forms consist of the same granitic rock, the fantastic shapes of the hills were formed by a combination of natural chemical weathering and wind erosion. Mobius Arch Eye of the Alabama The Corridors Red-tailed hawk Townsend’s big-eared bat Desert needlegrass Barrel cactus Wildlife Chuckwalla lizard Plants Scarlet milk-vetch Alabama Hills with Mt. Whitney in the distance by David Kirk y wa gh Hi BLM Public Lands Private Lands Maintained Road (suitable for passenger cars) M Te ch n Unmaintained Road Multi-Use Trail 0.5 fa of d hR nc a tR 395 Chic Chick ken Ranch (Moffat Ranch Road Area) Technical 4 Movie Site O w e ns Geologic Feature/Arch WD Riv er Information Lo Man of Steel uct s Aqued ngele sA Campground Point of Interest bac Hog Iron Man Inset map on re reverse 1872 Ear Earthqua thquak ke Fault Scarp vie Mo Portagee Joe Campground Whitne Whitn ey Portal Road Horseshoe M Gunga Din Temple Site ow Tuttle Creek Road d oa sR Tuttle Creek Campground Film History Histor Museum Lone Pine Reser Reservation 136 Visitor Center ead Inyo National Forest Lone Pine Information Kiosk ad Ro Lone Pine Campground 2 Miles WD ical 4 Trail d kR 1 5 39 L
Don’t Crush the Brush Desert plants keep the soil healthy and provide homes and food for wildlife. While these plants are specially adapted for their environment, they can be destroyed easily if walked on or run over by a vehicle. Stick to designated trails and roads to keep your public lands healthy. The Bureau of Land Management and the Alabama Hills Stewardship Group care for this area with the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management The Alabama Hills are a formation of rounded rocks and eroded hills set between the jagged peaks of the Sierra Nevada and the Owens Valley. The hills consist of nearly 30,000 acres of public land located west of Alabama Hills Recreation and National Scenic Area goal of keeping the hills in as close to a natural state Lone Pine that are managed by the Bureau of Land Management. In March 2019, Congress designated 18,610 acres of the Alabama Hills as a National Scenic Area. Care for and Enjoy the Alabama Hills The indigenous people of this valley still reside in this place where their ancestors have lived for thousands of years. They ask that you respect and care for this land. as possible for the enjoyment of present and future Do not disturb or destroy anything that you may find. generations. • Pack out all trash. There are no trash services. In the high desert environment, even natural items like orange In an Emergency peels take years to decompose. • Call 9-1-1 • Travel on existing roads and trails. Vegetation in this • Inyo County Sheriff (760) 878-0383 climate can take decades to recover when crushed by • Nearest hospital: Southern Inyo Hospital (760) 876-5501 501 East Locust Street, Lone Pine, CA off road driving or parking. The Alabama Hills is a small Recreation and National Scenic Area best suited for day use. Here are just a few things you can do: • Tour film sites. Explore the locations of over 400 movies that have been filmed here. • Take pictures. The Alabama Hills scenery has been an inspiration for photographers for decades. • Have an adventure. Hike, fish, rock climb, explore natural arches, mountain bike, ride horses, view the the number of vehicles, so that the great views are not wildflowers or find your own adventure. blocked. Overnight Use For More Information: If that isn’t an option, bury human waste in catholes 6 Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100 Bishop, CA 93514 (760) 872-5000 https://www.blm.gov/california camp. There are no restrooms in the hills. BLM/CA/GI-2015/007+8300+1115 REV 2019 Day Use • Camp in campgrounds. Using campgrounds reduces • Use the restroom in town or at nearby campgrounds. Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter https://www.blm.gov/media/magazinesand-newsletters/california-newsbytes Tent site at Tuttle Creek Campground near sunset by Josh Hammari inches deep and 200 feet away from water, trails and • Have a great time. The Alabama Hills are a great place to explore natural wonders and experience your public lands. Tuttle Creek Campground, located within the National Scenic Area, offers more than 80 sites for affordable camping with spaces for tents, RVs, and trailers. The campground boasts views of Mt. Whitney, and has large campsites with plenty of space for longer vehicles. Drinking water and restrooms are available. Tuttle Creek runs through the campground, providing fishing and birding opportunities. Camping is also available at the Portagee Joe Campground just to the east of the Alabama Hills and the Lone Pine Campground on the Whitney Portal Road. Map & Guide Photographer capturing Mobius Arch by Jim Pickering, Cover photo of photographers by Bob Wick Camping in campgrounds helps maintain the area’s great scenery and recreational opportunities. City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power lands in the area are open for day use only. y wa gh Hi Geology BLM Public Lands The rounded, oddly shaped contours of the Alabama of the Sierra Nevada. While both land forms consist of the same granitic rock, the fantastic shapes of the Private Lands hills were formed by a combination of natural chemical weathering and wind erosion. Maintained Road (suitable for passenger cars) er Man of Steel Campground Point of Interest bac Hog d kR Red-tailed hawk vie Mo Plants or at the Museum of Western Film History in Lone Pine. Lone Pine Film Festival. This festival features speakers, Scarlet milk-vetch Desert needlegrass Tuttle Creek Campground Confederate warship responsible for wreaking havoc during the Civil War. Prospectors sympathetic to the Confederate cause named their mining claims after the Alabama and eventually the name stuck. Alabama Hills with Mt. Whitney in the distance by David Kirk d oa sR The hills were named after the C.S.S. Alabama, a ow Inyo National Forest Film History Museum Lone Pine Reservation 136 Visitor Center ead crews, benefiting the local economy. Gunga Din Temple Site Barrel cactu
Bag limits, seasons of use, and size restriction of fish can be found on the same web site. Fisherman and Fire Wildfire can be both beneficial and devastating. It can wipe out homes and businesses as well as rejuvenate forested lands and riparian areas. It is always best to leave fire to the professionals and always make sure your campfires and burning items are completely out before you leave. Please remember to be very careful with fire. fishing accidents. Always be sure of your footing when walking or wading (and it is generally better for you and the aquatic species to stay out of the streams and rivers while fishing). Large and small wildlife (snakes and mosquitos) can Nutria be an annoyance when fishing. Be aware of your surroundings and watch where you step. Wear mosquito and bug repellant with deet to keep them from eating you alive. As always, be careful when driving to and from your secret fishing hole. When boating, always have a Quagga Mussels life vest handy (and kids under 15 must always wear a vest while in a boat per California State Law). Mother Lode Field Office (916) 941-3101 5152 Hillsdale Circle El Dorado Hills, CA 95762-5713 (El Dorado Co.) freshwater/license-information. fishermen and women are injured or lose their lives in Applegate Field Office (530) 233-4666 708 W. 12th Street Alturas, CA 96101-3130 (Modoc Co.) at http://www.eregulations.com/california/fishing/ opportunity, it can be dangerous as well. Every year, Surprise Field Station (530) 279-6101 602 Cressler St. phy./ P.O. Box 460 mlg. Cedarville, CA 96104-0460 (Modoc Co.) California. A listing of those requirements may be found Eurasian Milfoil Palm Springs Field Office (760) 833-7100 1201 Bird Center Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262-8001 (Riverside Co.) Freshwater Fishing license issued by the State of Hyacinth Needles Field Office (760) 326-7000 1303 So. Hwy. 95 Needles, CA 92363-4217 (San Bernardino Co.) Even though fishing is a tremendous recreational license, you are required to possess a California Arcata Field Office (707) 825-2300 1695 Heindon Road Arcata, CA 95521-4573 (Humboldt Co.) While you are not required to have a “BLM” fishing Aquatic Invasive Species include Bakersfield Field Office (661) 391-6000 3801 Pegasus Drive Bakersfield, CA 933086837 (Kern Co.) Safety Barstow Field Office (760) 252-6000 2601 Barstow Road Barstow, CA 92311-6653 (San Bernardino Co.) License Requirement water to another. Redding Field Office (530) 224-2100 6640 Lockheed Drive Redding, CA 96002 (Shasta Co.) Never release plants, animals, or fish into water bodies. Never move fish or plants or bait from one Bishop Field Office (760) 872-5000 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100 Bishop, CA 93514-3101 (Inyo Co.) Dry – Completely dry equipment and gear between visits to fresh water systems. Ridgecrest Field Office (760) 384-5400 300 So. Richmond Road Ridgecrest, CA 93555-4436 (Kern Co.) Drain – Empty coolers, bilge pumps, and buckets of all water before leaving a water body. Central Coast Office (831) 582-2200 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933-6009 (San Benito Co.) Clean – Rinse and remove all mud and plant materials from boats, fishing equipment, and clothing. Ukiah Field Office (707) 468-4000 2550 N. State Street Ukiah, CA 95482-5194 (Mendocino Co.) serious and irreversible harm to aquatic habitats in California if allowed to spread unchecked. Eagle Lake Field Office (530) 257-0456 2550 Riverside Drive Susanville, CA 96130-4710 (Lassen Co.) Take measures to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive plants and animals. They can cause El Centro Field Office (760) 337-4400 1661 So. 4th Street El Centro, CA 92243-4561 (Imperial Co.) Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species f you have any questions, feel free to contact ny of the following BLM offices in California: uestions? Catch and Release A large percent of California freshwater anglers are catch and release fishermen — meaning they are very careful with the fish after they catch them and they release them back to the water as quickly as possible. It is always a good thing to keep your fish in a “fish friendly” net in the water until you are ready to release it. Barbless hooks Leave No Trace How to photograph your catch Take only pictures and leave artifacts where you find them. The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 makes removal of cultural resources punishable by fines and jail time. When it’s a catch and release fish species or regulation, that creates a challenge for getting a photo of your prize catch. Remember if you’re in a catch and release scenario keep the fish in the water at all times and take the photo of you also harm fish less that barbed ones. The use of live bait holding the fish in the water. is also a detriment to catch and release fishing. Please If it’s a not catch and release and it’s a keeper then you remember, the fish you catch and release today may be can have it out of the water. the fish yo

also available

National Parks
USFS NW