"Point Arena-Stornetta unit of the California Coastal National Monument" by Bureau of Land Management California , public domain

California Coastal - Point Arena - Stornetta Unit

National Monument - California

The California Coastal National Monument is located along the entire coastline of the U.S. state of California. This monument ensures the protection of all islets, reefs and rock outcroppings along the coast of California within 12 nautical miles (22 km) of shore along the entire 1,100-mile (1,800 km) long California coastline.

maps

Visitor Map of the Point Arena - Stornetta Unit area in the California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Point Arena - Stornetta Unit

Visitor Map of the Point Arena - Stornetta Unit area in the California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Map and Guide of California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Map and Guide

Map and Guide of California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Junior Explorer Activity Book for California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Junior Explorer

Junior Explorer Activity Book for California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure of Point Arena-Stornetta Unit at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Point Arena-Stornetta Unit (mobile)

Brochure of Point Arena-Stornetta Unit at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure of Point Arena-Stornetta Unit at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Point Arena-Stornetta Unit

Brochure of Point Arena-Stornetta Unit at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure of Palos Verdes Peninsula at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Palos Verdes Peninsula

Brochure of Palos Verdes Peninsula at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure of Trinidad Gateway at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).California Coastal - Trinidad Gateway

Brochure of Trinidad Gateway at California Coastal National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM California - Freshwater Fishing

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

California Coastal - Point Arena - Stornetta Unit NM https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/california/california-coastal https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Coastal_National_Monument The California Coastal National Monument is located along the entire coastline of the U.S. state of California. This monument ensures the protection of all islets, reefs and rock outcroppings along the coast of California within 12 nautical miles (22 km) of shore along the entire 1,100-mile (1,800 km) long California coastline.
California Coastal National Monument Map & Guide Where Land and Sea Collide Waves explode onto offshore rocks, spraying whitewater into the air. Sea lions bark as they haul out of the surf onto the rocks, and a whirlwind of birds fly above. Millions of people gaze upon the California coastline and its stunning beauty year-round. Point Arena Lighthouse Connecting the Pacific Ocean with the land, the California Coastal National Monument provides a unique coastal habitat for marine-dependent wildlife and vegetation on more than 20,000 rocks, islands, exposed reefs and pinnacles along the California coastline. Nearly 8,000 acres of onshore public lands are also a part of the national monument: Trinidad Head, Waluplh-Lighthouse Ranch, Lost Coast Headlands, Point Arena-Stornetta, Cotoni-Coast Dairies, and Piedras Blancas. The offshore rocks and islands are a public resource and will remain protected for future generations, thanks to their special designation as a national monument. These rugged outposts provide a protected haven for plants and animals, especially those that are sensitive to human disturbance. A Home for Marine Mammals Coastal Heritage Several fin-footed marine mammal species, called Humans have had a presence on the California coast Do Your Part to Support Coastal Conservation pinnipeds, depend on the monument’s islands, rocks, for thousands of years, as the ocean provided food, The coastal environment is a fragile one. Here are reefs, and pinnacles for warming and resting, as well as raw materials, and transportation for the area’s original some important things you can do while enjoying the ocean around them for feeding. Harbor seals and inhabitant, Native Americans. The rocks and islands of the California Coastal National Monument to protect California sea lions are common around the monument, the national monument served as navigational aids (and this awe-inspiring place: and Steller sea lions and northern fur seals can sometimes impediments) for the early European explorers sometimes be seen. and later for fur traders and timber merchants. Today, • Don’t crush or remove sea stars, crabs, or other millions of people live along the coast and millions more animals. Life in the inter tidal zone is challenging visit every year. Sanderlingsp When tide pooling, watch where you step. enough without human interference. A Haven for Birds • Help marine wildlife by packing out what you bring to the beach. Plastic debris in the water A rock rising out of the ocean can be an important place can look a lot like food, which has huge impacts for birds to breed, lay eggs, or rest away from predators. to wildlife. An estimated 200,000 breeding seabirds rely on the • rocks and islands of the California Coastal National Volunteer with the BLM or one of our many coastal partners. There are opportunities for Monument. Keep an eye out for black oystercatchers, people of all ages to participate in citizen science pigeon guillemots, tufted puffins, several storm-petrel or stewardship of the monument’s natural species, and many other resources. birds making their • homes among Harbor seal the rocks. Piedras Blancas Light Station without disturbing the animals. Visitors can easily tell the difference between harbor seals and California sea lions by looking for two outward characteristics. Harbor seals do not have any external ears, while California sea lions do have ear flaps. Also, harbor seals wiggle and bounce along the land on their bellies, while sea lions can use their tails like a foot to travel on land. Double-crested Cormorant California sea lions Keep binoculars close by to capture great views Trinidad The California Coastal National Monument Stretches Onshore U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management The California Coastal National Monument also includes nearly 8,000 acres of public lands on the mainland. These lands give visitors a chance to see the monument’s seabirds, marine mammals, and tide pools, but and support their own unique plants and animals and offer other recreational opportunities. Black Oystercatcher Trinidad Head Lighthouse ` 1 Situated along the rugged Mendocino County coastline adjacent to the town of Point Arena, Point Arena-Stornetta offers spectacular views of coastal bluffs, sea arches, tide pools, the estuary of the Garcia River, sandy beaches and dunes with eight miles of marked paths. Trinidad Head Lighthouse is a small tower perched on a 175-foot shelf above sea level. The tower is still active, with an LED beacon mounted outside the lantern room. The BLM manages the historic lighthouse cooperatively with the City of Trinidad, the Trinidad Rancheria, the Trinidad Museum Society and the Yurok Tribe. WaluplhLighthouse Ranch The historic Point Arena Lighthouse provides a stunning backdrop to the area. 2 5 There is a short, easy interpretive trail along Table Bluff where visitors can discover why th
CCNM Trinidad Gateway Junior Explorer Activity Book 1 Welcome, Junior Explorer! dw sthaven D r oo We dH igh wa y BLM’s Junior Explorer program helps introduce young explorers like you to the lands and resources that the BLM manages. This activity book will introduce you to plants, animals, and history of the Trinidad Gateway to the California Coastal National Monument Re Mill Cree k . S t. Are you ready to have some fun!? 101 Read and complete all of the activities in this book. Feel free to have an adult help you. Scen Ocean Ave State Park Rd Mai n ic D r Take this book to the Arcata Field Office or the Trinidad Museum after you finish so that a BLM Ranger or volunteer can check your work. After you complete your book you will be sworn in as an official Junior Explorer and the certificate at the back of this book will be filled out and stamped. Edwards St Van Wyk e St This Activity Book Belongs To: ___________________________________________ What is a Junior Explorer? Legend Trinidad Museum and Native Plant Garden 5 Trinidad Rancheria Harbor and Pier Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse 6 Trinidad Head Trailhead 7 Trinidad Head Light Station 33 HSU Marine Lab 8 Trinidad State Park 4 Old Home Beach 9 Trinidad State Beach 1 22 CCNM Trinidad Gateway Junior Explorer Activity Book 2 • Junior Explorers explore the environment around them. • Junior Explorers care for plants, animals and the land. • Junior Explorers encourage others to care for the land and its inhabitants. CCNM Trinidad Gateway Junior Explorer Activity Book 3 Seabird C ha l l e n g e Q u i z California is home to an amazing population of seabirds. They like to gather in large groups on the offshore rocks and islands of the California Coastal National Monument. When people get too close, it interrupts their feeding, resting and caring for their chicks. Disturbing their daily activities leaves them wide open to predators. Be “seabird safe” and help California’s wildlife thrive! Common Murrelet Each correct answer is worth 1 point. Add up your total to find out “How Seabird Safe Am I?” 5 points Congratulations! You are seabird safe! 4 points Awesome! You know a lot about being seabird safe. 3 points Keep at it! You are on your way to being seabird safe. 0-2 points Try again. Please continue learning more about being seabird safe. Public Lands Belong To You! The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is a federal government agency that takes care of more than 245 million acres of land. Most of these lands are in the western part of the United States. These public lands belong to all Americans. Trinidad South View CCNM Trinidad Gateway Junior Explorer Activity Book 4 1. When seabirds have to leave their nest because of humans it can cause________ . feeding grooming eggs to fail 2. If birds have to fly away from their nest because they are afraid of a boater ________ . they may abandon their nest they will lay more eggs they will lose all their feathers 3. True or False: Dogs off leash that chase wildlife could hurt these wild animals chances of producing young. True False 4. True or False: It only take one close encounter with a human or dog for a seabird to abandon its nest. True False 5. True or False: Repeated human contact cause seabirds to become comfortable with being close to humans. True False CCNM CCNMTrinidad TrinidadGateway GatewayJunior JuniorExplorer ExplorerActivity ActivityBook Book Cormorant Pelican Oyster Catcher Credit: Jackie Gay 55 All stacked up How do you say Cher-Ae anyway? The name comes from the coastal Yurok village at Trinidad called Chue-rey (also spelled Tsurai). In the Yurok language, “ts” or “ch” makes a hard ch- sound as in chocolate. The “ae” makes an “ay” sound as in way. Head down to the Trinidad Pier and Harbor for a closer look at the California Coastal National Monument. What sounds can you hear from the pier? The rocks you see from the pier are called Sea stacks. Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Constant pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first, leaving harder, more resistant rock behind. ___________________________________________ Erosion happens when rocks and sediments are picked up and moved to another place by ice, water, wind or gravity. ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Traditionally the Yurok people subsisted on the abundant plants of the redwood forests including mushrooms, wild herbs and teas, and large game animals such as deer and elk. In addition, marine resources such as salmon, rock fish, surf fish, eels and seaweed, all caught or gathered along this ancestral coastline and contributed to their diet. Visit the Trinidad Pier and see if you can find these marine animals in the mural. ____________ ______________________________ List the wildlife you see fro
Point ArenaStornetta Unit California Coastal National Monument Map & Guide Situated along the rugged Mendocino County coastline adjacent to the town of Point Arena, is the 1,665-acre Point Arena-Stornetta Unit of the California shoreline unit of the Monument offers spectacular views of coastal bluffs, sea arches, the estuary of the Garcia River, and sandy beaches and dunes with eight miles of marked paths. The Point Arena-Stornetta Unit (Unit) was included as Monument by Presidential Proclamation on March 11, 2014. The Unit expands the Monument to include coastal bluffs and shelves, tide pools, onshore dunes, coastal prairies, riverbanks and the mouth and estuary of the Garcia River. Purpose for the designation was for the protection of important biological resources and Cover photo and lighthouse photo by Bob Wick, BLM habitats, cultural resources, geology and recreational use and access. The Unit is open for daytime activities including wildlife photography, and public access to the Mendocino Coast. The privately owned Point Arena Lighthouse can be accessed via Lighthouse Road (county road), which runs through the area at the north end. The California Coastal National Monument was established on January 11, 2000, and comprises more than 20,000 rocks, reefs, and islands spread along the 1,100 mile California coastline. These dramatic features contribute to California’s awe-inspiring coastal of seabirds and marine mammals. The Monument protects feeding and nesting habitat for an estimated breeding pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). Packed with Human History by the Bokeya or Central Pomo tribe. The ocean played mammals, and seaweed were gathered from the ocean and coast for food. From the land, vegetables, berries, roots and greens were gathered and mammals and birds hunted. The Bokeya traded items from the coast for acorns, buckeye, and pine nuts found further inland. During the late 1800s, the town of Flumeville or Rollerville was located roughly at the intersection of Lighthouse Rd. and Highway 1. This small settlement helped move timber from the interior forests via the chute to sailing ships at Point Arena Harbor. Cattle troughs, a milk barn, and road system from the early 1900s remain as evidence of dairy operations. Joseph Sheppard established a Jersey dairy farm on portions of this area in the late 1800s. Around 1924, A.O. Stornetta purchased the ranch from the widow of Joseph Sheppard. Stornetta was known for combining local dairy operations. Harvesting and threshing, Sheppard Ranch circa 1900 Photo courtesy of Held-Poage Research Library, No. L-02236 Point Arena Lighthouse Tower—1870 Pictured—The original lighthouse tower in the year it was opened. Constructed of brick and mortar in 1869, the tower housed a First Order Fresnel Lens. The tower was 100 feet tall. The great earthquake Photo courtesy of Point Arena Lighthouse of 1906 damaged the lighthouse beyond repair and destroyed the lens. It is speculated that the spiral staircase prevented the tower from collapsing. The original staircase is still in use today inside the second tower. Photo courtesy of Point Arena Lighthouse feet long and 55 feet at the beam. She was built in the United Kingdom by the Blythswood Shipbuilding Company and owned by the Norfolk and North American Steamship Company and commanded by Captain Cogle. Launched in 1927, the ship ran aground in a heavy fog off Point Arena Lighthouse on September 9, 1949 carrying a cargo of wheat, lumber, canned salmon and metals. Leave No Trace • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience. • Respect all wildlife, including marine life. If animals notice your presence, you are too close. • Please do not deface, carve, or write on trees or rocks. • Leave all natural and cultural resources in place, including artifacts, vegetation, mushrooms, animals, driftwood, or shells. • Trash—Pack out everything you pack in. Including food scraps and any small “micro-trash” such as cigarette butts. Safety/Caution Whether hiking, wildlife viewing or driving, your safety depends on your good judgment, adequate preparation, and constant awareness. Your safety is your responsibility. Lighthouse Road is narrow with pedestrian and cattle crossing—reduce your speed. Turning around Weather Weather on the North Coast can be changeable with fog, wind, rain or sun. Dress in layers for your comfort and changing conditions while visiting the area. Water Carry enough water per person for hiking. Water is not available on site. Cooler coastal temperatures are deceiving and you can still become dehydrated. Coastal Cliffs Cliffs/bluffs are unstable—do not climb. Be careful of edges when using a camera, viewing wildlife, or just walking. Due to wind, water, and wave action, the edges may be undercut and not visible from the top of the bluff. These conditions are ever-changing and may not be marked. Wildlife The Unit is home to nine special status species, insects. Commonly seen
Conserving Our Lands Situated along the rugged Mendocino National Conservation Lands, including the California County coastline adjacent to the town Coastal National Monument, are part of an active, of Point Arena, is the 1,665-acre Point vibrant landscape where people live, work, and play. They offer exceptional opportunities for recreation, solitude, wildlife viewing, exploring history, scientific research, and a wide range of traditional uses. blm.gov/ca/ccnm California Coastal National Monument Point Arena-Stornetta Unit Arena-Stornetta Unit of the California Coastal National Monument. The first shoreline unit of the Monument offers spectacular views of coastal bluffs, sea arches, the estuary of the Garcia River, and sandy beaches and dunes with eight miles of marked paths. In an Emergency The Point Arena-Stornetta Unit (Unit) was included as • Call 9-1-1 the first shoreline unit of the California Coastal National • Mendocino County Sheriff (707) 964-6308 Monument by Presidential Proclamation on March • Nearest hospital is 44 miles north on Hwy 1. Mendocino Coast Hospital, 700 River Drive, Fort Bragg, CA (707) 961-1234 11, 2014. The Unit expands the Monument to include coastal bluffs and shelves, tide pools, onshore dunes, habitats, cultural resources, geology and recreational use and access. The Unit is open for daytime activities including wildlife viewing, hiking, bird watching, fishing, picnicking, nature photography, and public access to the Mendocino Coast. The privately owned Point Arena Lighthouse can be accessed via Lighthouse Road (county road), which runs through the area at the north end. The California Coast National Monument was established on January 11, 2000, and comprises more than 20,000 rocks, reefs, and islands spread along the 1,100 mile California coastline. These dramatic features contribute to California’s awe-inspiring coastal scenery and provide havens for significant populations of seabirds and marine mammals. The Monument protects feeding and nesting habitat for an estimated 200,000 breeding seabirds and thousands of loafing and breeding pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). coastal prairies, riverbanks and the mouth and estuary of the Garcia River. Purpose for the designation was for the protection of important biological resources and Contact Us Bureau of Land Management Ukiah Field Office 2550 North State Street Ukiah, CA 95482 (707) 468-4000 blm.gov/ca/ukiah California Coastal National Monument blm.gov/ca/ccnm Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter blm.gov/ca Map & Guide BLM/CA/GI-2015/009+8300 Packed with Human History Cover photo and lighthouse photo by Bob Wick, BLM Point Arena Lighthouse Tower—1870 Pictured—The original When Europeans first arrived, the area was inhabited lighthouse tower in the by the Bokeya or Central Pomo tribe. The ocean played year it was opened. an important part of the Bokeya life. Fish , shellfish, sea Constructed of brick mammals, and seaweed were gathered from the ocean and mortar in 1869, the and coast for food. From the land, vegetables, berries, tower housed a First roots and greens were gathered and mammals and Order Fresnel Lens. The birds hunted. The Bokeya traded items from the coast tower was 100 feet tall. for acorns, buckeye, and pine nuts found further inland. During the late 1800s, the town of Flumeville or Rollerville was located roughly at the intersection of Lighthouse Rd. and Highway 1. This small settlement helped move timber from the interior forests via the Garcia River with a system of flumes (trough-like channels filled with water), a narrow gauge railroad, and chute to sailing ships at Point Arena Harbor. The great earthquake Photo courtesy of Point Arena Lighthouse of 1906 damaged the lighthouse beyond repair and destroyed the lens. Leave No Trace • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience. • Respect all wildlife, including marine life. If animals notice your presence, you are too close. • Please do not deface, carve, or write on trees or rocks. • Leave all natural and cultural resources in place, including artifacts, vegetation, mushrooms, animals, driftwood, or shells. be marked. Wildlife The Unit is home to nine special status species, including plants, mammals, birds, amphibians, fish and insects. Commonly seen marine animals include harbor seals seen loafing on the rocks and migrating gray whales. • Trash—Pack out everything you pack in. Including food scraps and any small “micro-trash” such as cigarette butts. Safety/Caution It is speculated that the spiral staircase prevented the Whether hiking, wildlife viewing or driving, your safety tower from collapsing. The original staircase is still in depends on your good judgment, adequate preparation, use today inside the second tower. and constant awareness. Your safety is your responsibility. Pacific Enterprise Lighthouse Road is narrow with pedestrian and Cattle troughs, a milk barn
Your Coastal Riches California Coastal National Monument, under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, is recognized as a unique biological treasure. How can I learn more? Bureau of Land Management California Coastal National Monument 940 2nd Avenue Marina, Ca 93933 Hours: 7:30 am - 4:00 pm M-F (831)582-2200 https://www.blm.gov/visit/california-coastal-national-monument A crucial part of a fragile ecosystem, the Monument is comprised of six mainland units and more than 20,000 small islands, rocks, exposed reefs, and pinnacles (the portion above mean high tide) located off the 1,100 miles of the California coastline. BLM Palm Springs-South Coast Field Office These rocks and small islands supply shelter and nutrients for thousands of organisms and provide important breeding grounds and nesting areas for thousands of seabirds, including cormorants, gulls, murres, petrels and auklets. The brown pelican relies on the Monument’s rocks and islands for critical resting and roosting habitat. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Several California marine mammal species depend on the Monument’s rocks, islands and exposed reefs, as well as the ocean resources around them, for forage and breeding grounds. Harbor seals and California sea lions are common occupants of the Monument. In addition, the Monument includes a significant amount of the rocky coastal ecosystems and portions of the intertidal zone. Enjoy this spectacular interplay of land and sea! 1201 Bird Center Dr., Palm Springs, CA 92262 (760)833-7100 Cabrillo Marine Aquarium (310)548-7562 www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org California Coastal Commission 1-800-COAST 4-U (262-7848) www.coastal.ca.gov South Coast Region 5 3883 Ruffin Road, San Diego, CA 92123 (858)467-4201 www.wildlife.ca.gov City of Rancho Palos Verdes Abalone Cove Shoreline Park & Ecological Reserve (310)377-5370 or (310)377-1222 www.rpvca,gov National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration/ NOAA (202)482-6090 www.noaa.gov Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy (310)541-7613 www.pvplc.org Point Vicente Interpretive Center 31501 Palos Verdes Drive West, in Rancho Palos Verdes (310)377-5370 Open Daily 10 am-5 pm www.losserenos.org How can I protect the sea life here? * Cut six pack rings before throwing them away. Better yet, recycle them! The birds will thank you! * Avoid disturbing birds near roosting and nesting areas when boating or kayaking. The mission of California Coastal National Monument is to protect and foster an appreciation and stewardship for the unique coastal resources associated with California Coastal National Monument. * This Monument is managed in partnership with the Marine Protected Area network. It is your responsibility to know the designated boundaries and associated recreational use. Taking or possessing tide pool animals is against the law. No collecting. Palos Verdes Peninsula California Coastal National Monument Six Peninsula Highlights California Coastal National Monument on the Palos Verdes Peninsula  Royal Palms County Beach  Bluff Cove Overlook (City of Palos Verdes Estates) (Los Angeles County) Western Ave & Paseo del Mar, San Pedro. Parking and overlook at 1300 Paseo del Mar just off Palos Verdes Drive West. Located at the north end of Palos Verdes Peninsula, this is part of Palos Verdes Estates Shoreline Preserve. The overlook offers a stunning view of California Coastal National Monument rocks, Bluff Cove, and the coast area of the Santa Monica Bay. Flat Rock, Bit Rock and others at the north end of Bluff Cove are the surface expression of underwater ridges and reefs. The cove is a wintering area for shorebirds such as willets, marbled godwits, and plovers.  Point Vicente Interpretive Center (City of Rancho Palos Verdes) Located on Palos Verdes Drive West, north side of U.S. Coast Guard’s Point Vicente Station. This is a great place to take the family. The Interpretive Center is free and open daily to view displays on geology, marine life, the kelp forest, and human history of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. A book store and gift shop are adjacent. Point Vicente is high above the rocky shore and popular for viewing Pacific gray whale migration from December to mid-May. Picnic areas, a bluff top walkway, and parking are available. For guided tours of the Interpretive Center, local trails and tide pools call (310)377-5370. The historic Point Vicente Lighthouse is adjacent. Lighthouse tours are available. Call (310)541-0334 for a schedule and for more information. Photos T. Albrecht, V. Ortiz , B. Wick and Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy This is an inviting place to see marine life, an interpretive center, and ruins of the 1915 Royal Palms Hotel. Rocky reefs beneath the kelp canopy provide habitat for marine life such as moray eels, sea cucumbers, giant keyhole limpets and California sheephead. The cove is also a popular surfing spot. Parking and restrooms are available. There is a
For more information, contact these Trinidad Gateway partners, who are working together to help protect and provide for public enjoyment of this unique part of the California coastline: Bureau of Land Management Arcata Field Office www.blm.gov/ca/arcata (707) 825-2300 California Coastal National Monument www.blm.gov/ca/pa/coastal_monument/ California Department of Fish and Game www.dfg.ca.gov/MRD (707) 445-6493 California State Parks North Coast Redwoods District www.parks.ca.gov (707) 445-6547 Trinidad Museum Society 400 Main Street Trinidad, CA 95570 Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria www.trinidad-rancheria.org (707) 677-0211 Tsurai Ancestral Society P. O. Box 62 Trinidad, CA 95570 Yurok Tribe www.yuroktribe.org (707) 482-1350 City of Trinidad www.trinidad.ca.gov (707) 677-0223 HSU Marine Lab 570 Ewing Street Trinidad, CA 95570 www.humboldt.edu/~marinelb/ Photos c by Bob Wick; Illustrations c by Gary Bloomfield; Design by Chris Lohoefener of the Natural Resources Services Division of Redwood Community Action Agency, with assistance from the Trinidad Museum Society, City of Trinidad, California Department of Fish and Game, Yurok Tribe and the Cher-Ae Heights Trinidad Rancheria CALIFORNIA COASTAL NATIONAL MONUMENT - TRINIDAD GATEWAY - Explore the Trinidad Coast BLM The California Coastal National Monument is a part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) National Landscape Conservation System. TRINIDAD’S ROCKY RICHES To Crescent City Welcome to Trinidad’s lovely, lonely coast. Here, dark spruce and redwood-cloaked ridges tumble onto coastal cliffs and hidden coves as Pacific waves explode against the offshore rocks and headlands. Trinidad’s majestic sea stacks are part of the California Coastal National Monument, a string of more than 20,000 rocks and small islands off the state’s 1,100 mile-long coastline. The National Monument was designated to protect the offshore rocks’ significant scenic and ecological values, and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management and its partners. Big Lagoon County Park Patrick’s Point State Park C a l i f o r n i a Trinidad see map inside The Trinidad area is one of the most spectacular and pristine segments of the California coast, and has been established as a California Coastal National Monument Gateway – an area that offers the best shore-based opportunities to discover and view offshore rocks and islands and their inhabitants. As you begin your coastal discovery, please remember that this is a unique and extremely fragile environment – tread lightly, view wildlife from Luffenholtz Beach a distance, and always respect your Houda Point surroundings. Moonstone Beach At very low tides, one can walk between Houda Point and Moonstone Beach. There is a walk-in sea cave, a waterfall that tumbles into the surf, numerous marine birds and rocky pools full of sea life. Clam Beach To Arcata/Eureka TSURAI: YUROK TRIBE’S COASTAL VILLAGE FROM CONTACT TO COMMERCE T he Yurok The canoe is a symbol of life and is important to the Yurok people for travel, food gathering, and religious ceremonies. A large part of the Yurok culture is centered along the water's edge, and ancestral villages are concen trated along the coast and Klamath River. Tsurai, meaning mountain, is the southernmost permanent village within Yurok territory. The village domain extends north from Trinidad Head (Tsurewa) to Beach Creek (O prmrg wroi) several miles up the coast, and south to Little River (Me'tsko or Srepor). Just as in the past, the Tsurai Village, Tsurewa, and the offshore rocks continue to be components of the Yurok cultural landscape embedded with deep cultural, historical, and spiritual significance to the Tsurais of the Yurok people. inhabitants of Tsurai first made contact with Europeans when explorers Hezeta and Bodega anchored in the bay and claimed the harbor for Spain on Trinity (Trinidad) Sunday in 1775. Over the next 75 years, British, Russian, and Spanish ships landed here for refuge, exploration, and sea otter hunting. American settlement began in 1850, when Trinidad became a port of entry to the Trinity River gold diggings. Since then, Trinidad harbor has hosted lumber and fishing fleets, and even served as a whaling port during the 1920s, processing up to 300 humpback whales a year. Today the harbor facilities are owned and operated by the Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria, and support a modest commercial and recreational fishing fleet, focusing mainly on salmon and dungeness crab. If you take a stroll down the Trinidad Pier, you might see some of these fishermen bringing in their catch. AN EVER-CHANGING LANDSCAPE I t’s easy to imagine the pounding ocean waves and rushing coastal streams wearing away the area’s bluffs and beaches, but hidden far under the surface, even more powerful forces are at work as active faults squeeze, fracture, and uplift the same landscape. These natural processes continually reshape
Bag limits, seasons of use, and size restriction of fish can be found on the same web site. Fisherman and Fire Wildfire can be both beneficial and devastating. It can wipe out homes and businesses as well as rejuvenate forested lands and riparian areas. It is always best to leave fire to the professionals and always make sure your campfires and burning items are completely out before you leave. Please remember to be very careful with fire. fishing accidents. Always be sure of your footing when walking or wading (and it is generally better for you and the aquatic species to stay out of the streams and rivers while fishing). Large and small wildlife (snakes and mosquitos) can Nutria be an annoyance when fishing. Be aware of your surroundings and watch where you step. Wear mosquito and bug repellant with deet to keep them from eating you alive. As always, be careful when driving to and from your secret fishing hole. When boating, always have a Quagga Mussels life vest handy (and kids under 15 must always wear a vest while in a boat per California State Law). Mother Lode Field Office (916) 941-3101 5152 Hillsdale Circle El Dorado Hills, CA 95762-5713 (El Dorado Co.) freshwater/license-information. fishermen and women are injured or lose their lives in Applegate Field Office (530) 233-4666 708 W. 12th Street Alturas, CA 96101-3130 (Modoc Co.) at http://www.eregulations.com/california/fishing/ opportunity, it can be dangerous as well. Every year, Surprise Field Station (530) 279-6101 602 Cressler St. phy./ P.O. Box 460 mlg. Cedarville, CA 96104-0460 (Modoc Co.) California. A listing of those requirements may be found Eurasian Milfoil Palm Springs Field Office (760) 833-7100 1201 Bird Center Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262-8001 (Riverside Co.) Freshwater Fishing license issued by the State of Hyacinth Needles Field Office (760) 326-7000 1303 So. Hwy. 95 Needles, CA 92363-4217 (San Bernardino Co.) Even though fishing is a tremendous recreational license, you are required to possess a California Arcata Field Office (707) 825-2300 1695 Heindon Road Arcata, CA 95521-4573 (Humboldt Co.) While you are not required to have a “BLM” fishing Aquatic Invasive Species include Bakersfield Field Office (661) 391-6000 3801 Pegasus Drive Bakersfield, CA 933086837 (Kern Co.) Safety Barstow Field Office (760) 252-6000 2601 Barstow Road Barstow, CA 92311-6653 (San Bernardino Co.) License Requirement water to another. Redding Field Office (530) 224-2100 6640 Lockheed Drive Redding, CA 96002 (Shasta Co.) Never release plants, animals, or fish into water bodies. Never move fish or plants or bait from one Bishop Field Office (760) 872-5000 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100 Bishop, CA 93514-3101 (Inyo Co.) Dry – Completely dry equipment and gear between visits to fresh water systems. Ridgecrest Field Office (760) 384-5400 300 So. Richmond Road Ridgecrest, CA 93555-4436 (Kern Co.) Drain – Empty coolers, bilge pumps, and buckets of all water before leaving a water body. Central Coast Office (831) 582-2200 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933-6009 (San Benito Co.) Clean – Rinse and remove all mud and plant materials from boats, fishing equipment, and clothing. Ukiah Field Office (707) 468-4000 2550 N. State Street Ukiah, CA 95482-5194 (Mendocino Co.) serious and irreversible harm to aquatic habitats in California if allowed to spread unchecked. Eagle Lake Field Office (530) 257-0456 2550 Riverside Drive Susanville, CA 96130-4710 (Lassen Co.) Take measures to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive plants and animals. They can cause El Centro Field Office (760) 337-4400 1661 So. 4th Street El Centro, CA 92243-4561 (Imperial Co.) Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species f you have any questions, feel free to contact ny of the following BLM offices in California: uestions? Catch and Release A large percent of California freshwater anglers are catch and release fishermen — meaning they are very careful with the fish after they catch them and they release them back to the water as quickly as possible. It is always a good thing to keep your fish in a “fish friendly” net in the water until you are ready to release it. Barbless hooks Leave No Trace How to photograph your catch Take only pictures and leave artifacts where you find them. The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 makes removal of cultural resources punishable by fines and jail time. When it’s a catch and release fish species or regulation, that creates a challenge for getting a photo of your prize catch. Remember if you’re in a catch and release scenario keep the fish in the water at all times and take the photo of you also harm fish less that barbed ones. The use of live bait holding the fish in the water. is also a detriment to catch and release fishing. Please If it’s a not catch and release and it’s a keeper then you remember, the fish you catch and release today may be can have it out of the water. the fish yo

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