Butano

State Park - California

Butano State Park is showcasing a secluded redwood-filled canyon. Located in San Mateo County near Pescadero, the 4,728-acre (1,913 ha) park was established in 1956. The park features miles of hiking trails, 21 drive-in campsites and 18 walk-in campsites. Restrooms with running water are provided. Drinking water is available at the park in both the campground and in the day use areas. There are no showers. Butano also has a backpacking site along a trail 5.5 miles (8.9 km) up from the entrance. There is no water at the site but there is water nearby from seasonal streams. Guided nature walk and weekend campfire programs are offered during the summer.

brochures

Brochure of Butano State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Butano - Brochure

Brochure of Butano State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure of Butano State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Butano - Brochure

Brochure of Butano State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Campground Map of Butano State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Butano - Campground Map

Campground Map of Butano State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=536 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butano_State_Park Butano State Park is showcasing a secluded redwood-filled canyon. Located in San Mateo County near Pescadero, the 4,728-acre (1,913 ha) park was established in 1956. The park features miles of hiking trails, 21 drive-in campsites and 18 walk-in campsites. Restrooms with running water are provided. Drinking water is available at the park in both the campground and in the day use areas. There are no showers. Butano also has a backpacking site along a trail 5.5 miles (8.9 km) up from the entrance. There is no water at the site but there is water nearby from seasonal streams. Guided nature walk and weekend campfire programs are offered during the summer.
Our Mission Butano State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (650) 879-2040. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Butano State Park 1500 Cloverdale Road Pescadero, CA 94060 (650) 879-2040 © 2003 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) Visitors to Butano, astonished at the breathtaking beauty of this park’s lush central canyon, have just begun their adventure. B utano State Park, situated in the Santa Cruz Mountains midway between Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay, is prized for the diversity of its habitats and wildlife, and for the depth of its solitude. Many visitors to Butano — thought to be named after a drinking cup made from a bull’s horn — find it the perfect place to shed everyday stresses. Nature’s vital processes can be seen everywhere. The unusual bend of a redwood tree tells the story of a long-ago earthquake. Elsewhere, the root of an alder tree begins eight feet up its trunk before reaching the ground, revealing the history of flooding in this area. The Candelabra redwood tree, with five huge branches jutting upright parallel to the trunk, is an odd natural phenomenon on a parcel recently added to the park. Those who take the time to stroll along a park trail or set up a tent will discover the beauty and solace of one of California’s leastknown parks. park Native People The human and natural histories of Butano State Park are closely linked. Though the indigenous people profoundly altered the natural landscape, they both depended upon and had intimate knowledge of it. When the first Spanish explorers reached California after 1769, what is now Butano State Park lay within the territory of the Quiroste tribe — a large group of Native Americans who had settled the area many thousands of years before. The Quiroste hunted game, harvested plant foods, dined on a great variety of seafoods, and sold coastal resources to their inland neighbors using shell beads as money. In autumn, the people burned large tracts of meadowlands to manage the foods they ate — especially hazelnuts and acorns. The fires improved plants that fed the deer, pronghorn, and tule elk they hunted. Their once-managed landscape has reverted to wilderness. In the San Francisco and Monterey Bay regions, the Quiroste numbered among more than fifty tribes whose descendants are today called the Ohlone. European Settlement European migration brought new settlers to the region, beginning with the 1769 Portolá expedition. The new crops and grazing animals cultivated by these settlers decimated traditional Quiroste food sources, so most of the Quiroste gave up their land and were taken into the Spanish mission system. Some Quiroste hid in the mountains. After the missions were secularized in 1834, the land passed into private hands. Redwood Logging and Preservation In the late 1860s, three families resided in the area — the Jacksons, Taylors, and Mullens. These settlers and a man named Purdy Pharis logged the canyon, NATURAL HISTORY Redwoods get about 30 percent of their vital moisture from fog. As the Earth’s climate warms, reduced fog threatens the redwoods’ long-term survival. Butano State Park harbors six distinct natural communities — each named for its most prominent natural features. Redwood / Douglas-Fir Forest — Much of the interior of Little Butano Canyon is dominated by towering redwoods and mossy Douglas-firs. Huckleberry bushes top the stumps of fallen redwoods. Western wake-robin and false Solomon’s seal bloom at ankle height. Purple calypso orchids bloom from February to April. Redwoods hollowed out by ancient forest fires provide homes for bats. In wet weather, watch out for newts and banana slugs along the trails through the ground cover. Look for tiny pacific wrens, nearly invisible until their resonant songs give away their locations among the logs and stumps. Coastal Grassland—The entrance area is grassland dominated by bush lupine and coyote brush. Blue-eyed grass and coastal suncups grow here. Sunrise and sunset are the best times to see such predators as bobcats and coyotes. Alder Woodland—The first half-mile of Little Butano Creek is shaded by alders. Under their canopy, blackberries, stinging nettles, elderberries, dogwoods, and willows provide food and shelter for insects, small mammals, reptiles, and a variety of birds. Trout, crayfish, and endangered red
Our Mission Butano State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (650) 879-2040. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Butano State Park 1500 Cloverdale Road Pescadero, CA 94060 (650) 879-2040 © 2003 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) Visitors to Butano, astonished at the breathtaking beauty of this park’s lush central canyon, have just begun their adventure. B utano State Park, situated in the Santa Cruz Mountains midway between Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay, is prized for the diversity of its habitats and wildlife, and for the depth of its solitude. Many visitors to Butano  —  thought to be named after a drinking cup made from a bull’s horn  —  find it the perfect place to shed everyday stresses. Nature’s vital processes can be seen everywhere. The unusual bend of a redwood tree tells the story of a long-ago earthquake. Elsewhere, the root of an alder tree begins eight feet up its trunk before reaching the ground, revealing the history of flooding in this area. The Candelabra redwood tree, with five huge branches jutting upright parallel to the trunk, is an odd natural phenomenon on a parcel recently added to the park. Those who take the time to stroll along a park trail or set up a tent will discover the beauty and solace of one of California’s leastknown parks. park HISTORY Native People The human and natural histories of Butano State Park are closely linked. Though the indigenous people profoundly altered the natural landscape, they both depended upon and had intimate knowledge of it. When the first Spanish explorers reached California after 1769, what is now Butano State Park lay within the territory of the Quiroste tribe   —   a large group of Native Americans who had settled the area many thousands of years before. The Quiroste hunted game, harvested plant foods, dined on a great variety of seafoods, and sold coastal resources to their inland neighbors using shell beads as money. In autumn, the people burned large tracts of meadowlands to manage the foods they ate  —  especially hazelnuts and acorns. The fires improved plants that fed the deer, pronghorn, and tule elk they hunted. Their once-managed landscape has reverted to wilderness. In the San Francisco and Monterey Bay regions, the Quiroste numbered among more than fifty tribes whose descendants are today called the Ohlone. European Settlement European migration brought new settlers to the region, beginning with the 1769 Portolá expedition. The new crops and grazing animals cultivated by these settlers decimated traditional Quiroste food sources, so most of the Quiroste gave up their land and were taken into the Spanish mission system. Some Quiroste hid in the mountains. After the missions were secularized in 1834, the land passed into private hands. Redwood Logging and Preservation In the late 1860s, three families resided in the area  —  the Jacksons, Taylors, and Mullens. These settlers and a man named Purdy Pharis logged the canyon, NATURAL HISTORY Redwoods get about 30 percent of their vital moisture from fog. As the Earth’s climate warms, reduced fog threatens the redwoods’ long-term survival. Butano State Park harbors six distinct natural communities  —  each named for its most prominent natural features. Redwood / Douglas-Fir Forest  — Much of the interior of Little Butano Canyon is dominated by towering redwoods and mossy Douglas-firs. Huckleberry bushes top the stumps of fallen redwoods. Western wake-robin and false Solomon’s seal bloom at ankle height. Purple calypso orchids bloom from February to April. Redwoods hollowed out by ancient forest fires provide homes for bats. In wet weather, watch out for newts and banana slugs along the trails through the ground cover. Look for tiny winter wrens, nearly invisible until their resonant songs give away their locations among the logs and stumps. Coastal Grassland  — The entrance area is grassland dominated by bush lupine and coyote brush. Blue-eyed grass and coastal suncups grow here. Sunrise and sunset are the best times to see such predators as bobcats and coyotes. Alder Woodland  — The first half-mile of Little Butano Creek is shaded by alders. Under their canopy, blackberries, stinging nettles, elderberries, dogwoods, and willows provide food and shelter for insects, small mammals, reptiles, and a variety of birds. Trout,
Butano State Park Ben Ries Campground 1500 Cloverdale Road • Pescadero, CA 94060 • (650) 879-2040 Located in a secluded, redwood-filled canyon, Butano State Park features 40 miles of hiking trails, 20 drive-in campsites, 18 walk-in campsites, and a backcountry trail camp. Restrooms with running water are provided. Drinking water is available in both the campground and the day-use areas. There are no showers. Guided nature walks as well as Junior Ranger and weekend campfire programs are offered during the summer. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Fees include one vehicle. Extra vehicles will be charged a per-night fee, with a maximum of three vehicles per drive-in campsite. Walk-in campsites are allowed one vehicle per site. CAMPGROUND SCHEDULE: The campground is closed December 1 through March 31. Campsites are available for reservation by calling (800) 444-7275 or visiting www.parks.ca.gov. All reservations are site-specific. OCCUPANCY: Eight people maximum are allowed per campsite. VEHICLE PARKING: Vehicles may be parked only in your assigned campsite. They must not extend onto the pavement. Extra vehicles must be parked in the overflow parking below the campground. CAMPSITES: The Ben Reis campground is a crumb-clean area. All food and garbage must be properly stored in the food lockers provided unless in immediate use. Please place tents within campsite limits. Tying/nailing hammocks or objects to trees causes damage and is not allowed. CHECK-IN TIME is 2 p.m. Reserved sites will be posted at the entrance station by noon the day of arrival. Visitors without a reservation may self-register for one night only into an unreserved campsite when park staff are not present. CHECK-OUT TIME is 12 noon. Please vacate your site by that time. CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS can be made as far as 7 months or as few as 48 hours in advance. TRAIL CAMP: We offer eight undeveloped, hike-in campsites. These sites are approximately 5 ½ miles from the park entrance. No campfires or dogs are allowed. Self-contained campfire stoves are permitted. Seasonal streams are generally available for pumping water. A pit toilet is provided. All sites are subject to reservations. Trail camp reservations can be made by calling (831) 338-8861, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. Watch for pedestrians and wildlife, including hard-to-see California newts (salamanders) and banana slugs. DOGS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under human control at all times. They are allowed only on paved roads, fire roads, picnic areas, and in your campsite. Except for service animals, dogs are not permitted on single-track trails. Dogs must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night. Do not leave your dog unattended in the campground. Please clean up after your pets. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. Voices, radios, and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite. GENERATORS may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. BICYCLES are allowed only on paved roads and fire roads. Single-track trails are closed to bikes and horses. Bicycle riders under age 18 must wear a helmet by law. CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. RULES AND REGULATIONS, CONTINUED FIRES/FIREWOOD: Fires are only allowed in fire rings provided. Camp stoves are permitted. Collecting dead or downed wood is prohibited. Purchase firewood from the camp host or at the kiosk. Fireworks are prohibited. LOADED FIREARMS AND HUNTING are not allowed. Possession of loaded firearms or air rifles is prohibited. GAMES/ACTIVITIES: For safety and resource protection, such games as ball, horseshoes, For Emergencies Dial 911. badminton, and similar activities are not allowed in the park. WILDLIFE: Please do not interfere with or feed park wildlife. Sensitive species and habitats are present throughout the park. DAY USE offers upright barbecue grills, picnic tables, and pit toilets. Picnic tables in the campground are only for registered campers. Day use is open from sunrise to sunset. Butano State Park—Ben Ries Campground © 2014 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) to park entrance, overflow parking Legend Paved Road Campfire Center Fire Road Drinking Water Trail Locked Gate Campground Parking Campground: Hike & Bike Restrooms

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