Chino Hills

State Park - California

Chino Hills State Park is located in the Chino Hills, foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains. It is a critical link in the Chino–Puente Hills wildlife corridor, and a major botanical habitat reserve for resident and migrating wildlife. Visitors can walk, horseback ride, or mountain bike on trails through valleys and along ridge tops through woodlands, sage scrub and grasslands. 60 miles (97 km) of trails and fire roads also offer opportunities for viewing wildlife and native plants. Facilities consist of a picnic area, camping sites, equestrian staging area and corrals, a historic barn, water and restrooms. Most of the trails are multiple mode use. A few trails are designated for hiking only for safety or habitat protection.

brochures

Brochure of Chino Hills State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Chino Hills - Brochure

Brochure of Chino Hills State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Chino Hills State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Chino Hills - Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Chino Hills State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=648 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chino_Hills_State_Park Chino Hills State Park is located in the Chino Hills, foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains. It is a critical link in the Chino–Puente Hills wildlife corridor, and a major botanical habitat reserve for resident and migrating wildlife. Visitors can walk, horseback ride, or mountain bike on trails through valleys and along ridge tops through woodlands, sage scrub and grasslands. 60 miles (97 km) of trails and fire roads also offer opportunities for viewing wildlife and native plants. Facilities consist of a picnic area, camping sites, equestrian staging area and corrals, a historic barn, water and restrooms. Most of the trails are multiple mode use. A few trails are designated for hiking only for safety or habitat protection.
Our Mission Chino Hills State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Chino Hills State Park is an island of tranquility in a sea of urbanization. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (951) 780-6222. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Chino Hills State Park 4721 Sapphire Road Chino Hills, CA 91709 (951) 780-6222 www.parks.ca.gov/ChinoHillsSP © 2002 California State Parks (Rev. 2018) C hino Hills State Park, a premier natural open-space area in the hills around the Santa Ana Canyon near Riverside, is a critical link in the Puente-Chino Hills biological corridor. This “bio-link” stretches nearly 31 miles from the Santa Ana Mountains to the Whittier Hills. The park has more than 14,000 acres of rolling, grassy hills and valleys, dotted with stands of oaks and sycamores. The park is also a place where people can escape everyday pressures to find peace and solitude in a natural setting. Visitors can camp for a few days or enjoy walking, horseback riding, or bicycling over trails that meander along ridge tops and through valleys, woodlands, sage scrub, and grasslands. More than 90 miles of trails offer excellent opportunities for viewing wildlife and native plants. The park features a visitor center, a campground, picnic areas, and equestrian facilities. PARK HISTORy Over the centuries, many people have made use of the open spaces and plentiful water, plant, and animal resources of the Chino Hills. Before European contact, the Tongva (Gabrielino) Indians, who lived along the Santa Ana River basin, set up temporary camps here for gathering food. After the Spanish founded Mission San Gabriel in 1771, the Chino Hills were used extensively for grazing by mission cattle. During the Mexican Republic era, the hills were used as spillover pasture from such surrounding Mexican ranchos as Santa Ana del Chino and La Sierra Yorba. After Mexico ceded California to the United States in 1848, the land continued to be used for cattle. Private land acquisition here began in the 1870s and continued into the 1890s. Some late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century oil exploration and mining activity also took place in areas now within the park. In 1948 the 1,720-acre Rolling M Ranch was established, and the land was leased to nearby landowners for cattle grazing. A ranch house, historic barn, and several windmills and watering troughs serve as reminders of the cattleranching days. In 1977 the California Legislature passed a resolution directing California State Parks to conduct a study on acquiring Chino Hills land for park purposes. A local citizens group, Hills for Everyone, worked closely with California Windmill at Telegraph Canyon State Parks and the legislature to create the park with an initial acquisition of 2,237 acres. The California State Park and Recreation Commission officially declared the area a unit of the State Park System in 1984. Since then, numerous land acquisitions from various private landowners have expanded the park to its present acreage. WILdLIFE Because of its great variety of habitats and microclimates, Chino Hills State Park is an ideal location for observing many wildlife species Bobcat native to Southern California. More than 200 species of birds and mammals, numerous reptiles and amphibians, and thousands of types Coastal cactus wren of insects and other invertebrates live in the park. Some of these animals — including the least Bell’s vireo, the California gnatcatcher, and the coastal cactus wren — are considered rare, threatened, or endangered. The diversity of native plants and animals found in this region is ranked one of the highest in the United States. GEOLOGy Ranging from 400 to 1,781 feet in elevation, the park straddles the north WHAT IS A BIOLOGICAL CORRIdOR? Development has claimed large tracts of wildlife habitat. Biological corridors link the remaining habitats by acting as passageways between designated open spaces. When small patches of wilderness are cut off from other open-space areas, many of the species present at the time of isolation will inevitably disappear. Biological corridors help to maintain healthy populations of plants and animals by allowing for genetic exchange, species migration, and repopulation after a catastrophe such as fire. end of the Santa Ana Mountains and the southeast portion of the Puente-Chino Hills, which together form the northern end of the The P
Nuestra Misión Parque Estatal Chino Hills La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. El Parque Estatal Chino Hills es una isla de tranquilidad en un mar de urbanización. California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (951) 780-6222. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Chino Hills State Park 4721 Sapphire Road Chino Hills, CA 91709 (951) 780-6222 www.parks.ca.gov/ChinoHillsSP © 2002 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) E l Parque Estatal Chino Hills (Chino Hills State Park), un área principal natural abierta en las colinas alrededor del Cañón de Santa Ana cerca de Riverside, es un enlace crucial en el corredor biológico Puente-Chino Hills. Este “enlace biológico” se extiende cerca de 31 millas desde las Montañas de Santa Ana hasta Whittier Hills. El parque tiene más de 14,000 acres de colinas onduladas y cubiertas de hierba, y valles salpicados con robles y sicomoros. El parque también es un lugar donde las personas pueden escapar de las presiones diarias y encontrar paz y soledad en un entorno natural. Los visitantes pueden acampar algunos días o disfrutar al pasear, montar a caballo o pedalear por los senderos que serpentean a lo largo de crestas y a través de valles, bosques, matorrales y prados. Más de 90 millas de senderos ofrecen excelentes oportunidades para observar la vida salvaje y las plantas nativas. El parque posee un centro para visitantes, una zona para acampar, zonas de picnic e instalaciones ecuestres. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Durante siglos, muchas personas han usado los espacios abiertos, el agua abundante, las plantas y los recursos animales de Chino Hills. Antes del contacto europeo, los indígenas Tongva (Gabrielino) que vivían junto a la cuenca del Río de Santa Ana establecieron campamentos temporales aquí para recolectar alimentos. Después de que los españoles fundaron la Misión San Gabriel en 1771, las colinas Chino Hills se usaron ampliamente para que el ganado de la misión pastara. Durante la era de la República Mexicana, las colinas se usaron como pasto secundario de los ranchos mexicanos adyacentes como Santa Ana del Chino y La Sierra Yorba. Después de que México cedió California a los Estados Unidos en 1848, el terreno se siguió usando para el ganado. La adquisición de terreno privado aquí comenzó alrededor del año 1870 y continuó hasta alrededor de la década de los noventa del siglo XIX. Parte de la exploración petrolera y actividad minera a finales del siglo XIX y comienzos del siglo XX también se llevaron a cabo en áreas que ahora pertenecen al parque. En 1948, se estableció el rancho Rolling M Ranch de 1,720 acres, y el terreno se alquiló a propietarios de terrenos adyacentes para que pastara el ganado. Una casa de hacienda, un establo histórico y varios molinos de viento y abrevaderos sirven como recordatorios de los días de la cría de ganado. En 1977 la Legislatura de California (California Legislature) aprobó una resolución que ordenaba a California State Parks a realizar un estudio sobre la adquisición de terreno de Chino Hills para crear un parque. Un grupo civil local, Hills for Everyone, trabajó estrechamente con California State Parks y la Legislatura para crear el parque con una adquisición inicial de 2,237 acres. La Comisión de Parques Estatales y Recreación (State Park and Recreation Commission) declaró oficialmente la zona como una unidad del Sistema de Parques Estatales en 1984. Desde entonces, numerosas adquisiciones de terrenos de diversos propietarios privados han expandido el parque a su superficie actual. Molino en Telegraph Canyon ¿QUÉ ES UN CORREDOR BIOLÓGICO? El desarrollo ha tomado grandes extensiones del hábitat de la vida silvestre. Los corredores biológicos enlazan los hábitats restantes al actuar como pasillos entre espacios abiertos designados. Cuando se cortan trozos pequeños de área silvestre de otras zonas abiertas, muchas de las especies presentes al momento del aislamiento desaparecerán inevitablemente. Los corredores biológicos ayudan a mantener poblaciones saludables de plantas y animales al permitir el intercambio genético, la migración de especies y la repoblación después de una catástrofe como un incendio. El enlace biológico Chino Hills ofrece a las personas un refugio de la vida urbana, a la vez que conecta a las plantas y animales del parque a otras

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