Donner Memorial

State Park - California

Donner Memorial State Park preserves the site of the Donner Camp, where members of the ill-fated Donner Party were trapped by weather during the winter of 1846–1847. Caught without shelter or adequate supplies, members of the group resorted to cannibalism to survive. The Sierra Nevada site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The state park contains the Emigrant Trail Museum and the Pioneer Monument dedicated to the travelers of the Emigrant Trail. Donner Memorial State Park is located outside Truckee, California. It has 2.5 miles (4.0 km) of hiking trails, campgrounds, and 3 miles (4.8 km) of lake frontage on Donner Lake.

maps

Recreation Map of the Donner Summit area in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Tahoe - Donner Summit Recreation

Recreation Map of the Donner Summit area in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the southern part of Truckee Ranger District in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Tahoe MVUM - Truckee South 2020

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the southern part of Truckee Ranger District in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Carson and Bridgeport area in Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (NF) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Humboldt-Toiyabe MVUM - Carson and Bridgeport Guide 2014

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Carson and Bridgeport area in Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (NF) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Donner Memorial State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Donner Memorial - Brochure

Brochure of Donner Memorial State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Donner Memorial State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Donner Memorial - Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Donner Memorial State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Campground Map of Donner Memorial State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Donner Memorial - Campground Map

Campground Map of Donner Memorial State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure of Black Bears in California State Parks. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.California State Parks - Black Bears

Brochure of Black Bears in California State Parks. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=503 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donner_Memorial_State_Park Donner Memorial State Park preserves the site of the Donner Camp, where members of the ill-fated Donner Party were trapped by weather during the winter of 1846–1847. Caught without shelter or adequate supplies, members of the group resorted to cannibalism to survive. The Sierra Nevada site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The state park contains the Emigrant Trail Museum and the Pioneer Monument dedicated to the travelers of the Emigrant Trail. Donner Memorial State Park is located outside Truckee, California. It has 2.5 miles (4.0 km) of hiking trails, campgrounds, and 3 miles (4.8 km) of lake frontage on Donner Lake.
Donner Memorial State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. In Donner Memorial State Park’s lush setting, visitors may camp, picnic, hike, bike, snowshoe, or play in the waters of scenic Donner Lake — surrounded by majestic California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 582-7892. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Donner Memorial State Park 12593 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 (530) 582-7892 © 2014 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) lodgepole pines, Jeffrey pines, and white firs. D onner Memorial State Park, located east of Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada, is surrounded by magnificent alpine scenery at an elevation of 6,000 feet. The crisp, pinescented air entices visitors to camp, picnic, hike, fish, boat, water-ski, and paddleboard. PARK HISTORY The Washoe People This area has been the heart of the ancestral Washoe homeland for more than 9,000 years. Semi-nomadic, the Washoe spent summers hunting game and gathering fish and pine nuts. After the 1848 gold discovery, thousands of newcomers passed through the area. Many of them settled here, taking over Washoe lands. The Washoe adapted to new living restrictions, working for ranchers and in settlers’ homes and selling fish and game catches to restaurants. The government promised land, but the Washoe were often given logged-over areas with no water. Still, they built communities. Today’s Washoe have revived their languages, advocating conservation and reintroducing once-depleted resources. a memorial park is born early settlement In 1924, the Pacific Fruit Express, successor to After 1844, emigrants began to enter the Donner Ice Company, gave 10 acres at the California in large numbers. Their last major east end of Donner Lake to the Native Sons of challenge took them over the Sierra Nevada the Golden West, who had a concession near and down into the Central Valley. the one-acre Pioneer Monument. Prior to 1844, only two wagon trains had On May 23, 1928, the Native Sons conveyed ever tried to cross the Sierra Nevada. In the 11 acres to the State, making the Pioneer 1844, the Stephens-Townsend-Murphy party Memorial publicly accessible. Later, another succeeded. The group left six wagons at    the 5.1 acres were added, and 16.1 acres were lake the Washoe called Datsa’ shut   , which transferred from California’s Department the party renamed Truckee Lake, and took of Finance to the new Division of Beaches another five wagons up steep terrain, crossing and Parks. the pass on November 25, 1844. Between 1845 and 1848, about 2,600 emigrants came west — most traveling north of GEOLOGY the Verdi Range, rejoining the The eastern face of the Sierra was formed over Truckee river above its rugged the last few million years by the tilting upward of a massive section of the Earth’s crust. This huge granite canyon, and crossing through block tipped up on the east and down on the west, Coldstream Canyon, south of subducting (disappearing) beneath the sediments that Donner Pass. form the Sacramento Valley. This route was replaced by the Dutch Flat / Donner Lake Glaciers dominated the crest of the Sierra Nevada Toll Road in 1864. However, through much of the past million years, carving out the the completion of the Central Truckee Basin, where the park is located. The retreating Pacific Railroad would ease the glacier left soil and gravel that blocked the creek way for travelers and end the channel and formed Donner Lake. need for a toll road. T H E D O N N E R PA RT Y In the 1830s, travelers who had gone west to California were talking about its wonders and opportunities. The notion of “manifest destiny” had taken hold, and many believed that America was destined to stretch “from sea to shining sea.” By 1845 they were also drawn west by news that it was possible to travel directly overland to California. In Illinois, farmers George and Jacob Donner and cabinetmaker James Reed packed up nine ox-drawn wagons; in April 1846, they headed west with their families. That summer, George’s wife Tamsen wrote to a friend, describing beautiful weather and a pleasant journey. When the wagon train reached a fork in the trail, the emigrants split into two groups. The Donner, Breen, Murphy, Eddy, Graves, and Keseberg families chose an alternate route instead of the traditional one. Recommended in The Emigrants’ Guide to Oregon and California, a book written in 1845 by Ohio a
Parque Estatal Donner Memorial Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. En el exuberante entorno del Parque Estatal Donner Memorial, los visitantes pueden acampar, hacer picnics y senderismo, montar bicicleta, hacer caminatas California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (530) 582-7892. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Donner Memorial State Park 12593 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 (530) 582-7892 © 2014 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) con raquetas de nieve o jugar en las aguas del pintoresco Lago Donner, rodeado por majestuosos pinos Lodgepole y Jeffrey, y abetos blancos. E l Parque Estatal Donner Memorial, ubicado al este del Paso Donner en la Sierra Nevada, está rodeado por un magnífico escenario alpino con una elevación de 6,000 pies. El aire fresco con olor a pinos invita a los visitantes a acampar, hacer picnics, salir de excursión, pescar, pasear en bote, practicar esquí acuático y hacer paddleboard. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Los pueblos Washoe Esta área ha sido el corazón del hogar ancestral de los Washoe por más de 9,000 años. Los Washoe eran seminómadas y pasaban veranos cazando, pescando y recolectando piñones. Después del descubrimiento del oro en 1848, miles de recién llegados pasaron a través del área. Muchos se establecieron aquí, tomando las tierras de los Washoe. Los Washoe se adaptaron a las nuevas restricciones de vida, trabajando para hacendados y en los hogares de los colonos y vendiendo pescado y presas a los restaurantes. El gobierno prometió tierras, pero a menudo los Washoe recibían áreas deforestadas sin agua. Aun así, construyeron comunidades. Los Washoe actuales han recuperado sus idiomas, abogan por la conservación y reintroducen recursos alguna vez agotados. la culminación del ferrocarril Central Pacific facilitaría el camino para los viajeros y terminaría con la necesidad de una carretera con peaje. PRIMEROS ASENTAMIENTOS NACE UN PARQUE CONMEMORATIVO Después de 1844, los emigrantes comenzaron a ingresar a California en grandes grupos. Su En 1924, el Pacific Fruit Express, sucesor de último desafío importante los llevó sobre la la Donner Ice Company, cedió 10 acres en Sierra Nevada y abajo hacia Central Valley. el extremo este del Lago Donner a los Hijos Antes de 1844, solo dos caravanas de carretas Nativos del Dorado Oeste (Native Sons habían intentado cruzar la Sierra Nevada. of the Golden West), quienes tenían una En 1844, la expedición Stephens-Townsendconcesión cerca del Monumento de los Murphy tuvo éxito. El grupo dejó seis carretas Pioneros de un acre. en el lago que los Washoe llamaban Datsa’ El 23 de mayo de 1928, los Hijos Nativos shut, el cual fue renombrado por la expedición traspasaron los 11 acres al Estado, lo cual como Lago Truckee, y llevó otras cinco carretas hizo que el Monumento de los Pioneros por un terreno inclinado para cruzar el paso el fuera accesible al público. Más adelante se 25 de noviembre de 1844. agregaron otros 5.1 acres y 16.1 acres fueron Entre 1845 y 1848, cerca de 2,600 emigrantes transferidos del Departamento de Finanzas vinieron al oeste; la mayoría viajando por el de California (California’s Department of norte de la cadena montañosa Verdi Range, Finance) a la nueva División de Playas y incorporándose al río Truckee por encima Parques (Division of Beaches and Parks). de su cañón escarpado y cruzando Coldstream Canyon, al sur del Paso GEOLOGÍA Donner. El lado este de la Sierra se formó durante los últimos millones Esta ruta fue reemplazada por de años a causa de la inclinación de una sección masiva la carretera con peaje Dutch Flat / de la corteza de la Tierra. Este inmenso bloque de granito Donner Lake en 1864. Sin embargo, se levantó en el este y se inclinó hacia abajo en el oeste, subducciéndose (desapareciendo) debajo de los sedimentos que forman el Valle de Sacramento. Los glaciares dominaron la cresta de la Sierra Nevada muchos de los últimos millones de años forjando la Cuenca de Truckee donde se ubica el parque. La retirada del glaciar dejó tierra y grava que bloquearon el canal del arroyo y formaron el Lago Donner. LA EXPEDICIÓN DONNER En la década de 1830, los viajeros que habían ido al oeste a California hablaban sobre sus maravillas y oportunidades. La noción de “destino manifiesto” se había arraigado y muchos cre
East Beach Donner Pass Road DONNER LAKE Truckee Camper Registration Dam Boat Rental Emigrant Trail Museum To China Cove Swimming Beach 123 125 124 126 128 127 130 129 131 120 121 146 148 147 149 113 114 Splitrock 108-152 112 2 3 5 7 8 10 12 11 116 136 134 137 138 139 China Cove 140 141 142 144 143 N 9 119 118 117 135 145 4 6 122 115 132 133 Ridge 1-49 13 14 15 16 17 32 49 48 47 46 31 45 44 43 41 42 30 29 39 40 28 38 27 36 37 26 25 HOST 35 33 24 111 110 18 19 109 108 151 152 150 © 2013 California State Parks Creek 50-107 20 91 90 71 92 94 93 96 95 52 54 53 57 22 23 21 50 97 55 56 58 59 102 103 89 70 68 69 88 HOST 75 104 62 60 To Coldstream Valley 80 82 81 79 78 77 74 73 67 51 99 86 85 84 83 87 72 63 66 65 61 64 105 106 Amphitheatre Donner Memorial State Park Campground Map (Not to scale) Nature Trail 1 Michelís Pond 107
American Name ofinPark B lack Bears State State Park Parks California Thanks to the following agencies for their assistance: El Dorado County U.S. Forest Service, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit California Department of Fish and Game U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tahoe Council for Wild Bears Yosemite National Park Sequoia National Park California State Parks, Sierra District: Mono Lake Tufa SNR Bodie SHP Grover Hot Springs SP Lake Valley SRA Washoe Meadows SP Emerald Bay SP DL Bliss SP Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point SP Ward Creek Unit Tahoe SRA Burton Creek SP Kings Beach SRA Donner Memorial SP Plumas Eureka SP Malakoff Diggins SHP Empire Mine SHP South Yuba River SP Photo: Janice Clark State Parks and Campgrounds in the Sierra District are situated in areas that are also black bear habitat. For more information contact: Park Office, Campground Entry Station or California State Parks Sierra District Headquarters P. O. Box 266 7360 West Lake Blvd. (Highway 89) Tahoma, CA 96142 (530) 525-7232 © 2008 California State Parks (Rev. 2010) Black bears (Ursus americanus) are an important component of California’s ecosystems and a valuable natural legacy for the people of California. The black bear is the only species of bear remaining in California and Nevada. The common name “black bear” is misleading; California black bears may be black, brown, cinnamon, even blonde. Some bears have a white patch on the chest. Bear Encounters - Never approach a bear! In the campground: Do not run. Be aggressive; assert your dominance by standing tall and making noise to scare the bear away. Loudly banging pots and pans together and shouting may work. In the woods: This is the bear’s territory; respect that and do not run. Make eye contact, but don’t stare. Pick up small children. Make yourself appear as large as possible. Stay calm and quiet—back away slowly. Black bears will usually avoid confrontation with humans. Bears will often climb a tree if frightened and usually won’t come down as long as humans or dogs are present. Strict regulations are in place to r­educe conflicts between humans and bears. There is zero tolerance for non-compliance. • Bear-resistant food storage lockers are available at all Sierra District Campgrounds. • All food and refuse must be stored in the bear-resistant lockers provided at all times—unless it is actively being used or transported. • Food-storage lockers must always be closed when not in use— whether or not food or refuse is present. • Food that cannot be stored in the provided bear-resistant lockers must be discarded. Get out of the way! If the bear attempts to get away, do not block the bear’s escape route. Report all bear encounters in state park campgrounds and picnic areas to staff at the park office or entrance station, to campground hosts or to rangers on patrol. • No food, refuse or scented items may be stored in a vehicle in the campground at any time. • Non-compliance may result in eviction from the park or other law enforcement action. Black Bears Facts Adults typically weigh 100 to Diet Bears are omnivorous; their Behavior Black bears can be active 400 pounds and measure between 4 and 6 feet from tip of nose to tail. Males are larger than females. Some adult males may weigh over 500 pounds. Wild bears may live about 25 years. teeth are designed for crushing rather than cutting food, like meat-eating carnivore teeth. Bears’ diets are based on seasonal availability of food. Black bears’ diets consist of seven food categories: grasses, berries, nuts, insects, small mammals, wood fiber, and carrion (decaying flesh). any time during the day or night. As winter approaches, bears will forage for food up to 20 hours a day to store enough fat to sustain them through hibernation. Females give birth to one to three cubs in January, during hibernation. Typically, bears have young every other year. Black bears have curved claws that allow them to climb trees. They often climb to retreat from threats, including humans. A healthy bear may run up to 30 miles per hour for short distances. Black bears are excellent swimmers; they can cross up to 1½ miles of open fresh water for food. Photo: Tammy Evans Food shortages occur in summer and fall when wild food becomes scarce. Bears get bolder and may encounter humans in their search for food. The trunk of your car and your cooler are not bear-proof! Bears may learn to associate wrappers and containers with food and can identify them by sight. They also learn to open vehicle doors. Photo: Janice Clark Black bears may scavenge in garbage cans and dumpsters; they will break into and demolish the interiors of houses, garages, cars and campers. Bears will also raid campsites and food caches, sometimes injuring people. Often these incidents result from careless human behavior. Black bears will usually try to avoid confrontation with humans. If encountered, always leave a bear a clear escape route—especially a bear with cubs. Photo: Scott

also available

National Parks
USFS NW