Ardenwood Historic Farm

Regional Historic Site - California

Ardenwood Historic Farm is a Regional Historic Landmark in Fremont, California. The Ardenwood Historic Farm consists of the Ardenwood Station, the former Ohlone village and burial site, a blacksmith shop, an area with farm animals, Patterson House, and a gazebo. The Ardenwood Farm today is a working farm, producing grain and vegetables.

maps

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.East Bay Regional Parks - Overview Map

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Fremont

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

brochures

Brochure of Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Brochure

Brochure of Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Brochure of Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Brochure (Español)

Brochure of Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Wayside Map Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Wayside Map

Wayside Map Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Ohlone Indian Village Site Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Ohlone Indian Village Site

Ohlone Indian Village Site Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Deer Park Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Deer Park

Deer Park Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

The William Patterson House Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - The William Patterson House

The William Patterson House Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Leal Tank House Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Leal Tank House

Leal Tank House Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Wandering Butterflies Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Wandering Butterflies

Wandering Butterflies Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Japanese Teahouse Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Japanese Teahouse

Japanese Teahouse Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Why Are There Trains On The Farm Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - Why Are There Trains On The Farm

Why Are There Trains On The Farm Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

The Patterson House Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Interpretive Panels - The Patterson House

The Patterson House Interpretive Panel at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Tour Guide to Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Tour

Tour Guide to Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Birds at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Birds

Birds at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Farm Animals at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Farm Animals

Farm Animals at Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

A photographic guide to showy wildflowers of Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Wildflowers

A photographic guide to showy wildflowers of Ardenwood Historic Farm, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Wild Plants of Ardenwood Historic Farm and Lake Chabot Regional Park, parts of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Ardenwood - Wild Plants

Wild Plants of Ardenwood Historic Farm and Lake Chabot Regional Park, parts of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Ardenwood Historic Farm RHS https://www.ebparks.org/parks/ardenwood/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardenwood_Historic_Farm Ardenwood Historic Farm is a Regional Historic Landmark in Fremont, California. The Ardenwood Historic Farm consists of the Ardenwood Station, the former Ohlone village and burial site, a blacksmith shop, an area with farm animals, Patterson House, and a gazebo. The Ardenwood Farm today is a working farm, producing grain and vegetables.
Open year-round, Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (no admittance after 4 p.m.), also Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day. Train rides are available from April to midNovember on Thursday, Friday, Sunday, and during December events. ...is your key to the past A farmer’s legacy... Cattle still graze in the pastures. The land still grows the kind of crops George Patterson tended 150 years ago, and the farmyard is still full of animals. It was 1849 when George Patterson joined the stream of young men leaving the Midwest for California’s gold fields. His dreams left little room for failure, but after a year and a half of mining he was ill and broke, so he turned to work he knew well: farming. Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Storms may close farm without notice. Fees and Event Information — See insert or www.ebparks.org/parks/ardenwood. Ardenwood Historic Farm is operated in partnership between the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) and the City of Fremont. EBRPD membership privileges include free admission (special events excluded). Dogs are not permitted. Service animals are excepted. Modern Recreational Equipment — i.e. Frisbees, footballs, soccer balls, bicycles, as well as balloons, and BBQs are prohibited. Photo: Akio Higuchi House Tours are available from April to midNovember and during December events. Tours are conducted Thursday-Sunday and are limited. Tickets are available at the Arden Station on a first-come, first-served basis. You must be a minimum of 6 years of age to go on a tour. Tots tours are available. Groups of 20+ should make a reservation. Call 510-791-4196 for house tour information. George gradually bought land with the money he earned by working for farmers near Mission San Jose. By the time he married Clara Hawley in 1877, he was on his way to acquiring nearly 6,000 acres of land and was one of the wealthiest and most wellrespected men in the area. At last he had struck “gold” — not in the hills, but through farming the fertile plains of the East Bay. Today, Patterson’s original house and land are part of Ardenwood Historic Farm. We invite you to come and experience farm life as it was near the turn of the 20th Century. Reservations — Teachers or groups desiring a naturalist program or tour call 510-544-2797. To reserve E-I-O picnic site call 1-888-EBPARKS (1-888-327-2757, option 2). For wedding and events call 510-754-9877 or visit www.ardenwoodevents.com. George Patterson Clara Hawley Patterson Children Henry and William Docents and Volunteers — Ardenwood depends upon volunteers for its continued operation. Your interest in restoration, farming, gardening, house tours, historic crafts, or farmyard demonstrations will help keep the farm growing and flourishing. For more information call 510-544-2797. CHLORIN E Po st 100% 4/17 r 10 0% A tremendous Ardenwood was community and Park named after a forest District effort has area described in brought the farm to this Shakespeare’s play point, but it is far from “As You Like It.” complete. We are busy restoring antique pieces of farm equipment and adding some things that weren’t here 150 years ago. So don’t make this your only visit! Come back soon to see how things are coming along. me su Ardenwood Brochure English_4-2017.indd 1 The East Bay Regional Park District and the City of Fremont invite you to come often to Ardenwood; to picnic, play, and see for yourself what life was like at the turn of the 20th Century. It’s a way of life nearly forgotten in the East Bay. n Co 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, CA 94605 1-888-EBPARKS • www.ebparks.org Costumed docents EE FR PROCES S ED Staff and volunteers attired in Victorian clothing are on hand to show you through the Patterson family home, demonstrate farm chores, explain the social graces of the Victorian era, and guide you around the 205-acre farm. Annual harvesting Old-fashioned games Patterson House tours 4/5/17 1:01 PM  eer Park Station 3 D For a ride to Arden Station (#1 on map), board the farm’s railway here. 15 B  lacksmith Shop and Equipment Shed (circa 1850) Found here are the forge and various tools needed for making and fixing equipment on the farm. 13 C  ountry Kitchen Check schedule for cooking demonstrations on our wood-burning stove. (April to mid-November) 16 F  arm Animals Here you’ll find farm animals including rabbits, sheep, goats, and cows. 14 H  aybarn (circa 1910) Equipment and tack are stored in the barn. Corn Room programs meet here. 17 Tractor Shed The farm’s antique tractor collection is here. Ardenwood Brochure English_4-2017.indd 2 3 Deer Park Station 20 19 Central Field 17 24 A  rdenwood Historic Farm Park Operations Office 8 7 14 13 4 15 12 18 5 9 11 10 6 16 24 To Oakland N Visitor Center and Arden Station 1 Railway to Deer Park Station (See #3) Entrance B lv d. 23 22 2 Fre nt mo To San Jose 880 84 Ardenwood Historic Farm E nt r a n ce Ardenwood
ARDENWOOD ABIERTO todo el año, martes a domingo, 10:00 a.m. a 5:00 p.m.,* inc. Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day. Hay viajes en tren y demostraciones de herreros de abril a mediados de noviembre los jueves, viernes y domingos y durante los eventos de diciembre. * No se permite entrada después de las 4:00 p.m. CERRADO lunes, Thanksgiving y Navidad. En tiempos de lluvias, la granja puede ser serrada sin notificación. CUOTAS­—Ver folleto anexo para cuotas e información de eventos. La Granja Histórica de Ardenwood la lleva el Distrito de Parques Regionales del Este de la Bahía [EBRPD por sus siglas en inglés] con la Ciudad de Fremont. Los privilegios de asociación del EBRPD incluyen la entrada gratis (no eventos especiales). Prohibidos los PERROS en el parque. Prohibidos el EQUIPO DE RECREACIÓN MODERNO (frisbees, balones de futbol y de futbol americano, bicicletas), globos y asadores de carnes. El legado de un granjero... En 1849 George Patterson se unió a los jóvenes que partían del Medio Oeste hacia los campos de oro de California. No cabía el fracaso en sus sueños, pero después de año y medio en la minería de oro cayó enfermo y en la ruina, así que recurrió a lo que ya conocía: la agricultura. Poco a poco George compró tierras con el dinero que ganaba trabajando para los granjeros cerca de la Misión San José. Cuando se casó con Clara Hawley en 1877, adquiría casi 6,000 acres de tierras y era uno de los hombres más ricos y respetados de la zona. Al final había encontrado el “oro” -- no en las colinas, sino en la agricultura de las llanuras fértiles del Este de la Bahía. Hoy, la tierra y casa original de Patterson son parte de Ardenwood Historic Farm. Le invitamos a venir a vivir la vida de una granja como era al principio del siglo XX. RESERVACIONES—Los maestros que busquen un paquete de reservación de visita de escuela o grupos grandes que deseen programas especiales, visitas o viajes deben llamar al 510-544-2797. Para reservaciones para el sitio de picnic E-I-O, llame al 1-888-EBPARKS (1-888-327-2757, opción 2). Para bodas y picnics de grupo grandes (más de 50), llame a Quantum Music Event Planners al 925-5868316. Po st 10/13 La Familia Patterson ...es la clave al pasado. El ganado aún pasta en el campo, aún se cultivan las cosechas que George Patterson cuidaba hace 100 años y el corral aún está lleno de animales. Un esfuerzo tremendo de la comunidad y del Distrito de Parques ha llevado a la granja hasta aquí, pero falta mucho por terminar. Estamos restaurando piezas antiguas de equipo de granja y agregando algunas cosas que no estaban aquí hace 100 años. ¡Que no sea esta su única visita! Vuelva pronto para ver cómo están avanzando las cosas. Cosecha de heno Granja histórica r www.ebparks.org 10 0% EE FR PROCES S E El nombre de Ardenwood se debe a un bosque de la obra de Shakespeare “As you like it”. e um ns Co CHLORIN Clara El EBRPD y la Ciudad de Fremont le invitan a venir a menudo a Ardenwood; a hacer picnics, jugar y ver por sí mismo cómo era la vida a principios del siglo XX en el Este de la Bahía. GUÍAS DE VISITAS Y VOLUNTARIOS—Ardenwood depende de los voluntarios para su continua operación. Su interés en la restauración, agricultura, jardinería, visitas de la casa, artesanías históricas o demostraciones del corral harán que la granja siga creciendo y prosperando. Más información en al 510-544-2797. ED Henry y William La plantilla y los voluntarios, vestidos con ropas de la era victoriana, están disponibles para enseñarle la casa de la familia Patterson, demostrarle las tareas de granja, explicarle los buenos modales sociales de la era victoriana y guiarle por la granja de 205 acres. Hay VISITAS DE LA CASA de abril a mediados de noviembre y durante los eventos de diciembre. Las visitas son de jueves a domingo y son reducidas. EAST BAY REGIONAL PARK DISTRICT 2950 Peralta Oaks Ct., P.O. Box 5381 Oakland, CA 94605-0381 1-888-EBPARKS (1-888-327-2757) TRS Relay: 711 100% George East Bay Regional Park District www.ebparks.org Animales de granja Juegos tradicionales de la granja 1. CENTRO DE VISITAS Y ARDEN STATION En la estación del tren, consiga la última información sobre el programa, disfrute de exposiciones de la historia de Ardenwood o suba al tren de la granja hacia Deer Park Station (#3). 2. LA ALBERCA (reservable) Fue la primera alberca hecha de cemento en el condado. Ahora tapada, se usa para actividades especiales y bodas. 3. DEER PARK STATION Para viajar a Arden Station (#1) suba al ferrocarril de la granja aquí. ARDENWOOD HISTORIC FARM 14. GRANERO DE PAJA (hacia 1910) Equipo y arreos se guardan en el granero. Los Programas de la Sala de Maíz se reúnen aquí. Eastwood Northwood 3 Deer Park 20 21 19 4 17 7 8. GALLINERO Y ANIMALES DE GRANJA Verá pollos, pavos, cabras y puercos. 9. CANCHA DE TENIS (hacia 1900) Un verdadero lujo en aquel entonces. Por el momento se ha cubierto de asfalto. 10. QUIOSCO (recreado) Elemento común en muchas fincas de la er
ARDENWOOD HISTORIC FARM You are here 15 Blacksmith Shop and Equipment Shed 1 Visitor Center and Arden Station 16 Farm Animals 2 Pool Site 17 Tractor Shed 3 Deer Park Station 18 Milk House 4 Kitchen Garden 19 Deer Park Picnic Area 5 Patterson House 20 Cook’s House 6 Greenhouse 21 Walnut Orchard 7 E-I-O Picnic Area 22 Pasture 8 Chicken Coop and Farm Animals 23 Tankhouse 9 Tennis Court 24 Park Operations Office 10 Gazebo 25 Outhouse 11 Farmyard Picnic Area 26 Farmyard Cafe 12 Granary Restrooms 13 Country Kitchen Park Entrance 14 Haybarn 3 19 21 6 18 2 5 7 20 25 17 4 8 9 10 1 12 11 22 14 26 23 13 15 16 24
OHLONE INDIAN VILLAGE SITE This was Tuibun Ohlone Indian land long before Spanish immigration and Patterson Family ownership. Archeological evidence indicates that a small Ohlone village once flourished here for centuries in the meadow beyond this sign. These people hunted, fished, and gathered berries, grains, nuts, and shellfish from the surrounding environment. Houses and boats were made of tule. Deer, elk, antelope, sea otters, and birds were abundant in the area. By taking only what they needed, the Ohlone lived in balance with nature. For many generations Ohlone people laughed, sang, and worked here. Many Ohlone descendants live in the Bay Area today. They maintain the vibrant culture passed down through generations. Imagine all that may have happened just beyond this sign? Illustration by Barbara Downs Courtesy of The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley, CA Contemporary dancers at the Gathering of Ohlone People held at Coyote Hills Regional Park. Photo by Bev Ortiz
DEER PARK Victorian Americans had a romantic emotional attachment to nature. It was a sanctuary from the changes industry and science were bringing to society. Victorian art, literature and architecture all incorporated “the freshness of the early world.” George and Clara Patterson even added nature into the carvings on the front of their house. Victorians sought a connection with nature, but nature scaled down to human proportions and domesticated. But keeping wild deer caused problems. Farmhands were pinned against the fence or bucked by the deer. One worker was run up a tree by a buck and was so frightened that he stayed there all night. Finally, in 1908, the deer were released back into the wild. Clara loved the outdoors and around 1896 established her own Deer Park at the farm. It had a tall fence surrounding 20 acres and a herd of 16-20 deer. The family and neighbors would often picnic here enjoying the beauty of deer in a “natural” state. “Its dense undergrowth and generally wild appearance make it an ideal home for the handsome animals. They are captives with none of the elements of captivity.” Washington Press, September 1898. All photos courtesy of the Patterson House Collection The deer were fed every day between 4:00pm and 6:00pm. “The deer are Mrs. Patterson’s special pets and she passes many pleasant hours watching them.” Washington Press, September 1898
THE WILLIAM PATTERSON HOUSE On this site in May of 1904, William Donald Patterson began construction of his 13-room Edwardian home. Born on the 4th day of December 1880, he was the second son of George and Clara Patterson. His elder brother Henry inherited the Patterson mansion after their father’s death in 1895. His mother, Clara then gave William $12,000 to construct his own home in the Ardenwood Estate. William and his wife, May Bird, lived in this home until 1961, during which time they had three sons. On November 28, 1961, William died. His will stipulated that if none of his sons wanted to live in the house, it was to be destroyed. After some months of deliberation, his sons, now living elsewhere with their families, decided to honor the will. The William Patterson home was burned down by the local fire department in February of 1962. Photo courtesy of Paul West Photo courtesy of Bruce Patterson
LEAL TANK HOUSE Joseph Silviera Leal and Julia Perry Leal built this tank house on their ranch in the Mission San Jose area of Fremont in 1925. The lower floor was a storage room and the upper floor a bedroom. The tank on top stored 5,000 gallons of water pumped from a 100 foot-deep well. It was the only source of water for the Leal home and livestock for 57 years. The tank house was reconstructed at Ardenwood in 2004 by community volunteers from local Rotary Clubs and spearheaded by members of Mission San Jose Rotary. It is dedicated to the memory of Charles “Skip” Domville who initiated this project as part of his efforts to preserve local history. A tank house similar to this one, once supplied all the water for the Patterson House, gardens and other nearby buildings. Bernie Leal (grandson of Julia and Joseph) donated the tank house to the city of Fremont. Tank house Julia Perry Leal and Joseph Silviera Leal wedding photo, 1899. The tank house on Leal Ranch. All photos courtesy of Bernie Leal
WANDERING BUTTERFLIES Each fall, monarch butterflies from the western U.S. and Canada migrate hundreds of miles to the California coast. They are seeking protection from freezing temperatures and winter storms in sheltered groves such as this stand of eucalyptus. the start of mating. Fertilized females will then disperse in search of milkweed, where they will lay their eggs. Four or more future generations of monarchs may hatch before the return trip to Ardenwood Historic Farm is made next fall. The butterflies you see today will never return. Where they end their life cycle or how far they These overwintering monarchs will stay in this protected area until longer days signal Monarch Migration Fall migration: Spring dispersal: One generation migrates to overwintering sites. Multiple generations spread out across Western North America. Point Pinole Regional Shoreline Ardenwood Historic Farm Natural Bridges State Beach Pacific Grove Sanctuary Pismo State Beach Ellwood Mesa Open Space Photo: Dave Miller travel are questions still being researched by scientists today. How far do you think they go?
JAPANESE TEAHOUSE This site, referred to by family and friends as the “Teahouse” Field, actually contains the ruins of the Japanese Commissioner’s Office building which was part of the Pan Pacific International Exposition held in San Francisco in 1915. After the close of the Expo, Clara Patterson Layson had the building disassembled and relocated to this site. She then contracted Julia Morgan to remodel the building into a residence. When Clara died on May 29, 1917 work stopped and the residence was never completed. On December 8, 1941, fire burned the building. Clara Patterson Layson Photo courtesy of the Patterson House Collection Photo courtesy of Society of California Pioneers
WHY ARE THERE TRAINS ON THE FARM? Railroads linked farms and families together over a century ago. The South Pacific Coast Railroad connected Ardenwood to the world. The railroads were not always welcome. In 1877, George Patterson tried to keep the mighty railroad from crossing his land. He built sturdy fences to keep the railroad from cutting through his fields. Before leaving on his honeymoon, George posted armed guards to enforce his will. When he returned, George discovered that his guards, full of whiskey supplied by the railroad, couldn't stop the rail crews from tearing down the fences and laying track across his land. The work was finished all in one night. Top: The railroad at Ardenwood recreates a nearby branch line of the South Pacific Coast Railroad. Using only horse-drawn rail cars, the Centerville Branch carried both freight and passengers between the farming communities of Newark and Centerville (now a district of Fremont) between 1882 and 1909. Trains still run along that line today. It’s the track you see along Ardenwood Boulevard. Left: Two years after George Patterson’s death in 1895, his wife, Clara, ordered the construction of the small “Arden” depot to connect the farm to the world. The Railroad Museum at Ardenwood is operated by the nonprofit Society for the Preservation of Carter Railroad Resources. Volunteers restore narrow gauge wooden railroad cars dating from 1878 to the early 1900s-many built in Newark, California. Today the train takes passengers on a half mile ride through farm fields and a grove of eucalyptus trees. If you are interested in volunteering please talk with the train crew or visit www.spcrr.org and Facebook.com/SPCRRMuseum. Top photo: Bruce MacGregor, bottom photo: Barry Lependorf. Photos courtesy of the Railroad Museum at Ardenwood Society for Preservation of Carter Railroad Resources
THE PATTERSON HOUSE Originally a simple two bedroom, two story farmhouse built on 1857, this house has grown and changed over time. It was to this home that 49er-turned-farmer George Patterson brought his bride, Clara in 1877. In 1889, George and Clara had the house remodeled into a grand Victorian home. This addition, by San Francisco architect Samuel Newsom, added an entry, family and guest parlors, and three bedrooms. In 1903, Clara would give the home to her oldest son Henry. In 1915, Henry and his wife Sara enclosed a side porch and balcony and replaced the original kitchen with a modern one. Oil Painting by Roger Fällman, Patterson House Collection 1857 1889 1915 The 1889 addition to the original farmhouse is a spectacular example of the Queen Anne style of architecture popular in the late 19th century.
W N E D R A ISTORIC FAORMOD H Tour East Bay Regional Park District Trail’s End 13 12 7 6 5 8 3 4 Park Entrance Ardenwood Station 1. OHLONE INDIANS 2. VICTORIAN GARDEN 3. PATTERSON HOUSE 4. GRANITE PILE 5. MILK HOUSE 6. COOK’S HOUSE 7. OUTHOUSE 11 10 9 2 1 Begin Here 8. KITCHEN GARDEN 9. TENNIS COURT 10. FARMYARD 11. CROP FIELDS 12. FARM ANIMALS 13. WALNUT ORCHARD TRAIL’S END INTRODUCTION The wares of the late 19th century are more than mere curiosities or unique home decorations—they are evidence of the customs and attitudes of life in another era. Everyday objects from the turn-of-the-last century may appear quaint to us, but to the people of the time, they were an integral part of farm and family life. On this ½ mile walk, you will have a chance to see how the buildings and artifacts here at Ardenwood relate to the customs and attitudes of those who lived 100 years ago. The route will lead you through the peacefulness of the Victorian garden, past the hustle and bustle of the farmyard, to the orchards and farm fields where every season brings something new. Your walk begins just past the Train Station at the Ohlone Indian wayside panel. In 1849 George W. Patterson, lured by the promise of gold, left his home in Indiana and set out for California. By 1889 he had made his fortune, not in gold fields, but through farming the fertile land of the East Bay. Three generations later, much remains at Ardenwood that speaks clearly about the life and times of Victorian Americans. On this walk you will have the chance to investigate the tangible remains of life on this farm a century ago. 1. OHLONE INDIANS Neither the Pattersons nor previous farmers were the first to inhabit the East Bay. Indeed, the first inhabitants, the Ohlone Indians, were not farmers at all, but hunter-gatherers. Hunting wild game and gathering edible and other useful plants, the Ohlones maintained a lifestyle of peaceful dependence upon the land for 2,000 years. To your left, a small mound of earth is all that remains to remind us of those first inhabitants of what was to become the Ardenwood estate. On this site they built houses of tules and cattails, ground acorns, played games, and raised families. Turn left toward Deer Park, then right at the first intersection. Your next stop is the garden area near the fountain. 2. VICTORIAN GARDEN The Ohlone people had lived for centuries with a deep and abiding respect for the land. Nineteenth century Americans, on the other hand, had to be reminded of their dependence upon nature by moralists, educators, and through work in their gardens. Victorian gardens were visual reminders of the social status of the family and a place of beauty and relaxation. They were also important because of what they symbolized. Moral lessons were drawn from the processes of growth, renewal, and decay. Gardening was thought to be a safeguard against a life of political agitation and a protection from the enticements of evil. Make your way to the front of the Patterson House. 3. PATTERSON HOUSE Before you stands the Patterson house, once the home of George and Clara Patterson. Within this house, Clara attempted to create an atmosphere opposite that of her husband’s world of agriculture and commerce. Her responsibility was to transform the interior of the house into a place of culture, education, and restfulness, as well as one which would display her family’s status. Clara, like most Victorian women, was measured by the state of her home. It was generally agreed that a family’s morality and prosperity were in part determined by how carefully the wife maintained the home. Facing the front porch, walk around to the left side of the house. 4. GRANITE PILE This pile of unused foundation granite became the site for many of the Patterson’s family portraits. Just as the home was a measure of status, a family portrait displayed that status as well. Fashionable clothing was a must for such portraits, which for ladies included a corset, bustle, and several petticoats. These articles of clothing, a sign of affluence in a society that valued display, made movement difficult. Confining clothing demonstrated that there was no need for a woman to participate in the arduous labor of housework because her husband was wealthy enough to hire domestic help. Walk past the granite pile on the path and notice the stone milk house on your left. 5. MILK HOUSE The milk house was a cool place to store dairy products in an era before refrigeration. The thick stone walls helped to maintain a cool, even temperature year round, while breezes blowing through wet burlap over the windows provided additional cooling in the summer. On smaller, less prosperous farms, the contents of the milk house were often the housewife’s responsibility. With a schedule that made an outside job impossible, marketing dairy products provided the housewife with spending money. She might save for a sewing machine, an invention that reduced the time req
Jan Feb M ar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb M ar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Swallows Violet-green swallow (b) Northern rough-winged Swallow Cliff swallow Barn swallow (b) Chickadees &Titmice Chestnut-backed chickadee (b) Oak titmouse Bushtit (b) Nuthatches Red-breasted nuthatch Creeper Brown creeper (b) Wrens Bewick's wren (b) Kinglets Golden-crowned kinglet Ruby-crowned kinglet Thrushes Western bluebird (b) Hermit thrush Varied thrush American robin (b) Mockingbirds Northern mockingbird (b) Starlings European starling (b) Waxwings Cedar waxwing Warblers Orange-crowned warbler Yellow warbler Yellow-rumped warbler Black-throated gray warbler Townsend's warbler Wilson's warbler (b) Sparrows Spotted towhee California towhee (b) Fox sparrow Song sparrow (b) Lincoln's sparrow White-throated sparrow White-crowned sparrow Golden-crowned sparrow Dark-eyed junco (b) Cardinals Western tanager Black-headed grosbeak Blackbirds Red-winged blackbird (b) Tricolored blackbird Brewer's blackbird Western meadowlark Brown-headed cowbird (b) Hooded oriole (b) Bullock's oriole (b) Finches Purple finch House finch (b) Lesser goldfinch American goldfinch Old-world Sparrows House sparrow * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Ardenwood Historic Farm * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * A Guide to the Birds of * 34600 Ardenwood Blvd. Fremont, CA 94555 (510) 544-2797 awvisit@ebparks.org Welcome to Ardenwood Historic Farm, a 205-acre regional preserve operated by the East Bay Regional Park District. While Ardenwood is most commonly known for its farm animals and Victorian heritage, the park is also an island for bird life. Surrounded by suburban development, Ardenwood’s open fields, manicured gardens and shaded eucalyptus groves provide ideal habitat for both resident and migrant birds. This brochure is designed to guide your birding adventure at Ardenwood. The list shows relative abundance - the likelihood of seeing an individual bird species during a given month. Birding is one of the most popular pastimes in North America, and data collected from amateur and professional birders contributes to improving habitat on public and private lands. If you would like to share your observations with the park staff, return your completed list to the Ardenwood Train Station.Your data will help to keep this brochure up-to-date in the future. Birding in the East Bay regional Parks The East Bay Regional Park District offers a number of guided birding programs for birders of all skill and experience levels. Check the latest Regional in Nature newsletter for upcoming programs, or visit our website to learn more: www.ebparks.org. Jan Feb M ar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Birds of Ardenwood Waterfowl *Canada goose *Mallard *Bufflehead Gamebirds *California quail *Wild turkey Cormorants *Double-crested cormorant Pelicans *American white pelican Herons & Egrets *Great blue heron *Great egret *Snowy egret *Black-crowned night heron Vultures *Turkey vulture Osprey *Osprey Hawks & Eagles *White-tailed kite *Northern harrier *Sharp-shinned hawk *Cooper's hawk *Red-shouldered hawk (b) *Red-tailed hawk (b) *Golden eagle Falcons *American kestrel (b) *Merlin *Peregrine falcon Shorebirds *Kildeer Gulls * * * * * * * * *Ring-billed gull *California gull *Glaucous-winged gull Doves & Pigeons *Rock pigeon(b) *Mourning dove(b) Owls *Great horned owl (b) Hummingbirds *Anna's hummingbird (b) *Rufous hummingbird *Allen's hummingbird (b) Woodpeckers *Red-breasted sapsucker *Nuttall's woodpecker(b) *Downy woodpecker (b) *Hairy woodpecker *Northern flicker Flycatchers Olive-sided flycatcher Pacific-slope flycatcher (b) Black phoebe (b) Say's phoebe Ash-throated flycatcher Western kingbird Shrikes Loggerhead shrike Vireos Hutton's vireo Corvids Steller's jay (b) Western scrub jay (b) American crow Common raven * * * * * * * * * * * * Symbols for bird occurence * (b) Abundant = nearly always occurs in appropriate habitats, usually in large to moderate numbers. Common = usually occurs in appropriate habitats in moderate to small numbers. Uncommon = expected in appropriate habitats in very small numbers. Rare = limited records; may be absent in some years. Individual Record = generally a single sighting of a single bird. breeding confirmed or expected * * * *
All of our farm animals are friendly, so feel free to walk up and meet them! As you explore, please be respectful of our animals and do not chase or harass them. Remember, you are visiting their home. 34600 Ardenwood Blvd. Fremont, CA 94555 510-544-2797 awvisit@ebparks.org Trent Pearce East Bay Trent Pearce Regional Park District We also provide Farmyard school programs throughout the year. To find out more or to schedule a program call us at 510-544-2797 or email awvisit@ebparks.org Trent Pearce Text: Jenna Scimeca Design: Nick Cavagnaro Cover Photos: Trent Pearce & Ira Bletz Nick Cavagnaro This brochure is provided as a public service of the Interpretive and Recreation Services Department of the East Bay Regional Park District. CHLORIN E 10/12 r 100% me su East Bay Regional Park District 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, P.O. Box 5381 Oakland, CA 94605-0381 1-888-EBPARKS www.ebparks.org TDD phone 510-633-0460 n Co ED EE FR © iStockphoto Our farm animals are fed regularly each day. Children and adults can help out in our afternoon feedings, Thursday through Sunday at 3pm. Please do not feed the animals on your own. They have specific diets. Too much or different food can make them sick. Po st Eating mostly alfalfa pellets and fresh vegetables, rabbits are different from our ruminant farm animals. They are hindgut digesters. This means rabbits eat some of their own droppings in order to extract all the nutrition from their food. A rabbit’s digestive system makes up 40% of its entire body. 10 0% For thousands of years, rabbits have been a source of food and clothing. Originally rabbits were hunted in the wild. Later, people realized that farming them would be easier and more productive. Today, rabbits have gone beyond farms and into homes as our pets. PROCES S Rabbits Ardenwood Farm Animals Ardenwood Historic Farm If you would like to participate in farm chores, feedings and other activities, check out our Naturalist programs on our website www.ebparks.org/activities. Ardenwood Farm Animals Pigs Welcome to Ardenwood Historic Farm! We have many animals that we care for and in return, these animals provide food, clothes, and more for us. Let’s go visit our farm animals and learn a little about what makes these animals special. Over the years, pigs have received a bad reputation for being the messiest farm animals. They are actually very organized and clean. Pigs divide their pens into separate living, eating, playing, and bathroom areas. They also like mud, but not just for some messy fun. Mud helps keep pigs sunburn-free and cool on hot days, especially since they can’t sweat. June Hyatt Goats Sheep Trent Pearce Look out for that kid! That’s right—just like young children, young goats are called kids. Goats are very useful farm animals. Like cows, goats are ruminants. They also provide meat, hair, and milk. Many people enjoy knitting with soft angora yarn which is made from goats. © iStockphoto Worldwide, people drink more goats’ milk than milk from cows. John Krzesinski Cows Trent Pearce Think about what you had for breakfast this morning. Did you eat sausage or bacon? This and many other cuts of meat come from pigs. These fine swine provide meat on a farm. So the next time your parents tell you your room looks like a pig pen, thank them, because that’s a compliment! June Hyatt Cows are ruminants, just like our goats and sheep. Ruminant animals chew cud and have four-compartment stomachs. Cud is partially swallowed food that gets regurgitated and chewed again.You can tell an animal is chewing cud when it looks as though it is chomping on bubble gum. Farmers raise cows because they provide many necessary things such as milk, meat, leather hides, and other products. Are you wearing leather shoes? You are wearing cow hide! Do you like cheese and yogurt? Those are often made from cows’ milk. Trent Pearce These are our fleeciest friends. Sheep have been around as livestock for a long time. In fact, sheep were one of the first animals to be domesticated by humans about 11,000 years ago. From sheep we get milk, meat, and more importantly, wool for blankets and clothing. As with other farm animals we also get manure, a very good source of soil enrichment for crops and gardens. Chickens Where are the chickens? These fine feathery fowl can be seen throughout the farmyard.You’ll find them scratching and pecking freely at the ground as they look for seeds and insects to eat. We let the chickens out for daily exercise to keep them healthy. Amongst the chickens we have both hens (adult females) and roosters (adult males). On a farm, chickens are a source of meat, eggs, manure, and feathers. © iStockphoto
Ardenwood Wildflowers A photographic guide to showy wildflowers of Ardenwood Historic Farm Sorted by Flower Color Photographs by Wilde Legard Botanist, East Bay Regional Park District Revision: February 23, 2007 More than 2,000 species of native and naturalized plants grow wild in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most are very difficult to identify without the help of good illustrations. This is designed to be a simple, color photo guide to help you identify some of these plants. The selection of showy wildflowers displayed in this guide is by no means complete. The intent is to expand the quality and quantity of photos over time. The revision date is shown on the cover and on the header of each photo page. A comprehensive plant list for this area (including the many species not found in this publication) can be downloaded at the East Bay Regional Park District’s wild plant download page at: http://www.ebparks.org. This guide is published electronically in Adobe Acrobat® format to accommodate these planned updates. You have permission to freely download and distribute, and print this pdf for individual use. You are not allowed to sell the electronic or printed versions. In this version of the guide, only showy wildflowers are included. These wildflowers are sorted first by flower color, then by plant family (similar flower types), and finally by scientific name within each family. Under each photograph are four lines of information, based on the current standard wild plant reference for California: The Jepson Manual: Higher Plants of California, 1993. Common Name These non-standard names are based on Jepson and other local references. Scientific Name Scientific names revised since 1993 are NOT included in this edition. Origin & Longevity Native or Introduced. Annual, Biennial, Perennial, or a combination. Family Name The common plant family name according to Jepson. For readers that prefer a more comprehensive guide, sorted by scientific name, please download the “wild plants” version of this guide. Readers are encouraged to email any suggestions or corrections to wlegard@ebparks.org. All photographs are © 2006 Wilde Legard, all rights reserved. revision 2/23/2007 Wildflowers of Ardenwood Regional Preserve White California Buckeye Aesculus californica Native Perennial Buckeye Family Common Yard Knotweed Polygonum arenastrum Introduced Annual Buckwheat Family Poison Hemlock Conium maculatum Introduced Biennial Carrot Family Blue Elderberry Sambucus mexicana Native Perennial Honeysuckle Family Hidden-flower Cheeseweed Malva parviflora Introduced Annual Mallow Family Field Bindweed Convolvulus arvensis Introduced Perennial Morning-Glory Family White Clover Trifolium repens Introduced Perennial Pea Family Mouse-ear Chickweed Cerastium glomeratum Introduced Annual Pink Family Page 1 of 9 revision 2/23/2007 Common Chickweed Stellaria media Introduced Annual Pink Family Wildflowers of Ardenwood Regional Preserve English Plantain Plantago lanceolata Introduced Annual Plantain Family Himalayan Blackberry Rubus discolor Introduced Perennial Rose Family White Native California Blackberry Rubus ursinus Native Perennial Rose Family Page 2 of 9 revision 2/23/2007 Wildflowers of Ardenwood Regional Preserve Yellow Puncture Vine Tribulus terrestris Introduced Annual Caltrop Family Sweet Fennel Foeniculum vulgare Introduced Perennial Carrot Family Black Mustard Brassica nigra Introduced Annual Mustard Family Yellow Field Mustard Brassica rapa Introduced Annual Mustard Family Bermuda Buttercup Oxalis pes-caprae Introduced Perennial Oxalis Family Bird's-foot Deerweed Lotus corniculatus Introduced Perennial Pea Family California Bur Clover Medicago polymorpha Introduced Annual Pea Family Sour Clover Melilotus indica Introduced Annual-Biennial Pea Family Page 3 of 9 revision 2/23/2007 Wildflowers of Ardenwood Regional Preserve Yellow Common Purslane Portulaca oleracea Introduced Perennial Purslane Family Yellow Johnny-tuck Triphysaria eriantha ssp. eriantha Native Annual Snapdragon Family Yellow Star Thistle Centaurea solstitialis Introduced Annual Sunflower Family Pineapple Weed Chamomilla suaveolens Introduced Annual Sunflower Family Brass Buttons Cotula coronopifolia Introduced Perennial Sunflower Family Dandelion-leaf Hawk's-beard Crepis vesicaria ssp. taraxifolia Introduced Annual-Biennial Sunflower Family Smooth Cat's-ear Hypochaeris glabra Introduced Annual Sunflower Family Bristly Ox-tongue Picris echioides Introduced Annual-Biennial Sunflower Family Page 4 of 9 revision 2/23/2007 Common Groundsel Senecio vulgaris Introduced Annual Sunflower Family Wildflowers of Ardenwood Regional Preserve Prickly Sow Thistle Sonchus asper ssp. asper Introduced Annual Sunflower Family Common Sow Thistle Sonchus oleraceus Introduced Annual Sunflower Family Yellow Page 5 of 9 Common Dandelion Taraxacum officinale Introduced Biennial-Perennial Sunflower Family revision 2/23/20
Wild Plants of Ardenwood Historic Farm Common Name Version A Photographic Guide Sorted by Form, Color and Family with Habitat Descriptions and Identification Notes Photographs and text by Wilde Legard District Botanist, East Bay Regional Park District New Revised and Expanded Edition - Includes the latest scientific names, habitat descriptions and identification notes Decimal Inches .1 .2 .3 .4 1/8 1/4 .5 .6 1/2 .7 .8 .9 3/4 1 .5 2 .5 3 .5 4 .5 5 .5 6 .5 7 .5 8 .5 9 1 1/2 2 1/2 3 1/2 4 1/2 5 1/2 6 1/2 7 1/2 8 1/2 9 English Inches Notes: A Photographic Guide to the Wild Plants of Ardenwood Historic Farm More than 2,000 species of native and naturalized plants grow wild in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most are very difficult to identify without the help of good illustrations. This is designed to be a simple, color photo guide to help you identify some of these plants. This guide is published electronically in Adobe Acrobat® format so that it can easily be updated as additional photographs become available. You have permission to freely download, distribute and print this guide for individual use. Photographs are © 2014 Wilde Legard, all rights reserved. In this guide, the included plants are sorted first by form (Ferns & Fern-like, Grasses & Grass-like, Herbaceous, Woody), then by most common flower color, and finally by similar looking flowers (grouped by genus within each family). Each photograph has the following information, separated by '-': COMMON NAME (Scientific Name) Origin & Longevity Family Name (Bloom date range) Habitat ID Characteristics Additional notes Revision: 3/2/2014 According to The Jepson Manual: Vascular Plants of California, Second Edition (JM2) and other references (not standardized). According to JM2 and eFlora (ucjeps.berkeley.edu/IJM.html). Native, Naturalized, or Waif (not reproducing without human care). Annual, Biennial, Perennial, or a combination. Common family name according to JM2, Period during the year when the plant blooms, according to JM2 and other sources. '-' if plant does not bloom (ie. Ferns). Habitat description according to JM2 and other sources. Plant description with identification characteristics and other notes, based on multiple sources including: Annotated Checklist of the East Bay Flora, Second Edition (2013), JM2, Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region (Revised Edition), and Weeds of California and Other Western States. Occasionally, an additional note may appear (ie. NOXIOUS weed, INVASIVE weed, Fed & Calif. ENDANGERED, etc.). Grass-like - Green/Brown SLENDER WILD OAT (Avena barbata) Naturalized Annual - Grass Family - (Mar–Jun) Disturbed sites - Plants gen 24-32". Spikelets 0.8-1.2" long. Awns 0.8-1.8" long. Lemma tip bristles >= 0.1" long. Seeds EDIBLE whole or ground for flour. INVASIVE weed. Wild Plants of Ardenwood Historic Farm - Sorted by Form, Color and Family WILD OAT (Avena fatua) Naturalized Annual Grass Family - (Apr–Jun) - Disturbed sites Plants 1-5' tall. Spikelets 0.7-1.3" long. Low awn 1-1.6" long. Lemma tip bristles < 0.04" long. Seeds EDIBLE whole or ground for flour. INVASIVE weed. CALIFORNIA BROME (Bromus carinatus var. carinatus) Native Perennial - Grass Family (Apr–Aug) - Coastal prairies, openings in chaparral, plains, open oak and pine woodland -Plant 20-40” tall. Flower cluster 6-16” long. Spikelet 0.8-1.6” long. Lemma 0.5-0.8” long, hairy, awn 0.3-0.6” long. Page 1 RESCUE GRASS (Bromus catharticus var. catharticus) Naturalized Annual-Perennial - Grass Family - (Apr–Nov) - Open, disturbed places Plant 8-48” tall. Flower cluster 3-12” long, ~ open. Spikelet flattened, 0.6-1.2” long. Lemma 0.4-0.7” long, awn < 0.2” long. Revision: 3/2/2014 Grass-like - Green/Brown Wild Plants of Ardenwood Historic Farm - Sorted by Form, Color and Family Page 2 RIPGUT GRASS (Bromus diandrus) Naturalized Annual - Grass Family - (Apr–Jul) - Open, gen disturbed areas - Plant 6-40" tall. Spikelet 1-2.8" long. Lemma body 0.8-1.2" long, awn > 1.2" long. Barbed seeds can stick in flesh of animals. INVASIVE weed. SOFT CHESS (Bromus hordeaceus) Naturalized Annual - Grass Family - (Apr–Jul) - Fields, disturbed areas - Plant 4-26” tall. Leaf hairy. Flower cluster 1-5” long, dense, some stalks > spikelet. Spikelet 0.5-0.9”. Lemma 0.26-0.4”, awn 0.16-0.4”. INVASIVE weed. RED BROME (Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens) Naturalized Annual - Grass Family (Mar–Jun) - Disturbed areas, roadsides - Plant 4-20". Flower cluster condensed, branches obscure, < spikelets. Stem & sheathes hairy. INVASIVE weed. SMOOTH PAMPAS GRASS (Cortaderia selloana) Naturalized Perennial - Grass Family (Sep–Mar) - Disturbed sites - Plant 6-13' tall. Leaf blades 0.1-0.5" wide, sheathes smooth. Cultivar, rarely escaped. INVASIVE weed. ORCHARD GRASS (Dactylis glomerata) Naturalized Perennial - Grass Family (May–Aug) - Disturbed, often moist sites - Stems 2-5, 12-79”+ tall. Leaf blade 0.12-0.24” wide. Flower cluster 1.6-8” long. Spike

also available

National Parks
USFS NW