Fort Tejon

State Historic Park - California

Fort Tejon in California is a former United States Army outpost which was intermittently active from June 24, 1854, until September 11, 1864. It is located in the Grapevine Canyon (La Cañada de las Uvas) between the San Emigdio Mountains and Tehachapi Mountains. It is in the area of Tejon Pass along Interstate 5 in Kern County, California, the main route through the mountain ranges separating the Central Valley from the Los Angeles Basin and Southern California. The fort's location protected the San Joaquin Valley from the south and west.

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Recreation Map of Chumas Wilderness in Los Padres National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Los Padres - Chumash Wilderness

Recreation Map of Chumas Wilderness in Los Padres National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Mt. Pinos, Ojai and Santa Barbara Ranger Districts (RD) of Los Padres National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Los Padres MVUM - Mt. Pinos, Ojai, Santa Barbara 2018

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Mt. Pinos, Ojai and Santa Barbara Ranger Districts (RD) of Los Padres National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=585 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Tejon Fort Tejon in California is a former United States Army outpost which was intermittently active from June 24, 1854, until September 11, 1864. It is located in the Grapevine Canyon (La Cañada de las Uvas) between the San Emigdio Mountains and Tehachapi Mountains. It is in the area of Tejon Pass along Interstate 5 in Kern County, California, the main route through the mountain ranges separating the Central Valley from the Los Angeles Basin and Southern California. The fort's location protected the San Joaquin Valley from the south and west.
Fort Tejon State Historic Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Walk among Fort Tejon’s buildings, sites, and ruins. Imagine the lives of the soldiers and civilians, and understand the struggles of early life in California. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (661) 248-6692. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Fort Tejon State Historic Park 4201 Fort Tejon Road / P.O. Box 895 Lebec, CA 93243 (661) 248-6692 © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) Soldier reenactment, 1994 A t the top of Grapevine Canyon, the adobe buildings of Fort Tejon State Historic Park guard a beautiful, tree-lined meadow. Between 1854 and 1864, this U.S. Army fort protected people in the surrounding region from the social and cultural conflicts between American settlers and California Indians. Fort Tejon, at an elevation of over 3,500 feet, is situated in the rugged Tehachapi Mountains near Tejon Pass on I-5. Summer temperatures are often in the high 80s and can exceed 100 degrees. Winter temperatures can dip to freezing, with the possibility of snow. Grapevine Canyon is known for occasional strong winds. EARLY HISTORY Prior to the establishment of Fort Tejon, the Emigdiano group of Native Californians called this area home. An inland group of the coastal Chumash people, the Emigdiano lived in a large village at the bottom of Grapevine Canyon and had one village, Sausu, along Castac Lake. Unlike the coastal groups, they had little contact with European explorers and settlers before the mid-1800s. Founding of a Fort The gold discovery drew thousands of people to California in the 1850s. Confrontations between the Emigdiano, would-be miners, and land-hungry settlers were frequent. The U.S. government tried to mitigate the situation by establishing reservations, including the Sebastian Reservation at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley in 1853. Because the animals were in poor condition and expensive to feed, the camel herd was transferred after less than a year to the Los Angeles Quartermaster Depot. There they were used in a failed experiment to cut the expense of messenger service between Los Angeles and Fort Mojave. The animals were then moved to the Benicia Army Arsenal and eventually sold at auction. The Closure of Fort Tejon Living History program participants For almost ten years, Fort Tejon provided a source of employment, protection, and social In July 1854 Lieutenant Alfred Latimer and activities for local residents. The foremost a small detachment of dragoons established duties of the dragoons a camp at the reservation. However, the new stationed here were to camp lacked water, forage for horses, and protect and control the timber for construction. That August, Major native Emigdiano living J.L. Donaldson, the Quartermaster, moved on the Sebastian (also the post to the top of Grapevine Canyon, 17 known as the Tejon) miles southwest of the reservation. This site Reservation, and to contained everything necessary to sustain a deter raids by the large military outpost. Paiutes, Chemeheuvi, The First U.S. Dragoons arrived on August Mojave, and other 10, 1854, and began construction of more desert-dwelling than 40 military buildings. A small civilian groups. The community developed just south of the dragoons’ widefort to provide supplies and labor to the ranging patrols military. In 1858 the Overland Mail Company covered most established a station in the sutler’s (trader’s) of central and store at the fort. southern California and The Camel Experiment sometimes During the late 1850s, the U.S. Army extended as experimented with camels, hoping to far as Utah. improve transport across the arid west; in Volunteer portraying 1859 camels were brought to Fort Tejon, a dragoon. where the Army took charge of them. With the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, the dragoons were sent to guard Los Angeles and later transferred east to fight in the war. In the summer of 1862, violence erupted between the encroaching white settlers and the Owens Valley Paiute, who wanted to protect their lands. Three cavalry companies of California Volunteers forcibly moved the Paiute to the Sebastian Reservation, but the authorities there refused to accept responsibility for them. In 1863, several hundred of these Indians were brought to Fort Tejon, which was then being used by the California Volunteers. With little or no food, clothing,
Nuestra Misión Parque Estatal Histórico Fort Tejon La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Camine entre los edificios, sitios y ruinas de Fort Tejon e imagine la vida de los soldados y de los civiles para comprender los esfuerzos que implicaba la vida de los California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (661) 248-6692. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. primeros tiempos de California. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Fort Tejon State Historic Park 4201 Fort Tejon Road / P.O. Box 895 Lebec, CA 93243 (661) 248-6692 © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) Recreación de los soldados, 1994 E n la cima Grapevine Canyon, los edificios de adobe del Parque Estatal Histórico Fort Tejon protegen una hermosa pradera bordeada por árboles. Entre 1854 y 1864, este fuerte del ejército de los Estados Unidos protegía a la gente de los alrededores de los conflictos sociales y culturales entre los colonos estadounidenses y los indios de California. Fort Tejon, a una altura de más de 3,500 pies (1070 metros), está ubicado en las escabrosas sierras Tehachapi cerca del Puerto Tejón sobre la ruta interestatal 5. En general, las temperaturas de verano son de 80 °F (27 °C) y pueden superar los 100 °F (38 °C). Las temperaturas de invierno puede llegar a cero con posibilidades de nevadas. Grapevine Canyon es conocida por sus fuertes vientos ocasionales. HISTORIA DE LOS PRIMEROS AÑOS Antes de que se estableciera Fort Tejon, el grupo emigdiano de nativos californianos se referían a esta área como su casa. Los emigdianos eran un grupo continental del pueblo costero chumash que vivía en una gran villa al pie de Grapevine Canyon y tenían una villa, sausu, a lo largo de Castac Lake. A diferencia de los grupos costeros, tuvieron poco contacto con los exploradores y colonos europeos antes de mediados de 1800. Fundación del fuerte En la década de 1850, el descubrimiento de oro atrajo miles de personas a California. Los enfrentamientos eran frecuentes entre suministros y mano de obra al ejército. En 1858, la compañía de transporte Overland Mail Company estableció una estación en la tienda del comerciante del fuerte. Participantes del programa historia viviente El experimento con camellos A fines de 1850, el ejército de los Estados Unidos experimentó con camellos con la esperanza de mejorar el transporte a lo largo del árido oeste. En 1859, los camellos se introdujeron en Fort Tejon, donde el ejército se encargó de ellos. Debido a que los animales se encontraban en malas condiciones y era costoso alimentarlos, la manada de camellos se trasladó luego de menos de un año al puesto de furrieles de Los Ángeles. Fueron utilizados en un experimento fallido para reducir los costos del servicio de mensajería entre Los Ángeles y Fort Mojave. Posteriormente, los animales fueron trasladados al Arsenal Benicia y finalmente se vendieron en una subasta. los emigdianos, los supuestos mineros y los colonos sedientos de tierras. En 1853, el gobierno de los Estados Unidos intentó mitigar la situación estableciendo reservas, incluida la Reserva Sebastian en el extremo sur del valle de San Joaquín. En julio de 1854, el teniente Alfred Latimer y un pequeño destacamento de soldados dragones establecieron un campamento en la reserva. Sin embargo, el nuevo campamento carecía de agua, forrajes para los caballos y madera para construcción. Ese agosto, el mayor J.L. Donaldson, el furriel, trasladó el puesto a la cima de Grapevine Canyon, a 17 millas al suroeste de la reserva. El lugar contaba con todo lo necesario para sustentar un puesto de avanzada militar de gran tamaño. Los primeros soldados dragones de los Estados Unidos llegaron el 10 de agosto de 1854 y comenzaron la construcción de más de 40 edificios militares. Justo al sur del fuerte, se desarrolló una pequeña Un voluntario recreando a un soldado dragón comunidad de civiles para proporcionar El cierre de Fort Tejon alimentos, ropa y otros suministros, las Por casi diez años, Fort filas de los indios se Tejon proporcionó una redujeron debido a fuente de empleo, las enfermedades, protección y actividades la hambruna y la sociales para los residentes deserción hasta locales. Las obligaciones 1864, cuando fueron principales de los soldados transferidos a la dragones apostados aquí Reserva india Tule eran proteger y controlar Las amapolas de Calif

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