Henry W. Coe

State Park - California

Henry W. Coe State Park (or Coe Park for short) preserves a vast tract of the Diablo Range. The park is located closest to the city of Morgan Hill, and is located in both Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties. The park contains over 87,000 acres (35,000 ha), making it the largest state park in northern California, and the second-largest in the state (after Anza-Borrego Desert State Park). Managed within its boundaries is a designated wilderness area of about 22,000 acres (8,900 ha). This is officially known as the Henry W. Coe State Wilderness, but locally as the Orestimba Wilderness.

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Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=561 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_W._Coe_State_Park Henry W. Coe State Park (or Coe Park for short) preserves a vast tract of the Diablo Range. The park is located closest to the city of Morgan Hill, and is located in both Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties. The park contains over 87,000 acres (35,000 ha), making it the largest state park in northern California, and the second-largest in the state (after Anza-Borrego Desert State Park). Managed within its boundaries is a designated wilderness area of about 22,000 acres (8,900 ha). This is officially known as the Henry W. Coe State Wilderness, but locally as the Orestimba Wilderness.
Our Mission Henry W. Coe State Park The mission of the California Department of Parks and Recreation is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. This magnificent park greets visitors with miles of trails and many small lakes, ponds and seasonal creeks to lighten California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (408) 779-2728. This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting: CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P. O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.TM Henry W. Coe State Park 9000 East Dunne Avenue Morgan Hill, CA 95037 (408) 779-2728 © 2009 California State Parks Printed on Recycled Paper their path. B arely an hour’s winter, seasonal creeks drive southeast of can overflow and San Jose, Henry become dangerously W. Coe State impassable. Spring Park protects and fall are the and preserves most temperate and 87,000 acres of enjoyable times to scenic hills and visit. Prepare for the mountain ridges. variable climate and This wild, largely rugged landscape by Scenic hill and mountain ridge views undeveloped dressing in layers. park welcomes PARK HISTORY backpackers, equestrians, mountain bikers, Native People day-hikers, and anyone seeking solitude in a The indigenous people in this area probably nearly untouched setting. Part of the Diablo included the Ohlone and the Northern Range, the park is an amalgam of high ridges, Valley Yokuts. At the time of European plateaus, and both narrow and open valleys. contact, Ohlone territory extended from After a rainy winter, wildflowers bloom in San Francisco Bay south to the Carmel profusion from February through March; by Valley area, and east into the Diablo April the color is rampant. The landscape Range. The lower San Joaquin River and its is rich with blue lupine and orange-yellow tributaries formed the core of the Northern California poppies, bright yellow gold fields Yokuts homeland. The semi-permanent and delicate baby blue eyes. Mariposa watercourses on the east side of the lilies, larkspur, blue dicks and Ithuriel’s Diablo Range were sparsely inhabited. The spear show themselves in late April and native people were semi-nomadic, moving May. The variety and richness of the flora seasonally to harvest acorns, seeds, berries, attract visitors from miles around. roots and other foods vital to their diet. They Hot, dry summers bring highs above 90, hunted, fished, and periodically set fires cooling to the 50s at night. Hikers should to increase yields of certain plants, such carry—and drink—plenty of water, even as grass and seeds, and to maintain forage on less-strenuous trails. Winter is wet, with plants to attract game. highs in the 50s and lows in the 30s. In With the arrival of the Spanish, the Ohlone were recruited into the missions, ending their way of life. As native populations near the coastal missions dwindled, missionaries gathered converts from farther inland, reaching into the Diablo Range and ultimately the San Joaquin Valley. The strenuous mission routines, which were completely foreign to the native people’s way of life, took a heavy toll on them. Unable to fight off new diseases brought by the Europeans, the native population was nearly decimated. In 1834, when the Mexican government ordered the missions secularized, the promise to return the lands to the remaining mission Indians was not honored. Native people, now displaced from the missions and from their traditional homelands, were left to fend for themselves. Some found work on cattle ranches in the vicinity of today’s park, herding cattle and the wild mustangs that populated the Orestimba South Fork near Mustang Flat. Today, Ohlone descendants—including members of the Muwekma, Rumsen and Mutsun groups—are working toward federal recognition. THE COE LEGACY Pine Ridge Ranch New Hampshire native Henry W. Coe established the Willow Ranch in the Santa Clara Valley in 1858 rain, three seasonal Birdwatchers will find common birds and acquired the San watersheds—Coyote, such as turkey vultures, Steller’s jays, and Felipe Ranch in the Orestimba and Pacheco California quail, and noteworthy birds 1860s. This purchase creeks—can become like California thrashers and Lesser and brought Coe’s sons, whitewater torrents. Lawrence goldfinches. California king snakes Henry Jr. and Charles, Dozens of small lakes in and Pacific gopher snakes are harmless, but into the cattle ranching the park were created be wary of western rattlesnakes. business. In the late by former ranchers; Fire in the Park Coe Ranch Visitor Center entrance 18
Coe Ranch Campground at Henry W. Coe State Park 9000 East Dunne Avenue • Morgan Hill, CA 95037 • (408) 779-2728 Henry W. Coe State Park is the largest state park in Northern California, with over 87,000 acres of wild open spaces. The Coe Ranch Campground consists of 20 drive-in sites, located on top of Pine Ridge at 2,600 feet. Some campsites offer many beautiful panoramic views; others are beneath shady oaks. Sites not located beneath trees have shade ramadas. Reservations are strongly advised on weekends. CAMPING: The narrow and winding road to the park may not be suitable for large motor vehicles. About half of the Coe Ranch Campground will accommodate motor homes up to 25 feet long and trailers up to 20 feet long. Considered primitive, the campground has piped water and nearby vault toilets, but no showers or hookups. season, wood campfires and charcoal may be banned—check with park staff. You may use your own barbecue, but dump the ashes into a fire ring. Due to the fire danger, fires are prohibited in the backcountry. Gathering wood in the park is not allowed. Purchase firewood at the visitor center. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Use the self-registration system if the visitor center is closed. DOGS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under supervision at all times. They are not allowed on the dirt roads and backcountry trails, except for the Live Oak Trail, which starts at the visitor center and ends .4 miles away at the overflow entrance parking lot. Dogs are allowed within the campground and along paved roads. Please clean up after your pets. They must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night. OCCUPANCY: Eight people are allowed per family campsite. Reservation fees include one vehicle and one legally towed-in vehicle. Extra vehicles will be charged a fee. VEHICLE PARKING: Vehicles may only be parked in the assigned campsite. They must remain on the pavement and must not extend into the roadway beyond the campsite number or limit line. Standard campsites that can accommodate an RV can fit more than one car per site. Tent-only sites can fit only one car. Please register all vehicles for your campsite at the entrance station before parking. CAMPSITES: Ropes or lines may not be attached to any plant, fence or park structure. Tents and other equipment must be confined to the space assigned. Tents are not allowed on paved areas. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in is 2 p.m. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers. GENERATORS may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. PROTECTION OF NATURAL FEATURES: All plants, animals, rocks and other natural features are protected and must not be collected, defaced or damaged. FISHING is permitted in accordance with state regulations, and a fishing information handout is available at the visitor center. MOTOR VEHICLES are restricted to the entry roads and parking areas. The park’s dirt roads and trails are closed to motor vehicles. HIKING: Most people come to Henry W. Coe State Park to hike over 250 miles of dirt roads and trails. The steep roads and trails can test the endurance of even experienced hikers, so be sure to pack plenty of water and food, and carry a map with you. If you hike alone, let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. BICYCLING: Bikes are not allowed in the wilderness area, and cross-country bicycling is prohibited. Many roads and trails are extremely steep and dangerous for bike riders. Some trails are closed to bikes. You should be in top physical condition HAZARDS TO RECOGNIZE AND AVOID and expect to walk your bike in many areas. Few trails are suitable for beginners. Bikes are not allowed in the Orestimba Tick Poison Oak Rattlesnake Wilderness Area. NOISE: Radios and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond the immediate campsite, regardless of day or night. All amplified music must be off by 10 p.m. CAMPERS UNDER 18 must be accompanied by an adult or have written permission from a parent or guardian to camp overnight. FIRES are allowed in the fire rings provided. During fire Discover the many states of California.TM CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting the California State Parks at (800) 777-0369 or 711, TTY relay service. Certain designated trails close to headquarters are also off limits to bikes. Bicyclists should yield the right of way to hikers and horseback riders. The speed limit is 15 mph. Slow down on narrow trails as safety requires. The park has about 64,000 acres open to mountain bikes and is one of the most bike-friendly parks in the Bay Area. Please keep it that way and ride your bike in a r

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