by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Humboldt Redwoods

State Park - California

Humboldt Redwoods State Park contains Rockefeller Forest, the world's largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coast redwoods. It is located 30 miles (48 km) south of Eureka, California, near Weott in southern Humboldt County, within Northern California, named after the great nineteenth-century scientist, Alexander von Humboldt. The park was established by the Save-the-Redwoods League in 1921 largely from lands purchased from the Pacific Lumber Company. Beginning with the dedication of the Raynal Bolling Memorial Grove, it has grown to become the third-largest park in the California State Park system, now containing 51,651 acres (20,902 ha) through acquisitions and gifts to the state. It is part of the Northern California coastal forests ecoregion and has 23,600 acres (96 km2) of old-growth forests. 17,000 acres (69 km2) are old-growth redwoods, comprising the entire Bull Creek watershed and the Rockefeller Forest. Nearby U.S. Route 101, which generally follows the Eel River and its South Fork in this part of the North Coast, offers easy access to the park and nearby towns with connections to the scenic highway, Avenue of the Giants, also mostly located within or near park boundaries.
https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=425 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humboldt_Redwoods_State_Park Humboldt Redwoods State Park contains Rockefeller Forest, the world's largest remaining contiguous old-growth forest of coast redwoods. It is located 30 miles (48 km) south of Eureka, California, near Weott in southern Humboldt County, within Northern California, named after the great nineteenth-century scientist, Alexander von Humboldt. The park was established by the Save-the-Redwoods League in 1921 largely from lands purchased from the Pacific Lumber Company. Beginning with the dedication of the Raynal Bolling Memorial Grove, it has grown to become the third-largest park in the California State Park system, now containing 51,651 acres (20,902 ha) through acquisitions and gifts to the state. It is part of the Northern California coastal forests ecoregion and has 23,600 acres (96 km2) of old-growth forests. 17,000 acres (69 km2) are old-growth redwoods, comprising the entire Bull Creek watershed and the Rockefeller Forest. Nearby U.S. Route 101, which generally follows the Eel River and its South Fork in this part of the North Coast, offers easy access to the park and nearby towns with connections to the scenic highway, Avenue of the Giants, also mostly located within or near park boundaries.
Humboldt Redwoods State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Thanks to a few concerned preservationists, the breathtaking majesty of these prehistoric giants thrills all who seek their California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 946-2263. This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting: CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369. (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Humboldt Redwoods State Park Avenue of the Giants / P.O. Box 100 Weott, CA 95571 (707) 946-2263 © 2011 California State Parks (Rev. 2014) peace and grandeur. H own geographic area and selfumboldt Redwoods identity, but all groups formed State Park harbors the a larger economy that delivered largest remaining old-growth goods for trade as far as the redwood forest in the world. Eastern United States. The park’s unique 52,000-acre This area was likely more environment has more than densely populated before 17,000 acres of breathtaking European incursion than it ancient coast redwood and is now. Today more than ten Douglas-fir trees. Varied percent of the population of recreational areas beckon to Humboldt County are Native all adventurous park visitors. Old-growth redwood forest American, including many Weather changes quickly on people of Sinkyone descent who live along the north coast. Between October and May, the north coast. the park receives about 80 inches of rain, The traditional practices passed down and temperatures range from lows in the through generations of Sinkyone experience 20s to highs in the mid-50s. Though not a created a highly productive environment. common event, snow may fall at elevations Conservation and restoration projects above 1,500 feet. Summers are usually dry, headed by local tribal groups, using timewith occasional rainy days and morning fog tested methods, have been instrumental in that generally burns off by noon. bringing healing to the landscape. PARK HISTORY Saving the Trees Native People Beginning in the 1850s, European settlers The Sinkyone people lived in the area of in the area began to cut large Humboldt Redwoods State Park’s southern stands of redwood trees to region for thousands of years before clear the land for pastures and European contact. The boundaries of farms. Lumber soon became a Sinkyone lands extended east to the main vital industry, and forested land stem of the Eel River and the river’s South suddenly increased in value. Fork, south beyond today’s town of Leggett, Many people, however, and west to the ocean. believed that the huge old The name Sinkyone was assigned by 20thredwood trees were inherently century ethnographers to classify separate significant and should be held political groups who spoke the same dialect in perpetual trust. In 1918, the of the Athabascan language family. Each Save the Redwoods League was distinct political group maintained its formed to accomplish what their name implies — the salvation of one of the world’s great wonders. Thanks to the League and its supporters, more than 189,000 acres of California’s redwood forest lands have been preserved for future generations of park visitors to enjoy. NATURAL resources Plant Communities Some of the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) trees at Humboldt Redwoods are thought to be as old as 2,000 years. They are not the oldest trees on Earth — both the Sierra redwood or giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) and the bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) tree species are older. However — growing up to 370 feet in height — the coast redwoods are the tallest trees on Earth. Trillium, fairy lanterns and calypso orchids grow in profusion at their venerable feet. The lush redwood undergrowth includes several species of fern and the pink or white blossoms of ever-present redwood sorrel. Away from the redwoods, Douglas-fir, California laurel, madrone and tanoak dominate the forested areas. Prairie-like areas form grassy meadows; big-leaf maples, willows and black cottonwoods grow along the stream banks. Wildlife Tracks of black-tailed deer give away their presence in the park. Chipmunks, raccoons and skunks number among the smaller wildlife inhabitants here. On rare occasions, bobcats, coyotes and black bears leave tracks or scat along sand bars Golden eagle and river beaches. River otters play in the water. Bird watchers will also notice red-tailed hawks, wild turkeys, ospreys and golden eagles among the redwoods. All of the park’s visible wildlife are out
Humboldt Redwoods State Park P.O. Box 100, Weott, CA 95571 • Southern Humboldt County • (707) 946-2409 Humboldt Redwoods State Park is the third largest California State Park. It encompasses nearly 53,000 acres, of which more than 17,000 are old-growth coast redwoods. Preservationists have saved this unique ancient environment for the last century. OCCUPANCY: A maximum of eight people (including children) are allowed per family campsite. Picnic tables and fire rings are provided at the sites. Drinking water, flush toilets and hot pay showers are nearby. There are no sanitation stations in the park and no sites offer RV hookups. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. When pedestrians, bicyclists and children are present, even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgement. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers. CHECK-OUT TIME is 12 p.m. (noon). DOGS AND OTHER DOMESTIC ANIMALS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under control at all times. They must be confined to a vehicle, tent, or pen at night and never leave them unattended. Dogs, other 37 than those that assist persons with disabilities, are prohibited on trails. 36 BEARS: All campsites are located in bear country. It is a visitor’s responsibility to properly store food at all times. FIRES AND FIREWOOD: Please be cautious when building fires — wildfire danger is especially high during the summer. Fires are allowed only in established fire rings or camp stoves. Do not build ground fires outside the fire rings or leave campfires unattended. Do not gather firewood in the park — the nutrients must be allowed to recycle back into the ecosystem. TRASH: Please clean up after yourself so that others may enjoy the beauty of the park. 33 GENERATORS must be turned off between 8 p.m. and 10 a.m. Burlington Campground 35 39 34 43 31 29 49 27 45 23 46 21 25 24 48 51 42 30 26 Site #_______ 40 41 32 28 38 13 12 10 50 52 14 47 16 17 20 5 11 15 9 3 8 4 54 6 56 2 1 7 22 19 18 53 Avenue of the Giants 57 58 55 Discover the many states of California.TM CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2014) 153 Humboldt Redwoods State Park LEGEND Campfire Center 155 19 15 14 27 23 24 17 18 16 Site #_______ 26 28 13 11 33 32 29 30 12 Albee Creek Campground 20 21 22 25 Bull Creek Trail to Williams Grove 10 9 8 4 35 31 34 40 7 6 39 5 38 37 36 1 3 2 67 66 Albee Creek Entrance Station Hike/Bike Campsite Restrooms Showers Telephone Visitor Center Wood 97 93 92 90 91 89 1 2 Avenue of the Giants 5 7 10 8 9 For emergencies dial 911. 75 115 68 65 64 117 63 73 62 110 74 118 116 69 113 114 70 60 111 77 61 119 72 71 105 108 83 81 104 76 109 57 84 59 78 107 58 102 52 54 55 56 86 80 106 49 38 82 103 34 79 46 36 33 31 51 53 101 98 85 48 50 44 45 30 142 37 47 17 145 35 20 19 23 24 32 100 99 148 28 29 42 149 18 16 151 143 144 27 43 87 41 15 21 14 150 40 25 88 152 26 146 12 3 4 6 13 147 154 22 39 11 Hidden Springs Campground Site #_______ Trail to Williams Grove 94 96 95 134 133 132 121 135 130 137 136 131 128 138 129 140 122 123 139 141 127 126 125 124 *maps not to scale

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