by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Jedediah Smith Redwoods

State Park - California

Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park preserves old-growth redwoods along the Smith River. It is located along U.S. Route 199 approximately 9 miles (14 km) east of Crescent City. The park is named after explorer Jedediah Smith, and is one of four parks cooperatively managed as Redwood National and State Parks.

maps

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California with descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood - Visitor Map with description

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California with descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=413 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jedediah_Smith_Redwoods_State_Park Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park preserves old-growth redwoods along the Smith River. It is located along U.S. Route 199 approximately 9 miles (14 km) east of Crescent City. The park is named after explorer Jedediah Smith, and is one of four parks cooperatively managed as Redwood National and State Parks.
Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Remaining coast redwood forests grow naturally only in a narrow strip along the Pacific coastline from central California into California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 465-7335. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Redwood National and State Parks Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park 1440 Highway 199 Crescent City, CA 95531 (707) 465-7335 or 458-3496 (Information) Cover Photo by Stephen Corley. © Save The Redwoods League. © 2003 California State Parks (Rev. 2014) southern Oregon. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park protects 10,000 acres of these first-growth, primeval treasures. Park, named for an American explorer of extraordinary courage, is a feast for the eye. The park protects 10,000 acres of primeval redwood groves, a lush undergrowth of rhododendrons and azaleas, and banks of ferns against giant fallen trees. Here at the confluence of the Smith River and Mill Creek, summer temperatures range from 45 to 85 degrees, in contrast to the cool, fog-bound coast. Winter can bring 100 inches of rain and temperatures between 30 and 65 degrees; snow is rare. PARK HISTORY Before European contact, the lives of the Tolowa people, along with their neighbors the Yurok, Hupa, Karuk and Chilula, were secure and well-ordered. New settlers depleted natural resources, causing radical environmental changes and cultural conflict. European diseases to which the Tolowa had no immunity decreased their numbers, and many were sent to the reservation at what is now the Smith River. Part of the site of Camp Lincoln, built in 1862 as a buffer between the native people and the settlers, is located in the park. Tolowa descendants are still present in northern California, and many continue to practice their traditions. Who was Jedediah Smith? Jedediah Strong Smith was the first nonnative known to have traveled overland from the Mississippi River, across the Sierra Photo courtesy of jeffbright.com J edediah Smith Redwoods State The scenic Smith River Nevada to the Pacific coast. In 1821, at age 22, he came west and joined the fur-trapping party of General William Ashley. By late 1826, Smith and two partners had bought out General Ashley. Smith led his trappers across southern Utah, Nevada, Arizona, the Mojave Desert and Cajon Pass to Mission San Gabriel, where they rested for two months. When Mexican Governor José María Echeandía ordered them to leave, Smith headed north into the San Joaquin Valley. In May 1827 Smith went to Utah to recruit more trappers, but as they re-crossed the Colorado River, the formerly friendly Mojave Indians attacked, killing ten men. When Smith and his surviving men reached Mission San José, Smith was arrested and sent to Governor Echeandía in Monterey. Again ordered out of the province, the party went north through the redwoods, reaching what is now called the Smith River in June 1828. Two years later Smith and his partners sold their business and returned to St. Louis. But in 1831, Smith felt the lure of the Santa Fe Trail. While seeking water during his last wagon train west, he was killed in a Comanche ambush along the Cimarron River. Jedediah Smith’s wish was to be “the first to view a country on which the eyes of a white man had never gazed and to follow the course of rivers that run through a new land.” His reports on the geology and geography of the western territories appeared in newspapers of the day, and proved that the Sierra Nevada could be safely crossed to reach California. In a remarkably few years, his travels, observations and notes filled in many blank spaces on the country’s map. Coast Redwood Country California’s coast redwoods follow the fog and thrive in continuous belts at elevations below 2,000 feet, where heavy winter rains and moderate year-round temperatures occur. Trees can grow to 350 feet or more, with a base diameter of about 20 feet. Their root systems are broad and shallow, from only a few inches to six feet underground. The oldest coast redwoods are about 2,000 years old and show no signs of dying out. They resist insects, fire and rot to a remarkable degree, and their vigor in sprouting back when cut or badly burned is an important factor in their longevity. Plant Communities Feathery ferns, re
Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park 1111 Second Street • Crescent City, CA 95531 • (707) 458-3018 Established in 1929, this predominantly old-growth coast redwoods park is bisected by the last major free-flowing river in California, the Smith River. Almost all of the park land is watershed for the Smith River and Mill Creek, a major tributary. The park has a campground with 87 family campsites, about 20 miles of hiking and nature trails, river access, a visitor center with exhibits and a nature store. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. The campsite fee covers one vehicle. Additional fees for extra vehicles. BICYCLES are allowed on paved roadways. Riders under 18 years old MUST wear a helmet at all times, per State law. OCCUPANCY: Each campsite may have up to 8 persons (including children). GAMES/ACTIVITIES that are disruptive to the other campers or to the environment are strictly prohibited. VEHICLE PARKING: Vehicles may be parked only in your assigned campsite. They must must not extend into the roadway beyond the campsite number or limit line. Two vehicles maximum per campsite (if there is room). CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in is 2 p.m. Cabin check-in is 3 p.m. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. When pedestrians, bicyclists, and children are present, even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgment. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. GENERATORS may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. PETS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under control at all times. Except for service dogs, they are not permitted on the trails or at any interpretive programs. Dogs may not be left unattended, and they must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night. FIRES AND FIREWOOD: Fires are allowed only in established fire rings or camp stoves. Do not build ground fires outside the fire rings or leave campfires unattended. Do not gather firewood in the park––the nutrients must be allowed to recycle back into the ecosystem. You may purchase firewood from the camp hosts. TYING or nailing anything to trees is prohibited (hammocks, clothes lines, etc.). THEFT WARNING: Keep your vehicles locked and your valuables out of sight. Do not leave property out at night. Report suspicious activity to a ranger or camp host. BEARS: To ensure that you will not have a negative encounter with wildlife, please pack out all garbage and dispose of it properly.Metal bear-resistant lockers are provided for each campsite. All food, beverages, and toiletries are required by law to be stored in the provided food lockers, unless being consumed or being prepared for consumption. Name of Trail HIKING TRAILS Round Trip Mileage Boy Scout Tree Trail ............. 5.5 ................ Moderate Hatton Loop Trail .................. 0.5 ................ Moderate Hatton Trail .......................... 4 ................... Easy Hiouchi Trail ......................... 4 ................... Moderate Leiffer/Ellsworth Trail ........... 2 ................... Moderate Little Bald Hills Trail ............. 10 ................. Strenuous Mill Creek Trail ..................... 6 ................... Moderate Nickerson Ranch Trail .......... 1 ................... Moderate Simpson Reed/ .................... 1 ................... Easy Peterson Trail Stout Grove Trail .................. 0.5 ................ Easy CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting California State Parks at interp@parks.ca.gov. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park Your Site # __________ uid fl -G ed SelfRegistration (For Day Use Only) Tr ail Se To Crescent City an ll m e W Day-Use Area Smith River Na ture Trail 5 4 12 10 8 6 14 2 15 13 CH 9 7 3 1 17 25 28 16 19 106 21 23 18 27 104 20 29 22 103 31 ENTRANCE r Rive 199 h ac Be Legend Accessible Area # Accessible Campsite Boat Launch A 50 36 37 38 Campsite: Hike & Bike Campsite: Walk-in 55 56 57 58 Parking 41 49 97 96 95 National Park Visitor Center 94 93 92 91 42 44 48 43 47 45 46 59 89 87 82 83 85 88 86 84 81 60 Locked Gate 98 99 39 40 Kiosk 101 90 Picnic Area Ranger Station 102 100 Visitor Center 54 Camp Host 32 34 35 CH 53 Campfire Center A-B 51 Tr ail 52 Cabin CH B 33 80 79 77 78 76 Restroom To Grant’s Pass RV Sanitation Station Showers Winter Boat Launch Telephone Map not to scale © 2011 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) Summer Footbridge (July-September subject to river level) For Emergency, Dial 911.

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