Lake Oroville

State Recreation Area - California

Lake Oroville State Recreation Area (LOSRA) surrounds Lake Oroville, a reservoir on the Feather River. It is located in Butte County outside Oroville, California. The recreation area includes also facilities within the project area as well as the land and waters in and around the Diversion Pool and Thermalito Forebay, downstream of Oroville Dam.

maps

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento NWR Complex - Overview Map

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Recreation Map of Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Plumas - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NRW) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFW).Sacramento NWR Complex - Birding Hotspots of the Northern Sacramento Valley

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NRW) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFW).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=462 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Oroville_State_Recreation_Area Lake Oroville State Recreation Area (LOSRA) surrounds Lake Oroville, a reservoir on the Feather River. It is located in Butte County outside Oroville, California. The recreation area includes also facilities within the project area as well as the land and waters in and around the Diversion Pool and Thermalito Forebay, downstream of Oroville Dam.
Our Mission Lake Oroville State Recreation Area The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. After the springtime snow runoff, take a trip up the middle fork of the Feather River to see the spectacular 640-foot Feather Falls. When the California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 538-2219. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Lake Oroville State Recreation Area 400 Glen Drive Oroville, CA 95966 (530) 538-2219 © 2003 California State Parks (Rev. 2013) lake is high, you can boat to within a quarter-mile of the falls. L ake Oroville State Recreation Area is located on the Feather River in the chaparral-oak-pine belt of northern motherlode country. Lake Oroville, about 75 miles north of Sacramento, is the largest state reservoir in northern California. The lake’s climate varies with the seasons. Summer temperatures at the lower elevations range from 85 to 100 degrees and from 60 to 70 degrees in the evenings. It is cooler yearround at the higher elevations, with winter temperatures ranging from about 30 degrees to the mid-50s. Annual rainfall ranges from about 26 inches near the Thermalito Forebay to about 60 inches at higher elevations. Spring and fall are usually mild, with pleasant days and cooler evenings. NATIVE PEOPLE For thousands of years, this area was home to the Northwest Maidu people. A typical village might consist of a few families, or it might have 500 or more inhabitants. Often there was a “main” village with sweathouses and other common-use ceremonial buildings. The Maidu were hunters and gatherers. Acorns were their main food source, and nutritional variety came from large and small game, nuts, berries, seeds and fish from what is now the Feather River. In 1820 Captain Luis Arguello was exploring the area and named the river Río de las Plumas (River of Feathers) because the sunlight reflecting on its surface resembled floating feathers. The lives of the Maidu were disrupted after the 1848 gold discovery. When the Feather River was found to be rich in gold, entrepreneurs and gold seekers flooded into the area, taking Maidu land and establishing several small mining towns. Most towns are now under the lake. A tent city named Ophir (“gold” in Hebrew) became the present city of Oroville. The newcomers also brought diseases to which the native people had no resistance, so their numbers dwindled. Today many Maidu people live on local rancherias, including those at Oroville and Chico. Aerial view of Oroville Dam THE DAM In 1967 Lake Oroville was created by Oroville Dam, at 770 feet the nation’s tallest earthen dam. The lake conserves water distributed by the State Water Project to homes, farms and industries in the San Francisco Bay area, the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California. Oroville’s facilities provide flood control, smog-free generation of electric power and recreation. At its maximum fill level of 900 feet, the lake includes some 15,500 surface acres for recreation; 167 miles of shoreline allow boaters to land and explore the surrounding country. WILDLIFE An abundant, varied wildlife population inhabits the area of Lake Oroville. The resident species include mountain lions, raccoons, turkeys, opossums, coyotes, tree and ground squirrels, rabbits, deer, skunks, ringtails, bears and many kinds of native birds. THE VISITOR CENTER A visitor center complex atop Kelly Ridge features interpretive displays, an audio-visual room with on-request videos, and a 47-foot viewing Coyote tower overlooking the lake and dam. To reach the visitor center, continue up Oroville Dam Boulevard beyond the dam turnoff, or take Kelly Ridge Road off Olive Highway. Restrooms are located in the courtyard. RECREATION Lake Oroville offers camping, boat-in camping, floating campsites, horse camping and horseback riding, hiking, mountain biking, both sailing and power boating, waterskiing, fishing, picnicking and swimming. CAMPING Please camp only in designated areas. Reservations are recommended from late spring through Labor Day. Reserve all campsites at (800) 444-7275. Loafer Creek   —   137 sites at the Coyote Campground can accommodate tents or trailers up to 31 feet and campers or motorhomes up to 40 feet (no hookups). Drinking water and restrooms, coin-operated showers, laundry tubs and a launch ramp are One of the lake’s floating campsites nearby
(Loafer Creek Horse Camp continued) • Park only in designated parking areas within your campsite. • Do not tie horses to trees. Please clean up after your animals. • The horse warm-up area is limited to 15 minutes per horse. Horses may not be left unattended in the warm-up area. LOAFER CREEK GROUP CAMPS There are six different group campsites, and you may request one or more when making reservations: Grasshopper, Grey Squirrel, Jack Rabbit, Lizard, Manzanita Berry and Quail. RESERVATIONS: Group camps can be reserved through the CAMPING RESERVATIONS contact information at the bottom of page 1. FACILITIES: Each group camp includes five level tent sites, a large barbecue pit, picnic tables, a fire pit, a sink with running water, restroom facilities and hot showers (quarters needed). OCCUPANCY: 25 people maximum are allowed per group camp. VEHICLE PARKING: A maximum of eight vehicles are allowed per group camp. Extra vehicles may use space in the camp host or day-use parking areas. Extra vehicles will be charged a fee. Lake Oroville Visitor Center: (530) 538-2219 • 917 Kelly Ridge Road, Oroville, CA 95966 PRIMITIVE TRAIL CAMPING Three additional sites have been developed for equestrian, hikers, and bicyclists accessing the area via the Potter’s Ravine Trail. These three sites have tethering, feeding stations, and corrals near each site for two horses each. All sites have large, level tent sites. Each campsite has a picnic table and a fire ring, with a pit or vault style toilet nearby. No campfires are allowed outside of fire rings. There is no drinking water. FLOATING CAMPSITES Floating campsites are ONLY accessible by boat. NO PETS ALLOWED. FEES & RESERVATIONS: The use of floating campsites are by reservation only. This includes mooring and tying onto a floating campsite. Advanced reservations can be made through the CAMPING RESERVATIONS contact information at the bottom of page 1. Failure to show proof of payment may result in a citation and eviction. CHECK-OUT TIME is at noon. Check-in time is 4 p.m. This is strictly enforced! CAPACITY: The maximum boat mooring capacity is three vessels, each less than 24 feet in length. For mooring purposes only, two personal watercrafts will be considered one boat. The maximum load limit on board is 15 people. CAMPSITES: Each campsite has a camp table, sink, propane barbecue grill (the park provides the propane), a lockable closet, a restroom, a covered living area, an upper sun deck/sleeping area and room for tents. Bring your own drinking water. SAFETY: You must supply a U.S. Coast Guardapproved life preserver for each person on board the floating campsite. A throwable preserver is provided by State Parks and must be easily accessible at all times. A fire extinguisher is provided and must be accessible at all times. No diving or jumping from the floating campsite. SPEED LIMIT: All floating campsites are in a nowake 5 mph zone. CLEAN UP: Campers must leave the campsite clean and take their garbage with them. Check the grill to ensure the propane tank is turned off. CHILDREN must have adult supervision at all times. Report any issues to the Spillway entrance station at (530) 538-2216. FOR AN EMERGENCY, CALL 9-1-1 OR STATE PARKS DISPATCH AT 916-358-1300. © 2012 California State Parks (Rev. 2014) BOAT-IN CAMPGROUNDS Boat-in campgrounds are ONLY accessible by boat and are open year round. Check-in is at Spillway and Lime Saddle entrance stations. During low water levels, campsites may be a significant distance from the shoreline. RESERVATIONS: The following boat-in campsites are not on the CAMPING RESERVATIONS system. They are first come, first served: Campground Name # of Sites Foreman Creek 26 Bloomer Point 25 Craig Saddle 18 Bloomer Knoll 5 Goat Ranch 5 OCCUPANCY: A maximum of eight people per campsite allowed. You must be camped in a designated campground. No shoreline camping allowed. WATER & FACILITIES: No drinking water available. Campers should bring plenty of drinking water. Each campsite has a picnic table and a fire ring, with a pit or vault style toilets nearby. No campfires are allowed outside of fire rings. Lake Oroville State Recreation Area Camping Guide BLOOMER GROUP CAMP This campground offers primitive camping primarily designed for boat-in groups. The boat-in group site accommodates a maximum of 75 people and 25 watercraft. Lake Oroville offers a wide variety of outdoor activities including picnicking, hiking, sail and power boating, waterskiing, fishing, swimming, boat-in camping, floating campsites and horse camping. Lake Oroville Marinas at both Lime Saddle and Bidwell Canyon offer rental services and park stores. Lake Oroville Visitor Center has a museum, exhibits, videos and an interpretive sales area. Unless otherwise noted, guidelines apply to all camping facilities. See special guidelines for horse camping, group camping, boat-in campgrounds and floating campsites. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Use the self-registr

also available

National Parks
USFS NW