Malakoff Diggins

State Historic Park - California

Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park is a state park unit preserving the largest hydraulic mining site in California, United States. The mine pit and several Gold Rush-era buildings were listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Malakoff Diggins-North Bloomfield Historic District. The "canyon" is 7,000 feet (2,100 m) long, as much as 3,000 feet (910 m) wide, and nearly 600 feet (180 m) deep in places. Visitors can see huge cliffs carved by mighty streams of water, results of the mining technique of washing away entire mountains of gravel to wash out the gold. The park is a 26-mile (42 km) drive north-east of Nevada City, California, in the Gold Rush country.

maps

Recreation Map of Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Plumas - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the southern part of Yuba River Ranger District in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Tahoe MVUM - Yuba River South 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the southern part of Yuba River Ranger District in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=494 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malakoff_Diggins_State_Historic_Park Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park is a state park unit preserving the largest hydraulic mining site in California, United States. The mine pit and several Gold Rush-era buildings were listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Malakoff Diggins-North Bloomfield Historic District. The "canyon" is 7,000 feet (2,100 m) long, as much as 3,000 feet (910 m) wide, and nearly 600 feet (180 m) deep in places. Visitors can see huge cliffs carved by mighty streams of water, results of the mining technique of washing away entire mountains of gravel to wash out the gold. The park is a 26-mile (42 km) drive north-east of Nevada City, California, in the Gold Rush country.
Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. At Malakoff Diggins, the world’s largest hydraulic gold mine devastated the pristine landscape — leading to the first California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 265-2740. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park 23579 North Bloomfield Road Nevada City, CA 95959 (530) 265-2740 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) environmental law enacted in the nation. M alakoff Diggins State Historic Park preserves and interprets the    1850s -1880s hydraulic mining era, when gold seekers combed the Sierra foothills and washed away entire mountains looking for the precious metal. PARK HISTORY Native People The park lies within the territory of the Hill Nisenan. Nisenan territory once extended from the lower reaches of the Yuba, American, and Feather Rivers to the east bank of the Sacramento River and up to the 10,000-foot Sierra crest. The Hill Nisenan lived in multi-family villages or in extended-family hamlets. Several hamlets might be grouped together under one leader in the largest village. Villages were located below 3,000 feet elevation, in small valleys and open canyons. The families stayed in these villages during the winter, but spread to smaller camps — often at higher elevations in rough terrain— from spring through fall to collect and hunt food. The Nisenan’s first contact with the Spanish came in 1808, when General Gabriel Moraga passed through the Nisenan territory. The great malaria epidemic of 1833 wiped out many of the Nisenan. The final blow to Nisenan culture came with the 1848 gold rush, when miners overran their territory, bringing new diseases and disrupting Nisenan harvest patterns. The surviving Nisenan in the Nevada County region seek to have their federal recognition restored as they strive to preserve their ancestral heritage. Gold miners of the area methods to separate more gold from larger amounts of the deposits. These methods included long, slanted sluice boxes or “rockers.” Miners added liquid mercury (also called quicksilver), which created a gold-mercury amalgam that settled to the bottom of the devices while water, sand, and gravel ran off. Some mercury was inevitably lost from the sluice and flowed downstream with the sediments, but the miners were fairly efficient at using and re-using the valuable mercury to aid in the recovery and concentration of gold. In 1852, a French-speaking Canadian miner named Anthony Chabot bypassed the need for ditches and flumes by hooking up a canvas hose and directing the water flow at the ore supply. When his partner, Edward Mattison, increased the water pressure by adding a nozzle to the hose, hydraulic mining was born. Discarded dirt and gravel ore, called debris or slickens, was discharged into the rivers. Miners Find Gold Gold panning in Sierra streambeds quickly exhausted the readily available gold. Miners sifted through stream deposits of sand and gravel— a process called placer mining — looking for gold. Placer mining began here in 1852 after a rich gold deposit was found in Humbug Creek, near the South Yuba River. Each placer miner staked claim to a 30- by 40-foot section of ground. They would scoop and sieve gravel, dirt, and water from a running creek or river into flat-bottomed pans. They agitated these alluvial deposits, then poured off the water. The heavier gold, if present, would gleam as flakes or nuggets in the bottom of the pans. A town called Humbug soon sprang up to house the miners. They began High-pressure monitors wash gold from ancient river beds. devising more efficient In 1858, the townspeople decided to change the name from Humbug to the more attractive North Bloomfield. The surrounding area became the Bloomfield Township, which also included Lake City, the village of Malakoff, Derbec, and nearby Relief Hill. Many Chinese immigrants labored in the gold mines and grew vegetables for the town’s residents. Some miners became discouraged at the small return in gold for the amount of effort they had expended; they left to try their luck at richer pickings in Nevada. In 1866, French immigrant Julius Poquillion and others bought and consolidated many abandoned claims until they had amassed 1,535 acres. The local miners then convinced a group of San Francisco financiers to invest in large-scale hydraulic gold mini
Parque Estatal Histórico Malakoff Diggins Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. En Malakoff Diggins la mina de oro hidráulica más grande del mundo devastó el paisaje prístino, lo que conllevó California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (530) 265-2740. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park 23579 North Bloomfield Road Nevada City, CA 95959 (530) 265-2740 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) a la promulgación de la primera ley ambiental en la nación. E l parque histórico estatal Malakoff Diggins preserva e interpreta la era de la minería hidráulica de 1850   -1880, en la cual buscadores de oro rastrearon las laderas de la sierra y arrasaron montañas enteras buscando el metal precioso. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Los nativos El parque se encuentra dentro del territorio de la colina Nisenan. El territorio de Nisenan se extendía desde los puntos más bajos de los ríos Yuba, American y Feather hacia la orilla este del río Sacramento y hasta la cima de la sierra a 10,000 pies de altura. La colina Nisenan albergó villas multifamiliares o aldeas de familias extendidas. Muchas aldeas pueden agruparse bajo un líder en la villa más grande. Las villas se ubicaban por debajo de los 3,000 pies de altura en valles pequeños y cañones abiertos. Las familias se quedaban en estas villas durante el invierno, pero se extendieron hacia campos más pequeños — a menudo en elevaciones más altas en terreno accidentado — desde la primavera hasta el otoño para recolectar y cazar lo que se iban a comer. El primer contacto de los nisenan con los españoles se dio en 1808, cuando el general Gabriel Moraga cruzó el territorio de Nisenan. La gran epidemia de malaria de 1833 exterminó a muchos de los nisenan. El último golpe a la cultura nisenan vino con la fiebre del oro de 1848 cuando los mineros invadieron su territorio, lo que trajo nuevas Mineros de oro de la zona enfermedades y alteró los patrones de cosecha de los nisenan. Los nisenan sobrevivientes en la región del Condado de Nevada buscaron su reconocimiento federal mientras apuntaban a preservar su herencia ancestral. o río en ollas planas. Agitan esos depósitos aluviales y luego botan el agua. El oro más pesado, si lo hay, brilla como copos o pepitas en el fondo de las ollas. Un pueblo llamado Humbug apareció muy pronto para albergar a los mineros. Comenzaron a ver métodos más eficientes para separar más oro de cantidades más grandes de depósitos. Estos métodos incluían cajas de colado largas e inclinadas o “roqueras”. Los mineros añadían mercurio líquido (también llamado azogue), que creaba una amalgama de oro y mercurio que se asentaba en el fondo de los dispositivos mientras que corría agua, arena y gravilla. Parte del mercurio inevitablemente se perdía del colador y fluía con la corriente con los sedimentos, pero los mineros eran eficientes en el uso y reuso del valioso mercurio para ayudar en la recuperación y concentración del oro. En 1852, un minero canadiense de habla francesa llamado Anthony Chabot Los mineros encuentran el oro El lavado de oro en la rivera de la Sierra agotó el oro que estaba disponible fácilmente. Los mineros cribaban depósitos de arena y gravilla de la rivera — un proceso que se llama minería de placer  —  buscando oro. La minería de placer comenzó aquí en 1852 después de encontrar un depósito rico en oro en el Humbug Creek, cerca del río South Yuba. Cada mina de placer se reclama como un área de 30 por 40 pies de terreno. Con palas sacan y criban gravilla, tierra y agua de un arroyo Monitores de alta presión lavan el oro de riveras antiguas. superó la necesidad de zanjas y canales al colocar una batea y dirigir el flujo de agua al suministro de minerales. Cuando su compañero, Edward Mattison, aumentó la presión del agua al añadir una boquilla en la manguera, nació la minería hidráulica. La tierra y el mineral de gravilla que se descartaba, llamados detritos, se desechaban en los ríos. En 1858, las personas del pueblo decidieron cambiar el nombre de Humbug a uno más atractivo, North Bloomfield. El área de los alrededores se convirtió en el Municipio Bloomfield, que también incluía Lake City, la villa de Malakoff, Derbec y el cercano Relief Hill. Muchos inmigrantes chinos trabajaron en las minas de oro y sembr

also available

National Parks
USFS NW