Plumas-Eureka

State Park - California

Plumas-Eureka State Park is located in the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Range in Plumas County, California. The park, as a mining museum, shows and protects the history of the active mid-19th century California Gold Rush mining period. As a large natural area it shows and protects the serenity of the mountain's meadows, forests, lakes, and granite peaks. Camping, picnicking, biking, fishing, and hiking are offered.

maps

Recreation Map of Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Plumas - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Quincy in Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Plumas MVUM - Quincy 2019

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Quincy in Plumas National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nobles Emigrant Trail - Trail Map

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Recreation Map of the Lakes Basin, Sierra Buttes areas in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Tahoe - Lakes Basin, Sierra Buttes Recreation

Recreation Map of the Lakes Basin, Sierra Buttes areas in Tahoe National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Black Bears in California State Parks. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.California State Parks - Black Bears

Brochure of Black Bears in California State Parks. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=507 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumas-Eureka_State_Park Plumas-Eureka State Park is located in the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Range in Plumas County, California. The park, as a mining museum, shows and protects the history of the active mid-19th century California Gold Rush mining period. As a large natural area it shows and protects the serenity of the mountain's meadows, forests, lakes, and granite peaks. Camping, picnicking, biking, fishing, and hiking are offered.
Our Mission Plumas-Eureka State Park The mission of the California Department of Parks and Recreation is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. This unique park offers a look at the ecological wonders of the high Sierra and a glimpse of the cultural history of the California Gold Rush. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 836-2380. This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting: CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P. O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: 800-777-0369 916-653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Plumas-Eureka State Park 310 Johnsville Road Blairsden, CA 96103 (530) 836-2380 © 2008 California State Parks Printed on Recycled Paper A t Plumas-Eureka State Park, 7,447-foot Eureka Peak juts above the wooded timberline. High on the glacier-scored peaks of the Sierra Nevada, the rugged park sits at the foot of the granite formation once called “Gold Mountain.” Winter temperatures range from 20 to 40 degrees. Springtime is usually wet. Summer temperatures range from 75 degrees to the low 40s. Weather changes quickly; dress in layers. PARK HISTORY Native People For thousands of years, the Northern Maidu inhabited the Feather River region’s forested ridges, high lakes and green valleys. They settled along the edges of valleys and migrated into the mountains to hunt or gather roots and seeds during the warm seasons. Talented craftspeople, they wove coiled and twined baskets to store dried meat, seeds and ground acorns necessary for winter survival. Maidu women created exquisite beadwork, highly soughtafter for trade and adornment. The Maidu remained relatively isolated until 1851, when miners discovered gold on an exposed quartz ledge high on the slopes of Eureka Peak. Diseases, destruction of native food and plant resources and violence at the hands of European settlers rapidly reduced the native population. Many Maidu were eventually employed as laborers by white ranchers or miners. Today, Maidu descendants still follow the language, religious customs, basketry techniques and other practices of their ancestors. Gold Mining The 1848 gold discovery at John Sutter’s sawmill in Coloma brought scores of thousands of would-be prospectors to Eureka Lake California. Gold fever came to Plumas when several miners struck gold on Eureka Peak. Thirty-six miners joined together to form the Eureka Company; other small mining companies quickly formed to work the area’s rich veins. Several area townsites formed to accommodate the miners. Jamison City began as a tent city in 1853, and the more refined Johnsville was founded in 1876. Eureka Mills sprang up on Eureka Peak around the same time. As surface gold deposits diminished, smaller mining companies closed for lack of capital. In 1872 a British company purchased the Plumas Eureka mines, consolidating and further developing mining operations. A new stamp mill replaced two older mills, tunnels were enlarged, and new machinery purchased. The Plumas Eureka mines operated profitably until the 1890s, and in 1904 the British company sold them. Operations slowly tapered off, and during World War II, the U.S. government passed the War Production Board Limitation Order, effectively ending all mining operations. By then, the Mohawk Stamp Mill had processed more than $8 million in gold from the mine’s 65 miles of tunnels. A NEW WINTER SPORT In the winter, heavy snows inspired miners to organize snowshoe races. The first race took place in Plumas County in 1861—the first recorded ski competition in the western hemisphere. Snowshoes, or “longboards,” were 12-foot Norwegian-style skis that weighed as much as 20 pounds. Skiers had one long, large ski pole carried between the legs as a brake. On the straight courses, racers reached speeds of more than 80 mph. Skiing became a way of life for sport and travel. Some historians think the tramways for the Plumas Eureka Mine may have been the world’s first ski lifts. Longboard racers buildings. Ask about guided hikes, nature walks, and other activities. Fishing—Jamison Creek, which flows through the park, occasionally yields trout. Other lakes and streams in the area offer rewarding angling. Historic area PLUMAS-EUREKA TODAY The park’s historic structures testify to the area’s colorful history and the epic search for gold. The mineshafts and tunnels are sealed off. Ruins of the tramway are still visible on the hillside. The Mohawk Mill has been partially restored, and the former miners’ bunkhouse now houses the park museum and offices. NATURAL HISTORY The park’s dense forest is composed of w
American Name ofinPark B lack Bears State State Park Parks California Thanks to the following agencies for their assistance: El Dorado County U.S. Forest Service, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit California Department of Fish and Game U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tahoe Council for Wild Bears Yosemite National Park Sequoia National Park California State Parks, Sierra District: Mono Lake Tufa SNR Bodie SHP Grover Hot Springs SP Lake Valley SRA Washoe Meadows SP Emerald Bay SP DL Bliss SP Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point SP Ward Creek Unit Tahoe SRA Burton Creek SP Kings Beach SRA Donner Memorial SP Plumas Eureka SP Malakoff Diggins SHP Empire Mine SHP South Yuba River SP Photo: Janice Clark State Parks and Campgrounds in the Sierra District are situated in areas that are also black bear habitat. For more information contact: Park Office, Campground Entry Station or California State Parks Sierra District Headquarters P. O. Box 266 7360 West Lake Blvd. (Highway 89) Tahoma, CA 96142 (530) 525-7232 © 2008 California State Parks (Rev. 2010) Black bears (Ursus americanus) are an important component of California’s ecosystems and a valuable natural legacy for the people of California. The black bear is the only species of bear remaining in California and Nevada. The common name “black bear” is misleading; California black bears may be black, brown, cinnamon, even blonde. Some bears have a white patch on the chest. Bear Encounters - Never approach a bear! In the campground: Do not run. Be aggressive; assert your dominance by standing tall and making noise to scare the bear away. Loudly banging pots and pans together and shouting may work. In the woods: This is the bear’s territory; respect that and do not run. Make eye contact, but don’t stare. Pick up small children. Make yourself appear as large as possible. Stay calm and quiet—back away slowly. Black bears will usually avoid confrontation with humans. Bears will often climb a tree if frightened and usually won’t come down as long as humans or dogs are present. Strict regulations are in place to r­educe conflicts between humans and bears. There is zero tolerance for non-compliance. • Bear-resistant food storage lockers are available at all Sierra District Campgrounds. • All food and refuse must be stored in the bear-resistant lockers provided at all times—unless it is actively being used or transported. • Food-storage lockers must always be closed when not in use— whether or not food or refuse is present. • Food that cannot be stored in the provided bear-resistant lockers must be discarded. Get out of the way! If the bear attempts to get away, do not block the bear’s escape route. Report all bear encounters in state park campgrounds and picnic areas to staff at the park office or entrance station, to campground hosts or to rangers on patrol. • No food, refuse or scented items may be stored in a vehicle in the campground at any time. • Non-compliance may result in eviction from the park or other law enforcement action. Black Bears Facts Adults typically weigh 100 to Diet Bears are omnivorous; their Behavior Black bears can be active 400 pounds and measure between 4 and 6 feet from tip of nose to tail. Males are larger than females. Some adult males may weigh over 500 pounds. Wild bears may live about 25 years. teeth are designed for crushing rather than cutting food, like meat-eating carnivore teeth. Bears’ diets are based on seasonal availability of food. Black bears’ diets consist of seven food categories: grasses, berries, nuts, insects, small mammals, wood fiber, and carrion (decaying flesh). any time during the day or night. As winter approaches, bears will forage for food up to 20 hours a day to store enough fat to sustain them through hibernation. Females give birth to one to three cubs in January, during hibernation. Typically, bears have young every other year. Black bears have curved claws that allow them to climb trees. They often climb to retreat from threats, including humans. A healthy bear may run up to 30 miles per hour for short distances. Black bears are excellent swimmers; they can cross up to 1½ miles of open fresh water for food. Photo: Tammy Evans Food shortages occur in summer and fall when wild food becomes scarce. Bears get bolder and may encounter humans in their search for food. The trunk of your car and your cooler are not bear-proof! Bears may learn to associate wrappers and containers with food and can identify them by sight. They also learn to open vehicle doors. Photo: Janice Clark Black bears may scavenge in garbage cans and dumpsters; they will break into and demolish the interiors of houses, garages, cars and campers. Bears will also raid campsites and food caches, sometimes injuring people. Often these incidents result from careless human behavior. Black bears will usually try to avoid confrontation with humans. If encountered, always leave a bear a clear escape route—especially a bear with cubs. Photo: Scott

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