Santa Cruz Mission

State Historic Park - California

Mission Santa Cruz was a Spanish mission founded by the Franciscan order in present-day Santa Cruz, California. The mission was founded in 1791 and named for the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, adopting the name given to a nearby creek by the missionary priest Juan Crespi, who accompanied the explorer Gaspar de Portolá when he camped on the banks of the San Lorenzo River on October 17, 1769.

maps

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure for Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California State Parks.Santa Cruz Mission - Park Brochure

Brochure for Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California State Parks.

Brochure in español for Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California State Parks.Santa Cruz Mission - Park Brochure (español)

Brochure in español for Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California State Parks.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=548 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mission_Santa_Cruz Mission Santa Cruz was a Spanish mission founded by the Franciscan order in present-day Santa Cruz, California. The mission was founded in 1791 and named for the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, adopting the name given to a nearby creek by the missionary priest Juan Crespi, who accompanied the explorer Gaspar de Portolá when he camped on the banks of the San Lorenzo River on October 17, 1769.
Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Today the complex of buildings standing on the site of the Santa Cruz Mission is a testament to the strength of the early California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (831) 425-5849. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park 144 School Street Santa Cruz, California 95060 (831) 425-5849 © 2005 California State Parks (Rev. 2015) missionaries and the hard work of the original Indian inhabitants. N estled against the coastal hills on the northern shore of picturesque Monterey Bay lies Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park. Built twelfth in the chain of California missions, Santa Cruz Mission has only one remaining original building  —  an adobe that housed converted native families. Despite the tenacity of early Franciscan missionaries to make the mission system successful, Santa Cruz Mission residents experienced many difficulties. Their stories are interpreted here. Summers in downtown Santa Cruz can be warm with occasional fog, while the winters are cool with some rain. The weather can change quickly. Spanish Settlers Spanish missionaries learned of the coastal land surrounding Monterey Bay from early explorers. Gaspar de Portolá, in his quest to find the famed Monterey Bay, passed along the northern shore of Monterey Bay in October 1769. Misión la Exaltacion de la Santa Cruz became the twelfth of 21 missions established in Alta California. Founded on August 28, 1791, by Father Fermín Lasuén, the mission was first built near the mouth of the San Lorenzo River. The mission flooded the first winter, and Father Lasuén had to relocate to higher ground. The new location had a commanding view of the surrounding area, good climate, fertile soil and  —  from nearby Mission San José  —  native people familiar with Christianity. Construction began on the mission complex in 1793. The church and mission quadrangle, complete with grist mill, two-story granary, and workshops, were completed in 1795. The second Santa Cruz mission faced numerous challenges, earning it the nickname of “The Hard Luck Mission.” Diseases swept through the mission’s neophyte population; many ran away or rebelled at hard labor and an unfamiliar diet. The mission’s decline was further accelerated when Alta California Governor Courtesy of Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History PARK HISTORY Native People This land of abundance was home to the Ohlone Indians. Originally living in small independent tribes, neighbors often shared a similar language. The Ohlone lived in domed structures thatched with tule reeds. Groups moved seasonally to prime locations within their territories to fish, hunt, or collect plants. They ate processed acorns, seeds, berries, and roots, supplemented with meat from large and small game animals, waterfowl, and sea life. The Ohlone also pruned, harvested, and burned the grasslands to encourage fresh plant growth and to attract such small animals as deer and rabbits. Skilled artisans, the Ohlone twined and coiled baskets  —  many decorated with abalone pendants, quail plumes, and woodpecker feathers. They traded mussels, abalone shells, and salt in exchange for obsidian and other items with the Yokuts, who lived across the coastal mountains in the San Joaquin Valley. Today’s descendants of the Ohlone preserve and celebrate their heritage. Painting of Santa Cruz Mission by Edward Deakin Diego Borica established the pueblo Branciforte across the river. Although Spanish law forbade the establishment of a pueblo within a league (three miles) of a mission, Borica expected Santa Cruz Mission to support the pueblo. However, the goals and customs of the two settlements were not compatible. As the local native population declined, the padres looked to the nearby Yokuts in the San Joaquin Valley as an alternate source of converts; later the Franciscans resorted to recruiting native converts by force. Another blow to the weakened Santa Cruz Mission occurred in 1818 when French pirate Hippolyte Bouchard  —  known for plundering Primitive spinning wheel on exhibit California’s missions and communities under the Argentine flag  —  was reported off the Monterey coast. Governor Borica ordered Father Ramon Olbés to flee 30 miles north with the remaining Indians to Mission Santa Clara. Branciforte residents were ordered t
Parque Estatal Histórico Misión Santa Cruz Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Actualmente el complejo de edificios que se erigen en el sitio de la Misión de Santa Cruz constituye una evidencia California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (831) 425-5849. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park 144 School Street Santa Cruz, California 95060 (831) 425-5849 © 2005 California State Parks (Rev. 2015) de la fuerza de los antiguos misioneros y del esfuerzo de los pueblos originarios que allí habitaban. S ituado contra las colinas costeras de la costa norte de la pintoresca Bahía de Monterrey se encuentra el Parque Estatal Histórico Misión de Santa Cruz. Construida en décimo segundo lugar en la cadena de misiones, la Misión de Santa Cruz cuenta con un solo edificio original  —  una casa de adobe que albergaba a las familias nativas convertidas. A pesar de la tenacidad de los antiguos misioneros franciscanos para lograr un exitoso sistema de misiones, los residentes de la Misión de Santa Cruz experimentaron diversas dificultades. Sus historias se interpretan aquí. Los veranos en el centro de Santa Cruz pueden ser cálidos con nieblas ocasionales, mientras que los inviernos son fríos y con lluvias. El clima cambia muy rápidamente. Colonos españoles Los misioneros españoles conocieron las tierras que rodean la Bahía de Monterrey gracias a los exploradores anteriores. Gaspar de Portolá, en la búsqueda de la famosa Bahía de Monterrey pasó por su costa norte en octubre de 1769. La Misión de la Exaltación de Santa Cruz se convirtió en la misión número 21 en establecerse en Alta California. La misión se construyó originalmente cerca de la boca del río San Lorenzo y fue fundada el 28 de agosto de 1971 por el Padre Fermín Lasuén. La misión se anegó el primer invierno y el Padre Lesuén debió reubicarla en terrenos más latos. La nueva ubicación contaba con una imponente vista de los alrededores, tenía un buen clima, un suelo fértil y  —  desde la misión cercana de San José  —  los pueblos nativos se familiarizaron con la cristiandad. La construcción del complejo de la misión comenzó en el año 1793. En 1795 se completaron el cuadrilátero Cortesía del Museo de Historia Natural de Los Angeles HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Pueblos nativos Esta tierra de abundancia fue el hogar de los indios ohlone. Originalmente, los vecinos vivían en tribus independientes y a menudo compartían lenguas similares. Los ohlone habitaban en estructuras con forma de domo cubiertas con cañas de tule. Los grupos se mudaban por temporadas a las ubicaciones principales dentro de sus territorios para pescar, cazar, o recolectar plantas. Se alimentaban con bellotas, semillas, bayas y tubérculos procesados que complementaban con carne de animales pequeños y de caza mayor, aves acuáticas y animales marinos. Los ohlone talaban, cosechaban y quemaban las praderas para estimular el crecimiento de las plantas y para atraer a los animales pequeños tales como los ciervos y los conejos. Como artesanos muy habilidosos, los ohlone trenzaban y fabricaban canastas  —  muchas decoradas con colgantes de abulón, plumas de codorniz y plumas de pájaros carpinteros. Trocaban almejas, conchas de abulones y sal por vidrio volcánico y otros elementos con los yokuts, quienes habitaban cruzando las montañas costeras en el Valle de San Joaquín. Actualmente, los descendientes de los ohlone conservan y celebran su herencia. Pintura de la Misión de Santa Cruz de Edward Deakin de la iglesia y la misión con un molino harinero, un granero de dos plantas y talleres. La segunda misión de Santa Cruz experimentó diversos desafíos, lo cual le otorgó el apodo de “La Misión de la Mala Suerte”. Las enfermedades arrasaron con el pueblo neófito de la misión y muchos Rueca primitiva en exposición escaparon o se rebelaron ante las duras labores y la alimentación poco familiar. La decadencia de la misión se aceleró cuando el gobernador de Alta California, Diego Borica, estableció el pueblo Branciforte al otro lado del río. A pesar de que las leyes españolas prohibían el asentamiento de pueblos a una legua (tres millas) de distancia de la misión, Borica esperaba que la Misión de Santa Cruz mantuviese al pueblo. Sin embargo, los objetivos y las costumbres de

also available

National Parks
USFS NW