Salt Point

State Park - California

Salt Point State Park is in Sonoma County, California. The park covers 6,000 acres (2,400 ha) on the coast of Northern California, with 20 miles (32 km) of hiking trails and over 6 miles (9.7 km) of a rough rocky coast line including Salt Point which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean. The park also features the first underwater preserves in California. The constant impact of the waves forms the rocks into many different shapes. These rocks continue underwater providing a wide variety of habitats for marine organisms. The activities at Salt Point include hiking, camping, fishing, scuba diving and many others. The weather is cool with fog and cold winds even during the summer. The rocks of Salt Point are sedimentary sandstone. Due to the large amounts of sandstone, small cave-like features called tafoni can be found along the shore of Salt Point.

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Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Berryessa Snow Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=453 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_Point_State_Park Salt Point State Park is in Sonoma County, California. The park covers 6,000 acres (2,400 ha) on the coast of Northern California, with 20 miles (32 km) of hiking trails and over 6 miles (9.7 km) of a rough rocky coast line including Salt Point which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean. The park also features the first underwater preserves in California. The constant impact of the waves forms the rocks into many different shapes. These rocks continue underwater providing a wide variety of habitats for marine organisms. The activities at Salt Point include hiking, camping, fishing, scuba diving and many others. The weather is cool with fog and cold winds even during the summer. The rocks of Salt Point are sedimentary sandstone. Due to the large amounts of sandstone, small cave-like features called tafoni can be found along the shore of Salt Point.
Our Mission Salt Point State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Salt Point State Park’s wide-open meadows, thundering surf, brisk ocean breezes and stunning California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 847-3221. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Salt Point State Park 25050 Coast Highway 1 Jenner, CA 95450 (707) 847-3221 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2014) views represent Mother Nature at her best. A bout 90 miles north of San Francisco, Salt Point State Park rests majestically on one of several jutting promontories off State Highway 1. This 6,000-acre park — which includes one of California’s first underwater parks — has breathtaking views of offshore rocks, a thundering, boisterous surf and unforgettable sunsets. On California’s north coast, winters are mild and wet, with average temperatures in the low 40s. Cool and foggy summer days average about 64 degrees. Changes in weather are common and frequent. PARK HISTORY Native People The earliest known native residents — the Kashaya Pomo people — occupied an area from just north of Stewarts Point to just south of what is now the Russian River. From the coastline, their lands extended inland about 30 miles. The Kashaya Pomo are expert artisans whose exquisite basketry graces museum collections all over the world. Historians estimate that at the time of the first Spanish contact, the Kashaya Pomo numbered about 1,500 people, occupying several large villages. Summers were spent fishing along the coast; in late fall the Kashaya moved inland to hunt and to reoccupy their winter villages. Over the years, the Kashaya Pomo people have been able to preserve much of their traditional culture. Today many Kashaya descendants occupy a rancheria near Stewarts Point as well as other areas near Fort Ross. Europeans On April 8, 1846, Ernest Rufus received a Mexican land grant for 17,500 acres along the coast. The area, called Rancho German, encompassed the land from about six miles north of Fort Ross to the Gualala River. The southern portion of the rancho included what is now Salt Point Beginning in 1849, the land changed hands several times, becoming the site of several active sawmills from 1853 to 1859. Lumber was shipped on schooners to San Francisco. In 1870, the southern section of Rancho German was sold to Lewis Gerstle and Frederick Funcke to mill tanoak and other hardwoods. They built a hotel in 1872 and surveyed the westernmost section of their ranch to plot a town that Gerstle and Funcke named Louisville. NATURAL HISTORY: INLAND The inland portion of the park features acres of grasslands and forest areas. Northeast of Highway 1, coastal brush and grasslands merge with lush growths of wind-sculpted Bishop pines towering over wild calypso orchids. Mixed evergreens skirt the edges of the second-growth redwoods, descended from trees that were logged in the last two centuries. Douglas-firs stand tall among madrone, tanoak and peaceful meadows. Second-growth redwoods At about 1,000 feet elevation, a large open prairie was once home to elk. At the park’s highest point, a pygmy forest holds stands of smaller cypress, pine and redwoods. Their growth is stunted because of the area’s highly acidic, nutrient-poor soil and a hardpan layer beneath the surface. Similar groves of stunted trees can be found along the coast from Monterey County northward to Mendocino County. Among the native Marine life abounds in the waters off Salt Point. animals, coyotes and Above: bull kelp forest; right: anemone. gray foxes usually hunt at night, while bobcats are more active during the holdfast (a root-like day. Black-tailed deer, raccoons, striped skunks, structure that holds the kelp and several varieties of squirrels, chipmunks to the ocean floor), bull kelp will grow up to and field mice may be seen. Bears, mountain ten inches a day reaching for the sunlight at lions, badgers and porcupines — rarely the surface. After storms, bull kelp can be seen —  occasionally range the area. found piled in large, greenish-yellow mounds The forest, grassland and ocean shore host all over the beach. Visitors might be lucky a wide variety of birds. Look for pelicans, enough to spot a great blue heron fishing from ospreys, woodpeckers and oystercatchers. Be “rafts” of kelp at sea. In August, the water is especially wary of mi
Salt Point State Park 25050 Highway One, Jenner, CA 95450 • (707) 847-3221 Salt Point State Park encompasses one of the first underwater preserves in California. Check current regulations for fishing in the area. Fishing is restricted at Gerstle Cove Marine Reserve, where marine life is completely protected. The inland portion of the park features both grassland and forest areas. Popular activities at Salt Point State Park include camping, picnicking, fishing, diving, climbing, as well as hiking and whale watching. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Use the self-registration system if the entrance station is closed. The campsite fee covers one vehicle and one legally-towed-in vehicle. Additional fees apply for extra vehicles. OCCUPANCY: Eight persons maximum are allowed per campsite, including children. VEHICLE PARKING: Vehicles may be parked only in your assigned campsite. They must remain on the pavement and must not extend into the roadway beyond the campsite number or limit line. One primary vehicle is included in the camping fee. Please register all vehicles at the entrance station for your campsite before parking. CAMPSITES: All campsites are equipped with a picnic table and a fire ring. Fires are permitted in fire rings only. Firewood may be purchased at camp host sites. Gathering of dead wood is prohibited; it must be recycled into the soil. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in time is 2 p.m. DOGS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under adult supervision at all times. Dogs are not permitted on trails or beaches. Please clean up after your pets. Dogs must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. When pedestrians, bicyclists, and children are present, even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgment. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. NOISE: Radios and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite, regardless of the time of day or night. GENERATORS may be operated only between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. BICYCLES: Mountain bikes are permitted on fire roads from May 1 through October 31. Bicycle riders under age 18 must wear a helmet. Bicycles ridden after dark must have a light. Please ride safely. DAY USE: South Gerstle Cove also has picnic tables and a primitive toilet with no running water. While enjoying your stay at Salt Point State Park, please stay on the trails and do not disturb any plants, animals, or other natural features within the park. See www.wildlife.ca.gov before fishing and diving OCEAN SAFETY: The ocean and shoreline in the area around Salt Point State Park can be very dangerous. Please check in with park staff if you have any questions about ocean conditions. Use extreme caution when you are in or near the water. CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@park.ca.gov. Warren to Stump Beach Park Entrances Overflow Parking Gerstle Cove Campground st Gerstle Cove Marine Reserve le (No form of marine life may be taken or disturbed within these boundaries.) © 2012 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) le st Ge r Creek er Woodside Campground mi Salt Point mi 1.0 G 0.3 Trail For Emergencies Dial 911 Visitor Center Sout h il Tra int Po (No tents) 0.2 m i Salt Salt Point State Park Creek Cov e cat Wild 1 To Entrance Station 29 2 27 3 30 1 5 28 25 26 s to 0 .3 M il eC o v e G e rs tl e Campground: Hike & Bike Trail: Bike & Hike Campground: Group Trail: Hike Parking Accessible Campsite Picnic Area Accessible Feature Restrooms Entrance Station Trash Camp Host Water Faucet Campground Woods Sales # 21 19 18 16 6 7 Paved Road 22 20 17 15 W o oT o dsid e 23 4 LEGEND 24 8 12 9 s to e v Mile 0.3 stle Co Ger Map not to scale Gerstle Cove Campground 13 11 10 14 To Entrance Station 71 74 Lower Loop Campsites 31-70 31 69 32 70 33 35 34 36 to le ve Mi Co 8 tle . 0 rs Ge 65 66 63 64 62 38 39 61 58 60 78 57 59 40 37 73 77 76 67 68 72 75 44 42 45 47 43 46 48 Woodside Campground Lower & Upper Loops Upper Loop Campsites 71-109 79 82 55 84 54 56 42 80 81 53 52 50 51 49 to ile ove 1 Mt l e C s r Ge 86 88 108 107 83 104 85 102 87 100 106 105 103 90 89 109 91 92 101 94 96 99 93 95 98 97

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