Don Edwards San Francisco Bay

National Wildlife Refuge - California

Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge is located in the southern part of San Francisco Bay, California. The Refuge headquarters and visitor center is located in the Baylands district of Fremont, next to Coyote Hills Regional Park, in Alameda County. The visitor center is on Marshlands Rd, off Thornton Ave. Most of the refuge stretches along the marshy shoreline north and south of the Dumbarton Bridge, but Bair Island, in San Mateo County, is also part of the system. The southernmost extent of the refuge is in northern Santa Clara County.

maps

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Fremont

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of the Alviso section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Alviso

Map of the Alviso section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of the Iner Bair Island section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Iner Bair Island

Map of the Iner Bair Island section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.East Bay Regional Parks - Overview Map

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.

Trail Map of Ravenswood Open Space Preserve (OSP) in California. Published by the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District.Midpeninsula Regional Open Space - Ravenswood

Trail Map of Ravenswood Open Space Preserve (OSP) in California. Published by the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District.

brochures

Map of Headquarter Trails at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Headquarter Trails

Map of Headquarter Trails at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Alviso Trails at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Alviso Trails

Map of Alviso Trails at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Fishing Areas at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Fishing Areas

Map of Fishing Areas at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Birds

Birds at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Coloring Book about Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Don Edwards San Francisco Bay - Coloring Book

Coloring Book about Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Brochure about Alameda Creek Regional Trail, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.Alameda Creek - Regional Trail

Brochure about Alameda Creek Regional Trail, part of East Bay Regional Park District. Published by East Bay Regional Park District.

Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/don_edwards_san_francisco_bay/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Edwards_San_Francisco_Bay_National_Wildlife_Refuge Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge is located in the southern part of San Francisco Bay, California. The Refuge headquarters and visitor center is located in the Baylands district of Fremont, next to Coyote Hills Regional Park, in Alameda County. The visitor center is on Marshlands Rd, off Thornton Ave. Most of the refuge stretches along the marshy shoreline north and south of the Dumbarton Bridge, but Bair Island, in San Mateo County, is also part of the system. The southernmost extent of the refuge is in northern Santa Clara County.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay COYOTE HILLS REGIONAL PARK National Wildlife Refuge It is the policy of the Fish and Wildlife Service to accommodate individuals with disabilities. If you have questions concerning the trails or require the map in an alternate format, please call the Visitor Center at 510/792-0222 ext. 363. Apay Way Trail (1.38 miles) 84 0.2 mi Fishing Pier (2.5 mi.) Quarry Trail (0.1 miles) LaRiviere Marsh Trail (0.7 miles) 0.2 i m Learning Center LARIVIERE MARSH Visitor Center 0.3 mi 0.2 mi Complex Headquarters Tidelands Trail (1.8 miles) 0.4 mi Hilltop Overlook Marshlands Road N ew 0.4 ar kS 0.5 lou gh Thornton Ave. m i Harrier Spur Trail (0.1 miles) mi Visitor Center Area Trails Visitor Center Hiking Trail Refuge Boundary Information Biking Trail Road Office Accessible Walking Paths Parking Dogs On Leash Allowed on Trail Trails Restrooms Picnic Table Amphitheater To minimize disturbance to habitat and wildlife, dogs on leash are only allowed on designated Refuge trails. 0.1 Tideline Spur Trail i m (0.05 miles) 0.2 Salt Pond Salt Marsh Upland Newark Slough Trail (5 miles) mi 0 Miles 0 Kilometers 0.1 0.1 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay Visitor Center Area Trails National Wildlife Refuge Paseo Padre Pkwy. n Patterso d. R Ranch COYOTE HILLS REGIONAL PARK No Name Trail (1.25 miles) Visitor Center Refuge Boundary Boat Launch Roads Fishing Pier Trails Parking Salt Ponds Hiking Trail Salt Marsh Biking Trail Uplands 0 Miles 0 Kilometers 1 1 Shoreline Trail (4 miles) 84 d. lands R Marsh ve. nA o t n r Tho See reverse for map. SAN FRANCISCO BAY Newark Slough Trail (5 miles) Crescent Trail (0.85 miles) Fishing Pier 84
Detail Map Mapa del Area Environmental Education Center Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge 1751 Grand Blvd Alviso, CA 95002 408/262 5513 www.fws.gov/refuge/don_edwards_san_francisco_bay U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Alviso Don Edwards San Francicso Bay National Wildlife Refuge U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov For Refuge Information 1 800/344 WILD Trail Guide California Relay Service TTY 1 800/735 2929 Voice 1 800/735 2922 Visitors with disabilities may be reasonably accommodated upon request, and/or receive an alternative format publication. July 2013 The Blue Goose insignia, designed by J.N. Ding Darling, is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. These refuges are part of a nationwide system of over 550 refuges set aside for the conservation and management of fish, wildlife and plant resources for the benefit of present and future generations. California poppies © Alex Baranda AlvisoTrail_TriFold_2013.indd 1-3 In the heart of California’s high-tech industry lies a 30,000-acre oasis for millions of migratory birds and endangered species. Created in 1974, this national wildlife refuge was largely the result of community efforts to protect the San Francisco Bay ecosystem. Snowy Egret © Aric Crabb/Bay Area News Group In Alviso, you can explore a variety of the Bay’s habitats. Take a stroll through the butterfly garden, walk the boardwalk over the marsh, or hike and bike along miles of levee. The Alviso trails will provide you with unique opportunities to get out into the Bay’s wetlands and see their incredible wildlife. 6/25/2013 12:10:49 PM Alviso Area Map Mapa del Area Alviso 0 AlvisoTrail_TriFold_2013.indd 4-6 0.25 0.5 1 Miles/Milles 6/25/2013 12:11:09 PM
Dumbarton Fishing Pier Faber Marsh Coyote Creek
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Bird List Waves of migrating birds pulse through the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge during the spring and fall migrations. From tidal salt marsh to salt ponds, from seasonal vernal pools to upland habitat, the refuge offers wildlife viewing year-round. American Avocets © Greg Block Introduction A major stop on the Pacific Flyway Great Blue Heron San Francisco Bay is the largest estuary on the west coast of the United States. Its 30,000 acres of wetlands, open water, and upland habitats are home to at least 800,000 birds at any given time and to millions during peak migration. Some of these birds are permanent residents and a few come here only to breed. Most, however, use the bay as a resting and feeding stop on their long migrations. Seventy percent of the birds that migrate along the Pacific Flyway spend some time each year at San Francisco Bay. This list, which includes 234 species, includes all avian species found on refuge lands in Alameda, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties. The relative abundances in the checklist indicate how frequently you might expect to see a bird in its favored habitat. The refuge is undergoing a large wetland restoration project. The restoration, coupled with changing climates, will alter species abundance and richness over time. It is expected that this list will need revisions in the next few years. We welcome your input. Bird List Key Abbreviations and Symbols Sp - Spring, March through May S - Summer, June through August F - Fall, September through November W - Winter, December through February Abundance Symbols a - abundant - a common species which is very numerous c - common - certain to be seen in suitable habitat u - uncommon - present, but not certain to be seen o - occasional - seen only a few times during a season r - rare - known to be present, but not every year * - birds known to nest locally Threatened & Endangered Species NRefuge - species found in northern range of the refuge SRefuge - species found in southern range of the refuge Consult field guides or reference books to learn the specific habitats in which a particular species can be found. Also check with ebird.org for latest sightings. This list generally follows the A.O.S. checklist of North American Birds, 7th edition. It deviates slightly by grouping some families together that use similar habitats for easier reference. California Clapper Rail © Bill Purcell Common Name Sp S F W Common Name Waterfowl Greater White-fronted Goose r o Snow Goose r Ross’s Goose r Brant r r Cackling Goose o o *Canada Goose c c c Tundra Swan r *Gadwall c c c Eurasian Wigeon r o American Wigeon c r a *Mallard c c c Blue-winged Teal o o *Cinnamon Teal c u c *Northern Shoveler c u a *Northern Pintail c u c Green-winged Teal u r c *Canvasback c r c Redhead S Refuge r u Ring-necked Duck r r Tufted Duck r r Greater Scaup c r c *Lesser Scaup c u a Surf Scoter u c White-winged Scoter r r Black Scoter r r Long-tailed Duck r r Bufflehead c r c Common Goldeneye u u Barrow’s Goldeneye r r Hooded Merganser r o Common Merganser r r Red-breasted Merganser S Refuge u u *Ruddy Duck c u a Northern Pintails o r r r o c r c o a c o c a c c a u r r a a c r r r a c r o r c a Sp S F W *Pied-billed Grebe Horned Grebe Red-necked Grebe *Eared Grebe Western Grebe Clark’s Grebe c u c u u r r a o c c o c c o c c u r a c c Rails Black Rail *Ridgway’s Rail Virginia Rail Sora *Common Moorhen *American Coot r r u u u u u u c c r u c c u a r u u u u a *Black-necked Stilt *American Avocet c c c c a a a a Plovers Black-bellied Plover Pacific Golden-Plover *Snowy Plover Semipalmated Plover *Killdeer c r o c c u r o u c a r u c c c Whimbrel o o Long-billed Curlew c u Marbled Godwit a c Ruddy Turnstone o r Black Turnstone o r Red Knot u r Ruff r Stilt Sandpiper Sanderling u r Dunlin a r Baird’s Sandpiper r r Least Sandpiper c u Pectoral Sandpiper r r Semipalmated Sandpiper r Western Sandpiper a c u c a o o u r r u a r c o r a Grebes Stilts and Avocets u u c Sandpipers and Phalaropes u c a o o o r u a c a Sandpipers & Phalaropes continued next page Common Name Sp S F W c u a a u a u u o o r r o o u c u a c u c o a u c a a r r c a u r Sandpipers & Phalaropes continued Short-billed Dowitcher Long-billed Dowitcher Wilson’s Snipe Spotted Sandpiper Wandering Tattler Lesser Yellowlegs Willet Greater Yellowlegs Wilson’s Phalarope Red-necked Phalarope Red Phalarope Jaegers Parasitic Jaeger r Auks and Puffins Common Murre o o o a c r r r Gulls and Terns Sabine’s Gull r Bonaparte’s Gull c o c Franklin’s Gull r r r Heermann’s Gull r Mew Gull u u Ring-billed Gull c u a *Western Gull
Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge COLORING BOOK Illustrations by Kirsten Wahlquist Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge is a haven for many different animal species. California clapper rails can sometimes be seen in the marshes. They are an endangered species, meaning there are very few left. Gray foxes use underground burrows or dens found in rocks, trees, or bushes. Green sturgeon and leopard sharks are among the species caught by fishermen at the Dumbarton pier. These northern shovelers are a common sight in the wintertime, when thousands of ducks arrive at the refuge. Rare salt marsh harvest mice feed on pickleweed. They only live in the marshes around San Francisco Bay. American avocets can often be seen foraging for food along the mudflats. Barn swallows nest along the bridges and buildings in the spring, darting through the air to catch insects. Western snowy plovers raise their young along the sand and mud flats of the refuge. Western fence lizards sit out on rocks and paths, soaking up the sunshine. In the summer, harbor seals sometimes come up the sloughs to haul out and rest. Together, we can make San Francisco Bay a place for people and wildlife to share!
A Double Trail Miles long: 11/12.4 miles Year opened: 1973 Highlights: The trail is adjacent to Alameda Creek and provides access to Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation Area, Coyote Hills Regional Park, and Don Edwards S.F. Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Did you know? Shinn Pond, the first gravel pit in California, provided gravel to build the UC Berkeley stadium – 75 rail carloads for the first order! THE TRAIL TODAY Alameda Creek Regional Trail follows the banks of Alameda Creek from the mouth of Niles Canyon westward to San Francisco Bay – 11 miles in length on the southern, paved side, and 12.4 miles on the northern, unpaved side. The trail on the south bank provides access to Coyote Hills Regional Park. Making the run west from Niles Canyon along the south-side trail through an additional 3.5-mile loop trail in Coyote Hills and back again qualifies in distance for marathon runs. The trail is accessible from several roadways in the Fremont, Union City, and Newark areas. MOTOR VEHICLES ARE NOT ALLOWED ON THE TRAIL. The paved, south-side trail is suggested for bicyclists, hikers, joggers, and runners. The unpaved north-side trail is designed for horseback riding. There is no direct access to Coyote Hills Regional Park from the north-side trail. PLEASE RESPECT PRIVATE PROPERTY of households along the trail. Bicyclists under age 18 must wear an approved helmet, and all other bicyclists and all equestrians are strongly encouraged to wear a helmet. Riders should call out or sound a warning when overtaking other trail users. HISTORY The Ohlone-speaking Tuibun tribe thrived for many generations in the place now known as the Fremont Plain. Some Tuibun married nearby Causens (also known as Patlans), a tribe or single village in the present-day Sunol Valley. The arrival of the Spanish Fages expedition in POLICE, FIRE, MEDICAL EMERGENCY................9-1-1 PARK POLICE (evenings/weekends)......(510) 881-1833 ALAMEDA CREEK TRAIL OFFICE.................................. .................................. 1-888-327-2757, option 1, ext. 4501 QUARRY LAKES REGIONAL REC. AREA OFFICE ...........................1-888-888-327-2757, option 1, ext. 4552 EBRPD HEADQUARTERS..................... 1-888-327-2757 TRS RELAY FOR HEARING IMPAIRED............ 7-1-1 1772 signaled a time of great disruption for the Tuibun and their neighbors. In 1775 a Spanish survey party noted “paths everywhere crossing the [Alameda Creek] estuary, most of them heading into the mountains.” In 1776 the de Anza expedition passed through on its way to establish Mission Dolores in San Francisco, mapping the nearby Coyote Hills before they left. By 1803 and 1804 the Tuibun entered nearby Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, which was dedicated in 1797. In 1846 under Mexican governance of Alta California, a Secularization Order liquidated mission lands. Although the Spanish had promised to return these lands to Native people, by 1858 they became part of public domain, with the Tuibun and their neighbors working as laborers on large Mexican land grants, including the 17,000-acre Rancho Arroyo de la Alameda granted to Jose de Jesus Vallejo, who built a flour mill near the mouth of Niles Canyon. The mill and the importance of the canyon as a transportation route led to growth of Niles in the 1850s, after California became a state. Agriculture supported the now fast-growing population. Early roads led to landings where small ships loaded grain and other foodstuffs for transport to market. Completion of the transcontinental Central Pacific Railroad through Niles Canyon in 1869, and the Western Pacific in 1906, expanded the shipment of goods. Movie-making briefly came to the Niles District during World War I with the Essanay production studio, featuring Charlie Chaplin, Gilbert M. “Broncho Billy” Anderson, the first film-hero cowboy, and others. Quarrying for gravel began early, with gravel taken from today’s Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation Area used in the construction of the transcontinental railroad. Directly west of Quarry Lake’s entrance gate, you can see a small segment of Alameda Creek enveloped in the type of streamside vegetation that once existed along the entire watershed, Alameda County’s largest. At nearby Coyote Hills Regional Park you can participate in programs with and about area Ohlones. Phone (510) 544-3220 or visit www.ebparks.org to learn more about these programs, including an opportunity to visit a more than 2,000-year-old Tuibun village site. WELCOME! Please enjoy our Regional Parks safely, and help us protect and preserve your parklands by complying with park rules and regulations. SAFETY and ETIQUETTE • Stay on trails. Taking shortcuts can be dangerous and causes erosion. • Wading and /or swimming in undesignated areas may be dangerous and may harm the watershed. • Carry and drink plenty of water. Dehydration is a leading cause of injuries on the trail. • Be prepared for sudden changes in weather conditions. • Trails can be slippery, rocky and st

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