Sacramento

National Wildlife Refuge - California

The Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex is located in northern California, in the valley of the Sacramento River. It was created in an attempt to resolve the conflict between the needs of migrating birds using the Pacific Flyway, and those of agriculture. The refuge visitor center features a wildlife exhibit, bookstore, and Discovery Room. Visitors can enjoy a six-mile auto tour with 3 viewing areas and two walking trails.

maps

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento NWR Complex - Overview Map

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NRW) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFW).Sacramento NWR Complex - Birding Hotspots of the Northern Sacramento Valley

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NRW) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFW).

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)Berryessa Snow Mountain - Recreation Map

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)

Recreation Map of Forks of Butte Creek Recreation Area (RA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Forks of Butte Creek - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Forks of Butte Creek Recreation Area (RA) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Visitor Center, Auto Tour & Wetland Walk at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento - Visitor Center, Auto Tour & Wetland Walk

Visitor Center, Auto Tour & Wetland Walk at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Visitor Map of Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wetland Walk Trail at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento - Wetland Walk Trail

Wetland Walk Trail at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Logan Creek Trails at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento - Logan Creek Trails

Logan Creek Trails at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento - Wildlife

Wildlife at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Sandhill Cranes at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento - Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Sacramento NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/sacramento https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacramento_National_Wildlife_Refuge_Complex The Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex is located in northern California, in the valley of the Sacramento River. It was created in an attempt to resolve the conflict between the needs of migrating birds using the Pacific Flyway, and those of agriculture. The refuge visitor center features a wildlife exhibit, bookstore, and Discovery Room. Visitors can enjoy a six-mile auto tour with 3 viewing areas and two walking trails.
Visitor Center Sacramento NWR hosts the Visitor Center for the Sacramento NWR Complex, where you can enjoy our bookstore, Discovery Room, and displays. Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex 752 County Road 99W Willows, CA 95988 Phone: 530 934 2801 www.fws.gov/refuge/sacramento For further information on Refuge hunting, wildlife observation, environmental education, or photography, please use our contact information listed above. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov For Refuge Information 1 800/344-WILD Native plant garden and interpretive panels at the Visitor Center Diorama (top) and Discovery Room Wetland Walk U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, Auto Tour & Wetland Walk California Relay Service TTY 1 800/735-2929 Voice 1 800/735-2922 Visitors with disabilities may be reasonably accommodated upon request, and/or receive an alternative format publication. February 2017 Sit a while and enjoy the shade after hiking the 2-mile Wetland Walk Trail. Auto Tour Stay in your vehicle while driving the 6-mile Auto Tour, but get out and stretch at one of the 3 Park-and-Stretch areas. Take in the view at the Observation Platform. Open Year-Round Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge - Visitor Center, Auto Tour & Wetland Walk General Information: Entrance fee (pay at entrance kiosk). Area open year-round. Please respect all signs and area closures. Day use only ! Auto and trails open 1 hour before legal sunrise to 1 hour after legal sunset. ! VisitorTour Center open (Nov-Feb) 9am-4pm every day (Mar-Oct) 9am-4pm Mon-Fri closed on federal holidays Parking/Park-and-Stretch Parking is allowed only in designated areas. Three Park-and-Stretch areas (P1-P3) are designated along the Auto Tour, otherwise you must remain in your vehicle. Photography Blind - \ Blinds are available by reservation only. Visit our website for details. ! Wildlife Observation [ Visit our website to find out about educational activities and birding tours. ! Hunting - Hunting is allowed only in designated areas (not pictured on this map), © within the designated season. See our website for regulations and details. ! j ! l Fishing is prohibited. ! Í Dogs - are welcome, but must be kept on leash. ! 9 Camping is prohibited. F Hiking - Foot access on marked trails only. Follow the mowed/dirt trails. ! ! Bicycles - Bicycles permitted ONLY on Auto Tour, ONLY from May 15 - Aug 15. Stopping permitted in Park-and-Stretch areas. Bicycling is otherwise prohibited. ! · Take out what you bring in. Littering is unlawful! G Bicycles areonlyprohibited ! on Pool 2 extension. Carrying a tire repair kit is recommended. Additional maps are available for our Logan Creek Trails and for our Hunt Area. Please visit our website for details: www.fws.gov/refuge/ sacramento
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service VISITOR CENTER DIRECTIONS - Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Red Red Bluff Bluff ! . Sacramento NWR ! . YearRound Trails Los Los Molinos Molinos £ ¤ Headquarters @ and Visitor Center ! Corning Corning [ Viewing ! Platform Auto Tour ! . South Ave £ ¤ 99W £ ¤ 99 Orland Orland 32 32 Hunter Check Station *open only to hunters during waterfowl season ! . ! . Chico Chico Road 23 £ ¤ 70 § ¨ ¦ j ! Spring- Only Trails (open Feb 15 - June 30) > ! I-5 Hamilton Hamilton City City £ ¤ ! . Road 68 £ ¤ Riv er R d 191 Rd £ ¤ 99 7-mile Ln Ord ry Fe r £ ¤ £ ¤ 149 North Central Valley WMA - £ ¤ 99W I-5 § ¦ ¨ £ ¤ 162 Road 57 Road 60 Road 61 Sacramento NWR £ ¤ 45 0 Rd Z Willows Willows ! . 70 Aguas Frias Llano Seco Unit 0.5 1 £ ¤ 162 1.5 2 Miles £ ¤ 162 Driving Directions to Sacramento NWR Headquarters and Visitor Center: Road 68 Traveling ! .Gridley Gridley north or south on I-5: - exit at Road 68 (9.1 miles north of Maxwell, or 8.3 miles south of Willows) - go north on Hwy 99W (1.7 miles) - turn right into Sacramento NWR - follow signs to Visitor Parking £ ¤ 70 Gridley Colusa Hwy Delevan Rd Maxwell Maxwell 4-Mile Rd Delevan NWR ! . Maxwell Rd Butte Sink WMA Butte Sink Unit £ ¤ 20 Sacramento NWR may be seen from: - Auto Tour and Walking Trail at Visitor Center Marysville Marysville - Spring Trails on Road 68* (open ! . ! . Feb15 June 30) Yuba Yuba City City ! . 20 £ ¤ 45 Produced by Sacramento N W R C Projection: U TM Zone 10N Datum : N A D 83 Arbuckle Arbuckle 0 0 Progress Rd Ware £ ¤ Tarke Rd Colusa NWR Ohm Rd Abel Lonestar Rd ! Williams . Williams We sc o tt Colusa Colusa 5 4.5 *please be cautious when viewing from public roads...they are open to 70 public traffic,£ and may have soft shoulders. ¤ Sutter NWR Oswald 10 9 O'banion £ ¤ 113 18 Kilom eters £ ¤ 65 20 Miles Copyright:© 2014 Esri
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Wetlands Walk Trail Guide Welcome to Wetlands Walk Come explore the wonders of our wetlands along the trail that meanders through shallow marshes, along a creek, and past deep ponds! N Lo ga nC Seasonal Cycle During the fall and winter, the Refuge wetlands are flooded. Thousands of ducks and geese are on the Refuge at this time. In the spring, waterfowl migrate north as the water recedes, while shorebirds and songbirds are more common. During the summer, most wetlands are dry, therefore, resident animals are often found near permanent ponds. Viewing Tips The best times to see wildlife are in the early morning and late afternoon from November through February. To increase your chances of seeing animals, take binoculars, walk slowly, talk softly, and stay on the marked trail. Trail Tidbits It takes at least an hour to leisurely walk this two-mile trail. However, a shortcut allows you to return to the trailhead from the halfway point. Numbered posts correspond to the stops in this guide. Quiz Yourself! Pictures of the plants and animals are numbered. See how many you can identify correctly! Their names are listed on the last page of this brochure. ree k 99W 4 3 5 6 2 7 1 Shortcut Entrance Road 9 * 8 14 11 13 Start Here 12 10 I-5 Visitor Center Benches 2 * Parking Auto Tour Wetlands Walk Trailhead To begin the walk, follow the trail across the entrance road. 3 1. What Are Wetlands? 1 There are many different kinds of wetlands. Wetlands may be as small as puddles or as big as lakes, and they may contain fresh or salty water. Some wetlands contain water all year long, while others dry out in summer. The wetland you see here is a freshwater marsh. On the Wetlands Walk, you will be exploring wetlands that include seasonal marshes, permanent ponds, vernal pools, and riparian (waterside) woodlands. Each one supports unique plants and animals that have adapted to this soggy environment. 3. How Important Is This Creek? Logan Creek provides water for some of the Refuge’s marshes, through a system of canals and pipes. Along the creek grows a special forest of cottonwoods and willows — trees that like to keep their roots wet. This riparian woodland provides food and shelter for a variety of animals. Raccoons, egrets, and herons hunt for fish and crayfish at the edge of the creek. Deer, rabbits, and owls seek relief from both the hot summer sun and cold winter rains under the trees. Nesting songbirds find insects here to feed their young. 4 2 Notice the variety of plants in the seasonal marsh along the creek... 2. A Seasonal Marsh 3 4 Historically, the Sacramento River flooded in the winter and spring. The floods created vast seasonal marshes. Beginning in the late 1800s, most of the Sacramento Valley was converted to farmland. Marshes like these have been created to provide homes for animals that need wetlands. Water is drained from the marsh in late spring so a new generation of marsh plants can sprout in the warm, moist pond bottoms. In the fall, when the seed heads ripen, the marshes are reflooded to bring an abundance of food within easy reach of many birds. Follow the trail across the auto tour and to the right to explore the secluded riparian (rye-pair-ee-an) woodlands . . . 5 Look in the willow trees for nests, and along the creek banks for beaver-chewed trees. 5 4. The Duck That Nests In Trees Unlike most other ducks, wood ducks, or “woodies,” nest in holes in trees. Because so many riparian woodlands have been cut down throughout the United States, nest boxes like this one have been placed to make up for lost nesting trees. Notice the entrance of the nest box is small enough to let adult wood ducks in but keep raccoons and other predators out. However, many other animals will use the boxes, including owls, honey bees, and woodpeckers. 7 6 9 8 Look for tracks of wildlife along the creek and trail. 5. Wetlands Are Working For You Wetlands act as a living filter. Agricultural and urban runoff may enter these wetlands via Logan Creek. Marshes can absorb excess chemicals thereby helping to purify the water before it returns to the Sacramento River. Listen for lizards, pheasants, and rabbits as they scurry away to hide from you — a possible predator! 6 7 6. Smell The Marsh! During the walk, you may have noticed a faint rotten egg odor. In wetlands that are flooded for a long time, dead plants and animals collect on the bottom and rot slowly, creating a thick black muck. Special bacteria that live naturally in this waterlogged muck release a sulfur-containing gas as they break down dead plants and animals. This gas gives the marsh its characteristic, rotten egg odor. Look for floating cut cattails which are evidence of muskrats digging for roots to eat. 10 8. Permanent Or Year-Round Ponds Many plants and animals depend on permanent ponds. Dense cattails and bulrush in and around the edges
Spring and Summer Opportunities As you explore this area on foot, use binoculars and spotting scopes to bring wildlife closer into view without disturbing them. Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex 752 County Road 99W Willows, CA 95988 Phone: 530 934 2801 www.fws.gov/refuge/sacramento For further information on Refuge hunting, wildlife observation, environmental education, or photography, please use our contact information listed above. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov For Refuge Information 1 800/344-WILD Visit in early spring to catch the wildflower show. Make sure to register at the kiosk. Use the in-ground blinds to observe and photograph ducks, raptors and wading birds; chest waders are recommended for access during spring. Please replace blind lids after use...it keeps the critters out. California Relay Service TTY 1 800/735-2929 Voice 1 800/735-2922 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Logan Creek Trails: Wildlife Viewing & Photographic Opportunities Visitors with disabilities may be reasonably accommodated upon request, and/or receive an alternative format publication. February 2017 Blinds have 2 adjustable seats. Volunteers and staff work hard to keep blinds clean. Please carry out what you bring in. Open February 15 - June 30 Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge - Logan Creek Trails: Wildlife Viewing & Photographic Opportunities General Information: There are no recreation fees. Area open Feb 15 - June 30. Please respect all signs and area closures. Additional maps are available for our Visitor Visit our website to find out about educational activities and birding tours. Area and for our Hunt Photography - Blinds are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Area. Please visit our Please check in/check out on the registration sheet when arriving/leaving. website for details: www.fws.gov/refuge/ Blinds - sites #9-16 each have 2 in-ground concrete blinds that seat up to 2 people. sacramento Please replace lids after use. ! Day use only - open 1 hour before legal sunrise to 1 hour after legal sunset. [ ! ! Information/Parking ]! j Access beyond parking area is only by foot; park in designated area. \ ! ! ! Í Dogs are welcome but must be kept on leash. ! ! F Hiking - Foot access only. Follow the mowed/dirt trails for easiest access. ! ! Follow Directional Signs and guide stakes to Blinds #9 - 16. K Bicycles, horses and motorized vehicles are prohibited. È! G! ! · Take out what you bring in. Littering is unlawful! ! Be Prepared! This is a natural and wild area. You may encounter ticks, mosquitoes and wasps (especially in blinds). l Fishing is prohibited. ! Wildlife Observation - Blinds 9-16
Like small islands in a sea of agriculture, the five refuges of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex provide a lifeline to birds and other wildlife Snow geese/USFWS in the great Central Valley of California. These valued wetland areas are among the most intensively managed wildlife refuges in the United States. Mammals Beaver Big Free-tailed Bat Black Rat Black-tailed Deer Black-tailed Jackrabbit Bobcat (SR) Botta Pocket Gopher California Gray Squirrel California Ground Squirrel California Myotis California Vole Coyote Deer Mouse Desert Cottontail Gray Fox Hoary Bat House Mouse Mexican Free-tailed Bat Mink Muskrat Norway Rat Virginia Opposum Pallid Bat Porcupine (SR) Numerous small mammals like these Black-tailed Jackrabbits can be seen on the refuges. Striped Skunk/V. B. Scheffer Raccoon Red Bat Red Fox Ringtail River Otter Striped Skunk Vagrant Shrew Western Harvest Mouse Western Spotted Skunk Black Bear (SR) Mountain Lion (SR) Steven R. Emmons Raccoons 16 ©David Goeke 17
Site # Site Name Agricultural fields along Highway 45 Agricultural fields along Oroville-Chico Highway Sandhill Crane Use Areas Public Facilities _ P ! Ù ! ] ! F ! 5 ! j ! Ö ! 6 ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Contact/Ownership Information Private property Private property Private property www.fws.gov/refuge/steve_thomspon_north_central_ valley/llano_seco_unit. (530) 934-2801 ! ! Private property Private property Private property Private property ! ! ! Private property ! ! ! ! ! ! 5 Agricultural fields along Grainland Road 6 Agricultural fields along Aguas Frias Road 7 Agricultural fields along Nelson Road at Butte Creek levee 8 Agricultural fields along Butler Road 9 Ag fields along Gridley/Colusa Hwy at Cherokee Canal 10 Gray Lodge Wildlife Area 11 Agricultural fields along North Butte Road ! Agricultural fields along Road R, north of Road 39 Llano Seco Unit- Steve Thompson North Central Valley Wildlife Management Area ! ! ! 1 2 3 4 Drive-by only (no pull out) Roadside Pull Out Parking Area Auto Tour Route Info Kiosk/ Brochures Walking Trail Interpretive Trail Picnic Table Restroom Facility www.dfg.ca.gov, (530)846-7500 Private property January 2020 Visitors with disabilities may be reasonably accommodated upon request, and/or receive an alternative format publication. California Relay Service TTY 1 800/735-2929 Voice 1 800/735-2922 For Refuge Information 1 800/344-WILD U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov For further information on Refuge hunting, wildlife observation, environmental education, or photography, please use our contact information listed above. Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex 752 County Road 99W Willows, CA 95988 Phone: 530/934-2801 www.fws.gov/refuge/sacramento Northern Sacramento Valley Viewing Hotspots Sandhill Crane U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sandhill Crane Viewing Hotspots of the Northern Sacramento Valley Hamilton Hamilton City City ! H 45 £ ¤ Hwy 45 fields 1 " ) Llano Seco Unit Steve Thompson North Central Valley Wildlife Mg't Area F Ord R erry Road P Sacramento NWR Road 68 Princeton Princeton Upper Butte Basin WA Howard Slough Unit Butler Rd fields ! H Road Z Ch 2.5 5 70 £ ¤ Live Live Oak Oak Pennington Rd ! H ! H Ware Rd. 10 15 Roads State Wildlife Area Birding Site Highway Paved Interstate # ! ( 20 £ ¤ Sa cra m 45 £ ¤ 20 Miles Marysville Marysville 20 £ ¤ Moroni Rd Reststop ! H ! H Yuba Yuba City City Sutter NWR Oswald Rd Gravel Birding Route 20 £ ¤ Tarke Rd Wescott Rd. Abel Rd. Colusa NWR Ohm Rd Lonestar Rd. Husted Rd. ! H 20 £ ¤ National Wildlife Refuge " )# d Progress Rd 0 utte R Gridley Gridley Colusa Colusa eerr RRiivv ttoo eenn ° ! H Wes t Bu tte I-5 § ¦ ¨ £ ¤ 9 " ) B North Maxwell Rd. Williams Williams e rb a y al an eC e k ero Cherokee Canal " 10 ) 11 " ) N. Butte Rd fields # ! # ! 99W £ ¤ 20 A ft Oroville Oroville Rd Maxwell Maxwell Delevan NWR o ! H 162 £ ¤ Afton Rd Upper Butte Basin WA Little Dry Creek Unit Gray Lodge Wildlife Area River Rd. Four Mile Rd. 45 £ ¤ Nelson Rd fields 162 £ ¤ Gridley Colusa Hwy Delevan Rd. 99 £ ¤ Oroville WA ! H " )8 7 " ) Th e rml it Road 61 " )6 y ! H 70 £ ¤ 149 £ ¤ Aguas Frias fields Nelson Rd Butte Butte City City Road 60 Grainland Rd a Midw Road 57 191 £ ¤ Grainland Rd fields 5 " ) Upper Butte Basin WA Llano Seco Unit 162 £ ¤ ! H Willows Willows oad 4 " ) Road 39 Oroville-Chico Hwy fields Aguas Frias Rd 3 " ) Road R # ! # ! 2 " ) Durham Dayton Hwy Seven Mile Lane Road R fields Road 33 r Rd Oro ville Hw Chico y Butler Rd I-5 Rive River Rd § ¦ ¨ o Chic Chico Chico FFeeath eerr RRiivveerr 99W £ ¤ 32 £ ¤ ! H Pennington 32 £ ¤ Almond Orchard ! H Afton Blvd (Rd Y) Orland Orland Hughes Rd 99 £ ¤ Map produced by: Sacramento NWRC Projection: UTM Zone 10 Datum: NAD83 January 2020 Copyright:(c) 2014 Esri Wildlife Viewing Tips: - Respect Private Property. Do not drive or walk on privately owned areas. - Be Safe. Do not park or stop on narrow roads - avoid accidents. - Use Binoculars. - Use Blinds. Use existing vegetation or your car as a blind. Wildlife does not spook as easily by slow-moving or parked cars. - Walk Slowly and Talk Softly to observe the birds' natural behaviors. - Be a Land Steward. Do not litter or trample vegetation.

also available

National Parks
USFS NW