Anderson Marsh

State Historic Park - California

Anderson Marsh State Historic Park preserves a tule marsh, archaeological sites of the Pomo people, and historic ranch structures. It is located in Lake County, California, USA. Anderson Marsh is located at the head of Cache Creek on the southeast corner of Clear Lake, the largest natural lake completely within the borders of California. The park is between the cities of Lower Lake and Clearlake on State Route 53, north of Calistoga in the wine country.

maps

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)Berryessa Snow Mountain - Recreation Map

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Berryessa Snow Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Anderson Marsh State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Anderson Marsh - Brochure

Brochure of Anderson Marsh State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Anderson Marsh State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Anderson Marsh - Park Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Anderson Marsh State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=483 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anderson_Marsh_State_Historic_Park Anderson Marsh State Historic Park preserves a tule marsh, archaeological sites of the Pomo people, and historic ranch structures. It is located in Lake County, California, USA. Anderson Marsh is located at the head of Cache Creek on the southeast corner of Clear Lake, the largest natural lake completely within the borders of California. The park is between the cities of Lower Lake and Clearlake on State Route 53, north of Calistoga in the wine country.
Our Mission Anderson Marsh State Historic Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Four habitats — oak woodlands, freshwater marsh, riparian, and grasslands— with the wildlife they attract, sustained local native California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 279-2267. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Anderson Marsh State Historic Park Anderson Ranch Parkway off Hwy. 53 Lower Lake, CA 95457 (707) 279-2267 © 2015 California State Parks people for millennia. Anderson Marsh State Historic Park occupies the southeast corner of the oldest freshwater lake on the North American continent. The largest freshwater lake located entirely within California’s boundaries, Clear Lake has been known to yield lake sediment samples as much as a half-million years old. From late spring to early winter, the marsh is lush and green, its open waters edged by tules and other aquatic growth. Bird watching is rewarding here. Besides fishing, the lake — full of non-native crappie, bluegill, black bass, and catfish — also offers boating, camping, picnicking, and swimming. Native California Indians The area of Anderson Marsh is imprinted with the rich cultural heritage of its native peoples. Southeastern Pomo — The park and adjoining area comprise the ancestral territory of the Koi Nation of Northern California, a Southeastern Pomo tribe. The ancestral Koi were among the first humans to colonize California, arriving at least 14,000 years ago. The Koi, remarkably wealthy and prosperous traders, controlled two local sources of obsidian that were widely traded throughout Northern California. Other resources included magnesite, a beautiful adornment stone used to make highly valued stone beads. Although they did not live at the coast, the Koi also manufactured shell beads and controlled their distribution in Northern California. Clear Lake basin, with its unique fishery, provided abundant protein-rich resources for both trade and sustenance. The Koi permitted non-Pomo people access to the lake and its resources. When non-Indian immigrants first arrived in the mid-1800s, the principal Koi home base was Koi Island, now also known as Indian Island. In 1856, when the federal government forcibly moved many Pomo tribes to the Mendocino Indian Reservation, the Koi were allowed to remain on Koi Island and in the marsh, where the settlers saw the Indians as a source of cheap labor. Between 1870 and 1872, the Koi attended the Ghost Dance at their other Southeastern Pomo neighbors’ home — Elem (or Rattlesnake) Island. When they returned, the Koi found that non-Indian immigrants living on the island had taken their land, and they lost their home to these settlers. Lake Miwok — The Lake Miwok people occupied the southern basin of Clear Lake, east of Seigler Canyon Creek. They speak Ko ots a’Ataw, one of seven distinct Miwok languages. They fished at the southern basin of Clearlake, hunted, and gathered willow, tule, and pine to make baskets. Acorns were used to make bread and mush; the people traveled to the ocean to gather seaweed and shells. Traditional village structures were built with tule, pine, and gray willow. Social activities included traditional feather dancing, ball dances, races, and hand games. Today, the descendants of these peoples use many of the same natural resources their ancestors did. The abundance of resources made Anderson Marsh a gathering place for the native people. The Koi, Lake Miwok, Pomo, Wappo, and Wintun have revived and preserved their ancestral languages and cultures and continue to teach them to future generations. Everything at Anderson Marsh State Historic Park gives a glimpse of the beauty that was and still is cherished by the native people of Lake County. Lake Pomo woman in tule shelter When the State put the land up for sale in 1855, Tennessee-born J.M. Grigsby and his brother had already settled in the area. After filing a claim on the acreage, the Grigsby brothers lived there, farming and raising livestock for the next 15 years. Between 1866 and 1868, the Clear Lake Water Works Company dammed Cache Creek . In 1868 Grigsby and other residents took down the dam and restored the lands for agricultural use. In 1870 Grigsby sold his land to the Clear Lake Water Works Company. Anderson Marsh Archaeological District The presence of a number of prehistoric Koi sites was the
Nuestra Misión Parque Estatal Histórico Anderson Marsh La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. cuatro hábitats — los bosques de robles, los esteros de agua dulce, los bosques riparios y las praderas — con sus respectivas vidas silvestres han sido el sustento de los California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (707) 279-2267. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Anderson Marsh State Historic Park Anderson Ranch Parkway off Hwy. 53 Lower Lake, CA 95457 (707) 279-2267 © 2015 California State Parks pueblos nativos locales durante milenios. E l Parque Estatal Histórico Anderson Marsh ocupa la esquina sureste del lago de agua dulce más antiguo de Norteamérica. El lago de agua dulce más grande que se encuentra completamente dentro de los límites de California es Clear Lake, conocido por producir muestras de sedimentos de más de medio millón de años. Desde los últimos estadios de la primavera hasta principios del invierno, el estero es verde y exuberante y sus aguas abiertas se encuentran rodeadas por tules y otras plantas acuáticas. El avistaje de aves es un verdadero regocijo. Además de ser apto para la pesca, el lago — lleno de pomoxis no nativas, lepomis macrochirus, lubinas negras y bagres — también ofrece la posibilidad de navegar, acampar, hacer pícnics y practicar la natación. INDIOS NATIVOS CALIFORNIANOs El área de Anderson Marsh está marcada por la rica herencia cultural de sus pueblos nativos. Pomos del sureste — El parque y sus áreas aledañas forman el territorio ancestral de la nación koi del norte de California, una tribu de los pomos del sureste. Los ancestrales kois se encontraban entre los primeros humanos que colonizaron California y llegaron, por lo menos, hace 14.000 años. Los kois, notablemente ricos y prósperos comerciantes, controlaban dos fuentes locales de vidrio volcánico que eran ampliamente comercializados en toda California del norte. Otros recursos incluyen la magnesita, una hermosa piedra ornamental utilizada para hacer cuentas de gran valor. A pesar de que no vivían en la costa, los kois también fabricaban cuentas de caparazones y controlaban su distribución en el norte de California. La cuenca de Clear Lake, con su pesca única, proporcionaba abundantes recursos ricos en proteínas tanto para la comercialización como para el consumo. Los kois permitían el acceso de pueblos que no pertenecían a los pomos al lago y a sus recursos. Cuando los inmigrantes no nativos llegaron por primera vez a mediados de 1800, el principal asentamiento de los kois era la Isla Koi, actualmente conocida como Indian Island. En 1856, cuando el gobierno nacional desplazó forzosamente a varias tribus pomos hacia la Reserva Indígena Mendocino [Mendocino Indian Reservation], se les permitió a los koi permanecer en la isla y en el estero donde los colonos consideraban a los indios como mano de obra barata. Entre 1870 y 1872, los kois asistieron a la Danza de los Espíritus en el asentamiento de sus vecinos, los pomos del sureste — La isla Elem o Rattlesnake. Cuando regresaron, los kois encontraron que inmigrantes no nativos que vivían en la isla tomaron sus tierras y por causa de estos colonos perdieron sus viviendas. Los miwok del lago — Los pueblos miwok del lago ocupaban la cuenca del sur de Clear Lake, al este de Seigler Canyon Creek. Hablaban “Ko ots a’Ataw”, una de las siete lenguas distintivas de los miwoks. Pescaban en la cuenca del sur de Clear Lake, cazaban y recolectaban ramas de sauce, tule y pino para hacer cestería. Las bellotas se utilizaban para hacen pan y gachas y algunos miembros de la tribu viajaban para recolectar las algas y los caracoles del océano. Las estructuras tradicionales de la villa se construían con tule, pino y sauce ceniciento (salix cinerea). Las actividades sociales incluían danzas con plumas, bailes, carreras y juegos manuales. Actualmente, los descendientes de estos pueblos utilizan muchos de los mismos recursos naturales que sus ancestros. La abundancia de recursos hizo de Anderson Marsh un lugar de recolección para los pueblos autóctonos. Los kois, miwoks, pomos, wappos y wintun han revitalizado y preservado sus lenguas y culturas ancestrales y continúan enseñándolas a las generaciones futuras. Todo lo que se encuentra en el Parque Estatal Histórico Anderson Marsh demuestra la bell

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