Trione-Annadel

State Park - California

Trione-Annadel State Park is situated at the northern edge of Sonoma Valley and is adjacent to Spring Lake Regional Park in Santa Rosa. The rock formations of Trione-Annadel have played central role in its history: its volcanic origins, the Native American use of obsidian, the early 1900s mining of cobblestones, and modern hikers' appreciation of its volcanic rock outcrops. These lands were occupied by the Wappo and Pomo people in prehistoric times, who would have primarily inhabited the riparian zones and the marsh perimeter. Annadel includes some of the best example of undisturbed northern oak woodlands in existence. Visitors can enjoy the park's diverse wildlife and scenery during any time of the year but are perhaps most rewarded from April through June when most wildflowers are in bloom.

maps

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)Berryessa Snow Mountain - Recreation Map

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Berryessa Snow Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Trione-Annadel State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Trione-Annadel - Brochure

Brochure of Trione-Annadel State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Trione-Annadel State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Trione-Annadel - Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Trione-Annadel State Park (SP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=480 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trione-Annadel_State_Park Trione-Annadel State Park is situated at the northern edge of Sonoma Valley and is adjacent to Spring Lake Regional Park in Santa Rosa. The rock formations of Trione-Annadel have played central role in its history: its volcanic origins, the Native American use of obsidian, the early 1900s mining of cobblestones, and modern hikers' appreciation of its volcanic rock outcrops. These lands were occupied by the Wappo and Pomo people in prehistoric times, who would have primarily inhabited the riparian zones and the marsh perimeter. Annadel includes some of the best example of undisturbed northern oak woodlands in existence. Visitors can enjoy the park's diverse wildlife and scenery during any time of the year but are perhaps most rewarded from April through June when most wildflowers are in bloom.
Our Mission Annadel State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Start in a cool, shaded forest—move through mixed oak to expansive open meadows and around a refreshing 26-acre lake through tangled chaparral— California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 539-3911. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Annadel State Park 6201 Channel Drive Santa Rosa, CA 95409 (707) 539-3911 © 2003 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) then return to the deep forest coolness. A nnadel State Park sits in the historic Valley of the Moon, an area popularized by author Jack London. This largely undeveloped park is 60 miles north of San Francisco on the eastern edge of Santa Rosa. The park has more than 5,500 acres of rolling hills, seasonal streams, meadows, and woodlands free from modern intrusions. Summers are hot and dry, with temperatures reaching into the 90s and evening lows near 50 degrees. At times during the summer, coastal fog penetrates inland, providing cool evenings. Most of the area’s 30 inches of rain occur from November to April. Wintertime low temperatures can drop to the mid-20s with daytime highs in the 50s or 60s. PARK HISTORY For thousands of years, the Southern Pomo lived near what is now the park. No permanent village sites have been found in the park, but these lands were important as trading grounds and as a source of obsidian, a volcanic rock that was traded with other tribes, who would work it into scrapers, knives, arrow points, and spearheads. In the early 1800s, Russian and Aleutian fur trappers arrived in the area to establish Fort Ross, now a state historic park. They found the Pomo willing traders and hard workers. The Fort Ross settlers may have been among the Pomo’s first contact with non-native people. Gold rush miners and settlers who wanted the Pomo lands arrived after 1848, bringing disease and violence. Surviving Pomo went to nearby Mission San Francisco Solano, were forced into involuntary servitude, or were moved onto reservations. Though the Pomo resisted these drastic changes to their way of life, many succumbed to overwork and to European diseases to which they had no resistance. With the arrival of Europeans, cattle ranching and farming gradually replaced the native pattern of hunting and gathering. By 1837 this area had become part of Los Guilicos Rancho, a Mexican land grant covering about 19,000 acres. Eleven years later, the property was acquired by William Hood, who came here from his native Scotland. In the late 1800s, sheep and cattle grazing gave way to the quarrying of cobblestones. This was the major source of income for the Wymore and Hutchinson families, the area’s principal landowners, until the early 1900s. Cobblestones were used in the building of San Francisco and other west coast cities, as well as in their reconstruction after the 1906 earthquake. However, cobblestone roads were not suitable for motor vehicles, and by the 1920s, demand for them had significantly declined. In the 1930s, entrepreneur Joe Coney bought 3,200 acres of oak woodlands near Santa Rosa from Irish immigrant Samuel Hutchinson. Hutchinson had named his ranch by combining the name of his daughter, Annie, with dell (a small, secluded, wooded valley). Under the Coneys’ ownership, it became known as “the Annadel Farm.” Coney built a hunting and fishing retreat for his friends. He stocked the property with game birds and filled his man-made lake, Lake Ilsanjo (built in the mid-1950s and named for the Coney couple, Ilse and Joe), with black bass and other fish. When his fortunes began to diminish in the 1960s, Joe Coney decided to sell the ranch. California State Parks acquired Annadel in 1971, and it became a state park in 1974. Ledson Marsh NATURAL HISTORY Annadel’s terrain consists of a diverse range of plant communities, including meadows, grasslands, forests, and chaparral areas. Environmental conditions favor the development of these varied habitats, making it possible to view a wide variety of birds and animals during a visit. Deer are commonly seen around sunset, and coyotes are among the many species of wildlife here. RECREATION Hikers, equestrians, mountain bicyclists, runners, and nature-lovers can choose among more than 40 miles of trails. Elevation gains and degree of difficulty vary with each trail. Warren Richardson Trail TRAILS Warren Richardson Trail (fire road) — This trail, commemo
Nuestra Misión Parque Estatal Annadel La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Comience en un bosque fresco y con sombra— pase por los robledos hacia los extensos prados abiertos y rodee el refrescante lago de 26 acres a través del enredado California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (707) 539-3911. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Annadel State Park 6201 Channel Drive Santa Rosa, CA 95409 (707) 539-3911 © 2003 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) chaparral— por último, regrese a la frescura de la profundidad del bosque. E l Parque Estatal Annadel se ubica en el histórico Valle de la Luna (Valley of the Moon), un área popular gracias al escritor Jack London. Este parque muy agreste queda a 60 millas al norte de San Francisco en el límite este de Santa Rosa. El parque tiene más de 5500 acres de colinas onduladas, arroyos estacionales, prados y bosques libre de intromisiones modernas. Los veranos son calurosos y secos, con temperaturas que alcanzan los 90 °F (32 °C) y con mínimas cercanas a los 50 °F (10 °C), por las tardes. En ocasiones, durante el verano, la bruma costera avanza sobre el continente, lo cual causa que las tardes sean frescas. La mayor parte de las 30 pulgadas de lluvia que se reportan suceden de noviembre a abril. Las temperaturas mínimas de invierno pueden descender a un promedio de 20 °F (-7°C), con un promedio de máximas de 50-60 °F (10-16°C) durante el día. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Por miles de años, los pomos del norte vivieron cerca de lo que actualmente es el parque. No se han encontrado sitios de villas permanentes en el parque, sin embargo, estas tierras eran importantes como lugar de comercio y como fuente de obsidiana y roca volcánica que se intercambiaban con otras tribus que las usaban para hacer raspadores, cuchillos, puntas de flechas y puntas de lanzas. A principios de 1800, los cazadores de pieles rusos y aleutianos llegaron al área para establecer Fort Ross, que actualmente es un parque estatal histórico. Notaron que los pomos eran comerciantes dispuestos y muy laboriosos. Los colonos de Fort Ross deben haber sido el primer contacto de los pomos con personas no nativas. Los mineros de la fiebre del oro y los colonos que pretendían las tierras de los pomos llegaron en 1848, y con ellos violencia y enfermedades. Los pomos que sobrevivieron se trasladaron a la misión cercana de San Francisco Solano, fueron forzados a servitud involuntaria o fueron trasladados a reservas. A pesar de que los pomos se resistieron a los cambios drásticos en su modo de vida, muchos sucumbieron ante el exceso de labores y ante las enfermedades europeas para las cuales no eran inmunes. Con la llegada de los europeos, la cría de ganado y la agricultura gradualmente remplazaron los patrones nativos de caza y recolección. Para 1837, esta área se había convertido en parte del Rancho Los Guilicos, una concesión de tierras mexicanas de una extensión de 19 000 acres. Once años después, la propiedad fue adquirida por William Hood, que llegó aquí desde su Escocia natal. A fines de 1800, el pastoreo ovino y bovino le dio lugar a la extracción de adoquines. Hasta principios de 1900, este constituía la mayor fuente de ingresos de las familias Wymore y Hutchinson, los principales terratenientes de la zona. Los adoquines se usaron en la construcción de San Francisco y otras ciudades de la costa oeste, así como también en la reconstrucción luego del terremoto de 1906. Sin embargo, las carreteras de adoquines no eran adecuadas para los automotores y, para fines de 1920, su demanda disminuyó significativamente. En la década de 1930, el empresario Joe Coney le compró 3200 acres de bosques de robles cercanos a Santa Rosa a un inmigrante irlandés llamado Samuel Hutchinson. Hutchinson nombró su rancho a partir de la combinación del nombre de su hija, Annie y la palabra “dell” que, en inglés, significa pequeño valle arbolado. Bajo la propiedad de los Coney, fue conocido como la “Granja Annadel”. Coney construyó un remanso de caza y pesca para sus amigos. Aprovisionó la propiedad con aves de caza y llenó su lago artificial, el Lago Ledson Marsh Ilsanjo (hecho a mediados de 1950 y nombrado en honor a la pareja Coney, Ilse y Joe) con lubinas negras y otros peces. Cuando su fortuna comenzó a disminuir en 1960, Joe Coney decidió ven

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