Auburn

State Recreation Area - California

Auburn State Recreation Area is along 40 miles (64 km) of the North and Middle Forks of the American River. It is situated on the border of Placer and El Dorado Counties in the heart of historic Gold Country. The largest city with close proximity is the city of Auburn. Once teeming with gold mining activity, the area now offers a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities. Major recreational uses include trail running, hiking, swimming, boating, fishing, camping, mountain biking, gold panning, horseback riding, road bicycling, and off-highway motorcycle riding. Whitewater recreation is also very popular on both forks of the river, with Class II, III and IV runs. Auburn SRA is also famous for a number of endurance races that are hosted throughout the year.

maps

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Auburn - Brochure

Brochure of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Auburn - Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Hunting Map of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Auburn - Hunting Map

Hunting Map of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Campground Map of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Auburn - Campground Map

Campground Map of Auburn State Recreation Area (SRA) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=502 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auburn_State_Recreation_Area Auburn State Recreation Area is along 40 miles (64 km) of the North and Middle Forks of the American River. It is situated on the border of Placer and El Dorado Counties in the heart of historic Gold Country. The largest city with close proximity is the city of Auburn. Once teeming with gold mining activity, the area now offers a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities. Major recreational uses include trail running, hiking, swimming, boating, fishing, camping, mountain biking, gold panning, horseback riding, road bicycling, and off-highway motorcycle riding. Whitewater recreation is also very popular on both forks of the river, with Class II, III and IV runs. Auburn SRA is also famous for a number of endurance races that are hosted throughout the year.
Auburn State Recreation Area Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Deep in California’s legendary gold country, the spectacular canyons and clear waters of the American River draw hikers, equestrians, cyclists, and California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 885-4527. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Auburn State Recreation Area 501 El Dorado Street Auburn, CA 95603 (530) 885-4527 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) Printed on Recycled Paper river enthusiasts. A uburn State Recreation Area is a jewel of a park within the heart of the gold country. Once crowded with hard-living gold miners, Auburn SRA now offers something for everyone. Whether you prefer a strenuous workout on 100 miles of trails, the thrill of finding “yellow” in your gold pan, or relaxing in one of Northern California’s most beautiful landscapes, you will enjoy the wild beauty of this special place. Summer temperatures here average from high 80s to mid-90s, and winters are wet, with highs in the mid-50s and lows in the 30s and 40s. Expect rain between October and April. Auburn SRA is made up of federal project lands under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, set aside for the building of the Auburn Dam. Gold is Found In January of 1848, gold was discovered at nearby Coloma on traditional Nisenan lands. Within a few months, the foothill and mountain homelands of the native people were overrun by would-be millionaires. Europeans, Americans, and even local residents dug, panned, deluged with high-pressure hoses, dredged, and pounded the gold out of any place it might be found. Within months, mining activity on the South Fork of the American River in Coloma expanded to include the Middle and North Forks, now a part of Auburn SRA. Although early mining created extensive environmental damage, the damage has since been diminished by natural processes. PARK HISTORY Native People The Southern Maidu or “Nisenan” were the area’s predominant native group for thousands of years. The Nisenan hunted and gathered from their established villages. Their winter homes were covered in earth for insulation and dug partially underground — two to three feet deep. Summer shelters consisted of branches laid over a framework of saplings and covered with brush. The Nisenan wove baskets for trapping fish and for carrying, winnowing, and storing food. Many Nisenan baskets grace museum collections all over the world. Today’s descendants honor their ancient traditions. Mountain Quarries Railroad Bridge, circa 1930s A rich array of historic and cultural features can be seen at the park. The Mountain Quarries Railroad Bridge, an early concrete arched bridge, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Several historic bridges are still being used in remote areas. California’s highest bridge, the 730-foot Foresthill Bridge, lies within the park. The hard rock tunnels on the Middle Fork of the American River were the earliest tunnels of this type constructed in California. Whitewater rafting through one of these tunnels at Tunnel Chute provides an unparalleled experience. THE AUBURN DAM Flood control and water storage have been important issues since California’s statehood. When the Folsom Dam was built in the mid-1950s, a “companion” dam was planned for the ravines and gorges of the American River Canyon that comprise today’s Auburn SRA. In 1966 Congress authorized a dam at Auburn; construction was begun by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in 1967. In the 1970s, concerns emerged about environmental, engineering, and earthquake risks, with rising costs associated with Auburn Dam. As a result, construction was halted in the early 1980s. Although no active construction work is taking place, the Auburn Dam remains a Congressionally authorized project. As an authorized project, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has funded California State Parks’ operation of Auburn SRA. NATURAL RESOURCES Auburn State Recreation Area has richly varied natural habitats. Riparian habitat — White alders, willows, Fremont cottonwoods, and creek dogwoods line the rivers and streambanks. Chaparral and foothill woodland — South-facing upper canyon walls support chaparral — small, drought-resistant trees and shrubs. Poison oak grows in the foothill woodlands community, as well as buckeyes, interior live oaks, blue oaks, manzanita, deer brush, and toyon. Mixed
Área Estatal de Recreación Auburn Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. En la profundidad del país legendario del oro de California, los espectaculares cañones y las aguas claras del Río de los Americanos atraen California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (530) 885-4527. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Auburn State Recreation Area 501 El Dorado Street Auburn, CA 95603 (530) 885-4527 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) Printed on Recycled Paper a clientes, jinetes, ciclistas y apasionados por los ríos. E l Área Estatal de Recreación de Auburn es una joya de un parque dentro del corazón del país del oro. Una vez lleno de mineros de oro con una dura vida, el Área Estatal de Recreación de Auburn ahora ofrece algo para todos. Bien sea que prefiera un entrenamiento agotador en las 100 millas de senderos, la emoción de encontrar “amarillo” en su batea para oro, o relajarse en uno de los paisajes más hermosos del norte de California, usted disfrutará la belleza silvestre de este lugar especial. Las temperaturas del verano aquí se encuentran entre los 85 y 95 grados en promedio y los inviernos son húmedos, con temperaturas máximas por encima de los 50 grados y mínimas entre 30 y 40 grados. Entre octubre y abril se puede esperar que haya lluvia. El Área Estatal de Recreación de Auburn se compone de terrenos de proyecto federal bajo la jurisdicción de la Oficina de Recuperación de los Estados Unidos (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation), reservada para la construcción de la Presa Auburn. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Pueblos nativos Los Maidu del sur o “Nisenan” fue el grupo nativo predominante del área por miles de años. Los Nisenan cazaban y recolectaban en sus aldeas establecidas. Sus hogares de invierno estaban cubiertos de tierra para el aislamiento y estaban parcialmente bajo tierra, de dos a tres pies de profundidad. Los refugios de verano consistían en ramas colocadas sobre un marco de retoños y estaban cubiertos con matorrales. Los Nisenan tejían cestas para atrapar peces y portar, tamizar y almacenar comida. Muchas cestas de Nisenan adornan colecciones de museos de todo el mundo. Los descendientes actuales honran sus tradiciones antiguas. Una rica serie de elementos históricos y culturales se puede ver en el parque. El Puente Ferroviario de las Canteras de la Montaña (Mountain Quarries Railroad Bridge), un antiguo puente arqueado de concreto, se encuentra en la lista del Registro Nacional de Lugares Históricos. Todavía se usan muchos puentes históricos en áreas remotas. El puente más alto de California, el Puente de Forresthill (Forresthill Bridge) de 730 pies, se encuentra dentro del parque. Los túneles de roca en la bifurcación central del Río de los Americanos fueron los primeros túneles de este tipo construidos en California. El rafting en rápidos a través de uno de estos túneles en Tunnel Chute ofrece una experiencia incomparable. Se encontró oro En enero de 1848, se descubrió oro cerca, en Coloma, en tierras tradicionales de los Nisenan. En pocos meses, los hogares de los nativos en las laderas y la montaña fueron invadidos por aspirantes a millonarios. Europeos, estadounidenses e incluso residentes locales cavaron, cribaron, inundaron con mangueras de alta presión, dragaron y golpearon para sacar oro en cualquier lugar en que se pudiera encontrar. En meses, la actividad minera en la bifurcación sur del Río de los Americanos en Coloma se expandió para incluir la bifurcación norte y central, que ahora son parte del Área Estatal de Recreación de Auburn. Si bien la minería al principio provocó daños ambientales importantes, los procesos naturales han disminuido el daño Puente Ferroviario de las Canteras de la Montaña desde entonces. (Mountain Quarries Railroad Bridge), alrededor de los años treinta LA PRESA DE AUBURN El control de crecidas y el almacenamiento de agua han sido temas importantes desde la condición de estado de California. Cuando se construyó la Presa Folsom a mediados de los años cincuenta, se planificó una presa “complementaria” para los barrancos y quebradas del Cañón del Río de los Americanos que hoy conforman el Área Estatal de Recreación de Auburn. En 1966 el Congreso autorizó una presa en Auburn; la Oficina de Recuperación de los Estados Unidos comenzó la construcción en 1967.
NO HUNTING IS ALLOWED AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS: • All lands west of Highway 49; • The main body of Lake Clementine and adjacent lands within 150 yards of the lake; Auburn State Recreation Area Hunting Information • Within 150 yards of any access road, building, or campground, including Ruck-A-Chucky, Mineral Bar, and Cherokee Bar; Hunting is allowed within Auburn State Recreation Area with the following restrictions: • The Middle Fork of the American River and adjacent lands from Highway 49 Bridge upstream to the Lake Clementine Dam; • All lands west of the intersection of Old and New Auburn-Foresthill roads; and • Any private property. KEEP IN MIND: • There is no area open to sight-in weapons. • There are no areas open for target practice. For complete hunting regulations, visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/hunting. SEASON: Hunting is allowed during the regular hunting season established by the Fish and Game Commission. HOURS: Generally, hunting times are between half an hour before sunrise and half an hour after sunset except spring turkey season, where shooting hours end at 4:00 p.m. SPECIES: Deer, California quail, dove, bandtail pigeon and wild turkey METHOD: Only shotguns, rifles, and bows and arrows may be used, and only in compliance with all Fish and Game Commission regulations and licensing requirements. Except for shotguns and rifles used for hunting during the hunting season, all firearms, loaded or unloaded, are prohibited in the Auburn State Recreation Area (CCR 4313a). TRAILS: Many recreational trails run through open hunting areas. For safety purposes, please stay at least 150 yards away from recreational trails. (Continued on back page) Discover the many states of California.TM For more information, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. Auburn State Recreation Area Hunting Map 49 80 Auburn 80 nti Ro a J im Ponderosa Way ne Iow nk a Road Hill or es me Upper Lake Clementine Road F Mammoth Bar OHV Area Cle ee ke Ya La Mineral Bar Campground d Boat-In Camp Ranger Station 174 Colfax Cool thi ll Ro North Fork American River ad Drivers Flat Road Pilot Hill Shirt Tail Canyo n Sp rin Ruck-A-Chucky Campground gG 49 iger Sl Legend Ro ad a r de n Ro Yankee Jims ad Mine Yankee Jim Road Greenwood No Hunting Foresthill 193 Highway Middle Fork American River Major Road Foresthil l Road Paved Road Unpaved/Service Road Georgetown Boat-In Campground Boat Launch No hunting is allowed within 150 yards of any access road, building, or campground, including Ruck-A-Chucky, Mineral Bar, and Cherokee Bar. Campground © 2015 California State Parks 2 0 0 3 4 Miles 6 Kilometers For more information, contact: Auburn SRA, 501 El Dorado Street, Auburn, CA 95603 (530) 885-4527 Mosquito Ridge Road ad Ro
Auburn State Recreation Area Mineral Bar and Ruck-A-Chucky Campgrounds 501 El Dorado St. • Auburn, CA 95603 • (530) 885-4527 Auburn State Recreation Area is a jewel of a park in the heart of the gold country. Once crowded with hardliving gold miners, Auburn SRA now offers something for everyone. Mineral Bar and Ruck-A-Chucky are primitive campgrounds located on the American River; both are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. PARK FEES are due upon entry into the park. Self-registration is required. Fees include one vehicle and one legally towed vehicle. Extra vehicles will be charged an additional fee, with a maximum of three vehicles. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Radios and other sound-producing devices are not allowed during that time. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. OCCUPANCY: Eight people maximum are allowed per campsite. GENERATORS may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. VEHICLE PARKING: Vehicles may only be parked in your assigned campsite. They must not extend into the roadway beyond the campsite. Only two vehicles may be parked in each campsite. Additional vehicles may only be parked in the Day-Use Parking area. All vehicles must display proof of payment. No off-highway vehicle use is allowed at any time. GLASS CONTAINERS are not allowed beyond your campsite. CAMPSITES: Tents and other equipment must be confined to the space assigned and not interfere with adjacent campsites, whether or not adjacent sites are occupied. Campsites are not currently able to be reserved. We anticipate placing campsites at Mineral Bar on reservation beginning May 2019. For reservation updates, visit www.parks.ca.gov. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in time is 2 p.m. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. When pedestrians are present, even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgment. DOGS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under human control at all times. Dogs must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night. Noisy or vicious dogs are not allowed. Please clean up after your pets. PLANTS AND DRIFTWOOD: No person shall cut, mutilate, injure or destroy any tree, plant or portion thereof. Tying lines to trees may be done in a way that does not harm the tree or create a hazard. Collecting dead or downed wood is prohibited. FIRES RESTRICTIONS: Fires are only allowed in fire rings provided. Beginning July 1 (unless weather conditions require earlier), no barbecues are allowed outside the campsites. Campers must bring their own firewood. Torches are not allowed. All fireworks are strictly prohibited. LOADED FIREARMS AND HUNTING are not allowed. Possession of loaded firearms, air or spring rifles/ pistols, bows, slingshots, etc. are strictly prohibited. BICYCLE riders under age 18 must wear a helmet. Bicycles ridden after dark must have a light. Please ride safely. DAY USE offers river access, restrooms, and picnic tables. Day-use areas are open from 7 a.m. to sunset. TRASH/ FOOD STORAGE: To avoid animal contact, please take all garbage to the trash before bedtime. Mineral Bar Campground has bear-resistant boxes. All food items are to be stored in the boxes or in vehicles. CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov. to Colfax Iowa H ill Roa Historic Iowa Hill Bridge 13 5 1 2 4 Campground Overflow 3 15 16 6 14 8 7 Seasonal Closure Day-use Only 10 911. to Iowa Hill 9 11 12 Mineral Bar F or esthill Ro a d d Flat R o a 1 Locked Gate © 2018 California State Parks Maps not to scale Campsites Trail: Multi-use Accessible Feature Restrooms Campground Trail: Hike 1-30 Picnic Area Bridge Parking Short-term Only Unpaved Road 5 Boat Launch: Hand 4 Paved Road 3 2 to Day-use Area Your Site #__________ Ruck-A-Chucky to Foresthill Middle Fork American Rive r Driv ers Gate #170 (Seasonal Closure) Legend to Auburn Mineral Bar and Ruck-A-Chucky Campgrounds Auburn State Recreation Area rican River North Fork Ame For Emergencies, Dial Short-term Only d

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