Bale Grist Mill

State Historic Park - California

Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park is a California state park located in Napa County between St. Helena and Calistoga. The park is the site of a water-powered grist mill that was built in 1846 is one of only two water-driven mills remaining west of the Mississippi River.

maps

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)Berryessa Snow Mountain - Recreation Map

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Berryessa Snow Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Bale Grist Mill - Brochure

Brochure of Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Brochure (español) of Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.Bale Grist Mill - Brochure (español)

Brochure (español) of Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park (SHP) in California. Published by California Department of Parks and Recreation.

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=482 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bale_Grist_Mill_State_Historic_Park Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park is a California state park located in Napa County between St. Helena and Calistoga. The park is the site of a water-powered grist mill that was built in 1846 is one of only two water-driven mills remaining west of the Mississippi River.
Our Mission Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Families gathered at the mill to have their grain ground into flour while they socialized and caught up on the news from around California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 963-2236. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369. (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park 3315 St. Helena Highway St. Helena, CA 94574 Mail to: 3801 St. Helena Hwy. Calistoga 94515 • (707) 963-2236 © 2015 California State Parks the valley. T he Bale Grist Mill played an important role in the settlement of the Napa Valley in the mid- to late 1800s. The mill is a significant part of California history. Wheat, corn, oats, and barley were the main cash crops for farmers in the Napa Valley. Farmers brought their grain to the mill to be ground and bagged. Today, the mill is still operational, milling grains into flour and meal. The mill demonstrates its pioneering role in industrialization during the 19th century. PARK HISTORY Native People From about 6,000 BCE, the Koliholmanok (“woods people”) lived within the area now known as Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park and Bothe-Napa Valley State Park. Their tribe’s central area, now the upper Corn grinding demonstration Napa Valley, was called Mutistul. These hunter-gatherers made fine obsidian tools — knives, scrapers, arrow and spear points — as well as intricate baskets and ceremonial objects. When Spanish settlers arrived in this area of Alta California, it is believed that they called the native people guapo for their bravery, daring, and good looks; the native people eventually became known as the Wappo. Mexican land grantees and gold seekers upset the Wappo balance of life, introducing such diseases as smallpox that devastated the Wappo population. By 1855, nearly 20 years after Missouri fur trapper George C. Yount planted the area’s first grapevines, only a fraction of the Wappo people remained. Wappo descendants in Napa and Sonoma counties continue to practice and honor their ancestral traditions. Early Pioneers Edward Turner Bale was an English citizen who came to Monterey, the capital of Alta California in the 1830s. On March 21, 1839, Bale married into the prominent family of General Mariano G. Vallejo, commandant of the Mexican army. His bride, Maria Soberanes, was the niece of brothers Mariano and Salvador Vallejo. General Vallejo appointed Bale as surgeon-in-chief of the Northern Mexican army in 1840, and Bale applied for Mexican citizenship. The following year, Governor Juan B. Alvarado granted Edward Bale four leagues of land in upper Napa Valley. More than 17,000 acres in Wappo territory were given to Bale; they encompass today’s Calistoga and St. Helena. Bale’s land grant, issued in 1841, was known by various spellings and names. Perhaps referring to the Koliholmanok Dr. Edward T. Bale, ca. 1845 native people, Bale called his rancho Colofolmana; others referred to it as Caligolmana and Huilac Nama. The grant’s official recorded name (ratified in 1845) was Rancho Carne Humana, a Spanish term translating to “human flesh.” The reason for the name has been lost. The Bales built an adobe home off what is now known as Whitehall Lane in St. Helena. Edward Bale commissioned Ralph Kilburn to build a sawmill near the Napa River. Bale also had a small, animalpowered grist mill built for neighbors to grind the grains they grew. In 1843, Bale contracted to build a larger grist mill, paying the builders with portions of his rancho land or selling off parcels to pay debts. The new mill’s water came from Mill Creek, through a ditch system with a wooden flume. The water powered a 20-foot waterwheel that turned locally quarried milling stones. In 1848, Bale left to find a lucky strike in the gold fields. He returned ill the following year, and died in October of 1849. His young wife was left with six children and huge debts, liens, and mortgages against Bale’s property. In 1941 the Native Sons deeded the mill to the Napa County Historical Society, which hired caretakers to live in the granary  —  converting the interior into a Maria Soberanes Bale house. In the 1970s, California State The census of 1850 recorded Parks acquired the property and that 27-year-old widow Bale began a major restoration project had only 1,500 acres of with funding from the California unimproved la
Nuestra Misión Parque Estatal Histórico Bale Grist Mill La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Las familias se reunían en el molino para molturar sus granos y convertirlos en harina mientras que socializaban y se ponían al tanto de las novedades California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (707) 963-2236. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park 3315 St. Helena Highway St. Helena, CA 94574 Mail to: 3801 St. Helena Hwy. Calistoga 94515 • (707) 963-2236 © 2015 California State Parks de los alrededores de valle. B ale Grist Mill cumplió un papel muy importante en el asentamiento del Valle de Napa a mediados y fines de 1800. El molino es una parte muy importante de la historia de California. El trigo, el maíz y la cebada eran la principal fuente de agricultura comercial para los granjeros en el Valle de Napa. Los granjeros llevaban los granos al molino para que se moliese y envasase. Actualmente, el molino aún sigue funcionando, moliendo granos y convirtiéndolos en harina y molienda. El molino demuestra su función pionera en la industrialización durante el siglo XIX. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Los indígenas Desde aproximadamente el año 6,000 a.C., los koliholmanoks (“pueblo del bosque”) Demostración de molturación de maíz vivieron dentro del área actualmente conocida como Parque Estatal Histórico Bale Grist Mill y Parque Estatal Valle Bothe-Napa. El área central de su tribu, que ahora constituye el Valle de Napa se denominaba Mutisul. Estos cazadores y recolectores fabricaban finas herramientas de vidrio volcánico  —   como cuchillos, raspadores, flechas y puntas de lanzas. Se cree que cuando los colonos españoles llegaron al área de Alta California, llamaron “guapos” a los nativos por su valentía, audacia y agradable apariencia, y como resultado se hicieron conocidos como los wappos. Los concesionarios mexicanos de tierras y los buscadores de oro alteraron el equilibrio del estilo de vida que llevaban los wappos al introducir enfermedades como la viruela, lo cual devastó al pueblo nativo. Para 1855, casi 20 años luego de que el trampero de Missouri George C. Yount plantara los primeros viñedos del área, permanecía solo una parte del pueblo wappo. Los descendientes de los wappos en los condados de Napa y Sonoma continúan practicando y honrando sus tradiciones ancestrales. Los primeros pioneros Edward Turner Bale fue un ciudadano inglés que llegó a Monterey, la capital de Alta California, en la década de 1830. El 21 de marzo de 1839, Bale se casó con una mujer de la prominente familia del General Mariano G. Vallejo, comandante del ejército mexicano. Su esposa, María Soberanes, era la sobrina de los hermanos Mariano y Salvador Vallejo. En 1840, el General Vallejo designó a Bale como jefe cirujano del ejército mexicano del norte, y Bale solicitó la Dr. Edward T. Bale, ca. 1845 ciudadanía mexicana. Al año siguiente, el gobernador Juan B. Alvarado de concedió a Edward Bale cuatro leguas de tierra en lo alto del Valle de Napa. Más de 17,000 acres del territorio wappo fueron cedidos a Bale; actualmente comprenden Calistoga y Santa Helena. La concesión de tierra de Bale, emitida en 1841, se conoció bajo diversos nombres y grafías. Es posible que haciendo referencia a los nativos koliholmanoks, Bale haya llamado a su rancho “Colofolmana”; otros se referían a él como “Caligolmana” y “Huilac Nama”. El nombre registrado oficialmente en la concesión (ratificada en 1845) fue “Rancho Carne Humana”. La razón por la cual se lo denominó de esta manera es desconocida. Los Bale construyeron una casa de adobe en lo que actualmente se conoce como Whitehall Lane en Santa Helena. Edward Bale le encomendó a Ralph Kilburn la construcción de un aserradero cerca del río Napa. Bale también tenía un pequeño molino harinero de tracción encuentra colocada hasta hoy. a sangre construido para que los vecinos La hábil María Bale se las ingenió para pudieran moler los granos pagar las deudas de su marido y retener que cosechaban. partes de Rancho Carne Humana como En 1843, Bale encargó la herencia para sus hijos. María se volvió construcción de un molino a casar y su hija Isadora Bruck harinero de mayor tamaño y vendió el molino en 1860. le pagó a los constructores Una seguidilla de propietarios con parcelas de tierras es

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