Bidwell-Sacramento River

State Park - California

Bidwell–Sacramento River State Park preserves riparian habitat on the Sacramento River and its tributary Big Chico Creek. The park is located on the border of Butte County and Glenn County. Popular activities include fishing for salmon, steelhead and shad; and floating the river on inner tubes, canoes or kayaks. The park's riparian habitat is a good quality example of a disappearing natural resource. The river's various landscapes display great scenic beauty and constant change. The riparian plant and animal communities depend strongly on each other. Massive oaks and cottonwoods give the dense shade needed for the survival of cool-water creatures. Thick understories of elderberry, wild grape, blackberry, wild rose and numerous perennials provide shelter to a diversified wildlife population.

maps

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento NWR Complex - Overview Map

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nobles Emigrant Trail - Trail Map

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NRW) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFW).Sacramento NWR Complex - Birding Hotspots of the Northern Sacramento Valley

Map of the Fremont section of Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NRW) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFW).

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=463 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bidwell%E2%80%93Sacramento_River_State_Park Bidwell–Sacramento River State Park preserves riparian habitat on the Sacramento River and its tributary Big Chico Creek. The park is located on the border of Butte County and Glenn County. Popular activities include fishing for salmon, steelhead and shad; and floating the river on inner tubes, canoes or kayaks. The park's riparian habitat is a good quality example of a disappearing natural resource. The river's various landscapes display great scenic beauty and constant change. The riparian plant and animal communities depend strongly on each other. Massive oaks and cottonwoods give the dense shade needed for the survival of cool-water creatures. Thick understories of elderberry, wild grape, blackberry, wild rose and numerous perennials provide shelter to a diversified wildlife population.
BidwellSacramento River State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. At Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park, “cruising down the river” on rafts or inner tubes is second only to fishing for salmon, steelhead, California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 342-5185. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park 12105 River Road Chico, CA 95926 (530) 342-5185 © 2013 California State Parks stripers and shad along its tree-lined, ever-changing banks. A bout six miles west of Chico, BidwellSacramento River State Park stretches along a river whose banks are still relatively untouched by development. A classic landscape of riparian habitat, the river is lined with trees and wild vegetation. Visitors enjoy kayaking, canoeing, tubing (floating downstream on inner tubes), fishing, picnicking, hiking and watching the abundant wildlife. PARK HISTORY Native California Indians The indigenous people of this area are known today as Northwestern Maidu (including Mechoopda Maidu). For about 4,500 years, they lived in a portion of the Sacramento Valley, from west of the Sacramento River into the foothills above today’s Oroville and Chico. The oxbow lake along the river held a weir built by native people to trap fish. Today the area is called Indian Fishery. The Bidwells In 1849, John Bidwell acquired the Rancho del Arroyo Chico, a Mexican land grant that encompassed parts of today’s park. General Bidwell employed the local Mechoopda to operate his farm, orchard and ranch. Most of the Mechoopda workers, and some from other local villages, lived on the rancho. When local citizens threatened the Indians of Butte County with violence and removal, General Bidwell used a company of soldiers under his command to keep the Indians safe from hostile vigilantes. Native people due to be removed by the government also sought refuge at Rancho del Arroyo Chico. In 1868, John Bidwell married Annie Ellicott Kennedy, who became an advocate for the native people, including building them a church and encouraging their education. She eventually became a vice-president of the National Woman’s Indian Association (now the National Indian Association). John Bidwell died in Osprey 1900, leaving his widow to river. Gravel bars are used by foraging water birds, nesting killdeer, spotted sandpipers and lesser nighthawks. Endangered yellowbilled cuckoos, nesting eagles, ospreys and Swainson’s hawks prefer Fremont’s cottonwood trees and the open grassland habitats. Threatened bank swallows nest in burrows along eroded riverbanks. Valley oak woodlands shelter owls, woodpeckers and bluebirds. Along shaded banks, juvenile salmon, beavers and river otters hide. Blue grosbeaks build nests in willow scrub. Water birds feed in the wetland areas, while sloughs and side channels provide shelter for nesting egrets and herons, as well as basking western pond turtles. Indian Fishery Nature Trail oversee the rancho. In 1908, Annie Bidwell deeded several small portions of land along the Sacramento River to the State to preserve the trees on its banks, to prevent the diversion of water for private purposes, and to maintain the natural beauty of the river’s feeder streams. Before her death, Mrs. Bidwell provided for the rancho’s village residents by placing the land into trust for their occupation. NATURAL HISTORY Flora and Fauna Willow and white alder stand among other native riparian trees. Button bush and wild blackberry hug the edges of the meandering Day Use River Access Points Four unconnected subunits make up the park: Irvine Finch River Access, Pine Creek Landing, Indian Fishery and Big Chico Creek. Irvine Finch River Access —This 5.2-acre west bank section has a boat launch, picnic tables, restrooms, and en-route camping. Fishing is good here. See www.dfg.ca.gov for licensing regulations. Pine Creek Landing —Near the boat launch ramp on Pine Creek, 4.8 acres of riverside park have boating, picnicking, fishing and wildlife watching. Indian Fishery — This 100-acre subunit has a picnic area, nature viewing, hiking trails and fishing. Big Chico Creek — At Big Chico Creek, 96 acres have trails that are ideal for bank fishing, nature viewing, sunbathing and handcarried boat launching. Photo courtesy of Kurt Geiger Western pond turtle Accessible Features Sacr

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