"Fort Ord National Monument" by Bureau of Land Management California , public domain

Fort Ord

National Monument - California

Fort Ord is a former United States Army post on Monterey Bay of the Pacific Ocean coast in California, which closed in 1994.

maps

Visitor Map of Ford Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Fort Ord - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Ford Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Trails Map of Ford Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Fort Ord - Trail System

Trails Map of Ford Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Brochure of Fort Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Fort Ord - Brochure

Brochure of Fort Ord National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM California - Freshwater Fishing

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Fort Ord NM https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/california/fort-ord-national-monument https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Ord Fort Ord is a former United States Army post on Monterey Bay of the Pacific Ocean coast in California, which closed in 1994.
BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL ADMINISTRATIVE RD 96 TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Fort Ord Trails Are Shared Access The BLM manages the Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that protects natural values, honors the military and cultural heritage of the landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages In an Emergency • Call 9-1-1 • There are five fire stations near the National Monument that are shown on the trail map • The Monterey County Regional Fire District assists with EMS from stations near State Route 68 and another near Reservation Road • Presidio of Monterey Fire Department is located on General Jim Moore Boulevard Military Heritage Fort Ord is cherished for its link to the heroism and dedication of the men and women who served our nation and fought in the major conflicts of the 20th its role as a U.S. Army facility from 1917–1994. under BLM administration following the completion century. This area remains undeveloped thanks to 7,200 acres and an additional 7,450 acres will come of appropriate environmental remediation by the U.S. Army. Fort Ord’s origins date back to 1917, when the U.S. Army purchased land near the Monterey Bay Fort Ord is loved for its beauty and rich biodiversity—including one of the largest remaining expanses of maritime chaparral composed of shrubs like manzanitas, wild lilac and chamise that supports numerous plant and animal species. • Keep to open, signed roads and trails. Some trails can be heavily used. Please be considerate of other visitors! • Obey all Danger/No Trespassing signs and barricades. Do not touch items that might be discarded military munitions. YIELD TO For Your Enjoyment to use as a training ground for field artillery and cavalry troops stationed at the nearby Presidio of Monterey. The area was named Camp Ord after Major General Edward O.C. Ord—a distinguished Civil War veteran. Through the 1930s, Fort Ord’s primary purpose was cavalry training. In 1940, Camp Ord was re-designated Fort Ord with the 7th Infantry Division occupying the post. For the next 30 years, Fort Ord served as the primary facility for basic training in the U.S. Army. In its heyday, Fort Ord covered more than 28,000 acres and, at one time, was home to 50,000 troops. During the Vietnam War, it served as a leading training center and deployment staging ground. In total, as many as 1.5 million American troops trained at Fort Ord. In 1991, Fort Ord was selected for decommissioning and the post formally closed in 1994. U.S. Army Photo BLM/CA-GI-2012-016+6240+REV2020 Trail Map & Guide Subscribe to News.bytes, our weekly e-newsletter www.blm.gov/california Bureau of Land Management 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933 (831) 582-2200 www.blm.gov/fort-ord Contact Us CLOSED TRAIL ADMINISTRATIVE RD 96 TRAIL Closed Trails—undergoing restoration. Unsigned trails are closed trails too. Administrative Roads—most are graveled; a few are paved. More durable for wet use. These are open for public non-motorized use. Single Track—popular for hikers and bikers. Watch your speed and avoid when wet. Know The Signs • Control and clean up after all dogs. Please observe posted leash restrictions. • Campfires and fireworks are prohibited. • Fort Ord is open from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. • Shooting, hunting and possession of weapons is prohibited. National Monument • Motorized use (vehicles, motorcycles, etc.) is prohibited. Fort Ord Trails Are Shared Access The BLM manages the Fort Ord National Monument in a manner that protects natural values, honors the military and cultural heritage of the landscape and offers high-quality, outdoor recreation opportunities. This expansive landscape near the Monterey Bay provides 86 miles of rugged trails. The monument covers approximately 14,650 acres and is jointly administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Army. The BLM currently manages
Bag limits, seasons of use, and size restriction of fish can be found on the same web site. Fisherman and Fire Wildfire can be both beneficial and devastating. It can wipe out homes and businesses as well as rejuvenate forested lands and riparian areas. It is always best to leave fire to the professionals and always make sure your campfires and burning items are completely out before you leave. Please remember to be very careful with fire. fishing accidents. Always be sure of your footing when walking or wading (and it is generally better for you and the aquatic species to stay out of the streams and rivers while fishing). Large and small wildlife (snakes and mosquitos) can Nutria be an annoyance when fishing. Be aware of your surroundings and watch where you step. Wear mosquito and bug repellant with deet to keep them from eating you alive. As always, be careful when driving to and from your secret fishing hole. When boating, always have a Quagga Mussels life vest handy (and kids under 15 must always wear a vest while in a boat per California State Law). Mother Lode Field Office (916) 941-3101 5152 Hillsdale Circle El Dorado Hills, CA 95762-5713 (El Dorado Co.) freshwater/license-information. fishermen and women are injured or lose their lives in Applegate Field Office (530) 233-4666 708 W. 12th Street Alturas, CA 96101-3130 (Modoc Co.) at http://www.eregulations.com/california/fishing/ opportunity, it can be dangerous as well. Every year, Surprise Field Station (530) 279-6101 602 Cressler St. phy./ P.O. Box 460 mlg. Cedarville, CA 96104-0460 (Modoc Co.) California. A listing of those requirements may be found Eurasian Milfoil Palm Springs Field Office (760) 833-7100 1201 Bird Center Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262-8001 (Riverside Co.) Freshwater Fishing license issued by the State of Hyacinth Needles Field Office (760) 326-7000 1303 So. Hwy. 95 Needles, CA 92363-4217 (San Bernardino Co.) Even though fishing is a tremendous recreational license, you are required to possess a California Arcata Field Office (707) 825-2300 1695 Heindon Road Arcata, CA 95521-4573 (Humboldt Co.) While you are not required to have a “BLM” fishing Aquatic Invasive Species include Bakersfield Field Office (661) 391-6000 3801 Pegasus Drive Bakersfield, CA 933086837 (Kern Co.) Safety Barstow Field Office (760) 252-6000 2601 Barstow Road Barstow, CA 92311-6653 (San Bernardino Co.) License Requirement water to another. Redding Field Office (530) 224-2100 6640 Lockheed Drive Redding, CA 96002 (Shasta Co.) Never release plants, animals, or fish into water bodies. Never move fish or plants or bait from one Bishop Field Office (760) 872-5000 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100 Bishop, CA 93514-3101 (Inyo Co.) Dry – Completely dry equipment and gear between visits to fresh water systems. Ridgecrest Field Office (760) 384-5400 300 So. Richmond Road Ridgecrest, CA 93555-4436 (Kern Co.) Drain – Empty coolers, bilge pumps, and buckets of all water before leaving a water body. Central Coast Office (831) 582-2200 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933-6009 (San Benito Co.) Clean – Rinse and remove all mud and plant materials from boats, fishing equipment, and clothing. Ukiah Field Office (707) 468-4000 2550 N. State Street Ukiah, CA 95482-5194 (Mendocino Co.) serious and irreversible harm to aquatic habitats in California if allowed to spread unchecked. Eagle Lake Field Office (530) 257-0456 2550 Riverside Drive Susanville, CA 96130-4710 (Lassen Co.) Take measures to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive plants and animals. They can cause El Centro Field Office (760) 337-4400 1661 So. 4th Street El Centro, CA 92243-4561 (Imperial Co.) Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species f you have any questions, feel free to contact ny of the following BLM offices in California: uestions? Catch and Release A large percent of California freshwater anglers are catch and release fishermen — meaning they are very careful with the fish after they catch them and they release them back to the water as quickly as possible. It is always a good thing to keep your fish in a “fish friendly” net in the water until you are ready to release it. Barbless hooks Leave No Trace How to photograph your catch Take only pictures and leave artifacts where you find them. The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 makes removal of cultural resources punishable by fines and jail time. When it’s a catch and release fish species or regulation, that creates a challenge for getting a photo of your prize catch. Remember if you’re in a catch and release scenario keep the fish in the water at all times and take the photo of you also harm fish less that barbed ones. The use of live bait holding the fish in the water. is also a detriment to catch and release fishing. Please If it’s a not catch and release and it’s a keeper then you remember, the fish you catch and release today may be can have it out of the water. the fish yo

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