"Headwaters Forest Reserve" by Bureau of Land Management California , mark/1.0

Headwaters

Forest Reserve - California

The Headwaters Forest Reserve is a group of old growth coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) groves, comprising about 7,472 acres (30.24 km2). The Reserve was established in 1999 after a decade-long grassroots effort to protect the world’s last unprotected, intact, old-growth redwood forest ecosystem. Several threatened species call the Reserve home, including coho salmon, the northern spotted owl, and the marbled murrelet. Deep in the heart of the Headwaters, old-growth forest is the beginnings or headwaters of the South Fork Elk River and Salmon Creek. This is how the area got its name.

maps

Visitor Map of Headwaters Forest Reserve in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Headwaters - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Headwaters Forest Reserve in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Common Plants at Headwaters Forest Reserve (FR) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Headwaters - Common Plants

Common Plants at Headwaters Forest Reserve (FR) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM California - Freshwater Fishing

Brochure for Freshwater Fishing in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Headwaters FR https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/california/headwaters-forest-reserve https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headwaters_Forest_Reserve The Headwaters Forest Reserve is a group of old growth coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) groves, comprising about 7,472 acres (30.24 km2). The Reserve was established in 1999 after a decade-long grassroots effort to protect the world’s last unprotected, intact, old-growth redwood forest ecosystem. Several threatened species call the Reserve home, including coho salmon, the northern spotted owl, and the marbled murrelet. Deep in the heart of the Headwaters, old-growth forest is the beginnings or headwaters of the South Fork Elk River and Salmon Creek. This is how the area got its name.
Trees Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii Over 250 feet, evergreen, coniferous forests. Look for: Cones (pictured), bottle brush sprays of soft needles. Red alder Alnus rubra Up to 75 feet, deciduous, open and damp habitats. Look for: Scalloped leaves, catkins, white gray bark. 2007, Neil Kramer Headwaters Flora History 2007, Neil Kramer Big leaf maple Acer macrophyllum Up to 75 feet, deciduous, open and damp habitats. Look for: Glossy dissected leaves, scaly dark brown bark. Headwaters Forest Reserve is home to approximately 3,000 acres of old-growth redwood forest, a remaining refuge for some of the most rare, majestic forest plants in the world. This ancient forest has grown here for millions of years. Today, it includes towering redwoods over 2,000 years old, and reaching heights over 300 feet. Grand fir Abies grandis 2015, Christopher Christie Up to 200 feet, evergreen, coniferous forests. Look for: Spray of flat needles with notched tips, upper needle surface green. Sitka willow Salix sitchensis Up to 75 feet, deciduous, open and damp habitats. Look for: Soft white velvet on the underside of the leaves. Conifersoftheworld.com Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis Up to 200 feet, evergreen, coniferous forests. Look for: Cones (pictured), short stiff and sharp needles. For Further Information: Bureau of Land Management Arcata Field Office 1695 Heindon Road Arcata, CA 95521 707-825-2300 www.blm.gov/crld 2007,Toni Corelli 2002,Gerald and Buff Corsi Tanoak Notholithocarpus densiflorus Up to 100 feet, evergreen, all forest habitats. Look for: Acorns with cup-like cap, lower surface of leaves wooly. BLM/CA/GI-2016/011+8600 Western hemlock Please recycle after use Tsuga heterophylla Up to 200 feet, evergreen, coniferous forests. Look for: Cones (pictured), soft needles, droopy branches. 2005, Bon Terra Consulting Redwood Sequoia sempervirens Over 300 feet, evergreen, dominant of mature forests. Look for: Soft brown-red bark, flat needles. 2001, Charles Webber Take a stroll along the Elk River Trail through a deciduous riparian forest community featuring red alder, big leaf maple, and Sitka willow. As the trail departs from the rivers’ edge, view tall second and third growth redwood forest reaching for the sky, while dense understory shrubs, ferns and herbs grow in the dappled light below. 2008,Timothy Ives BLM Photo Western red cedar Thuja plicata Up to 200 feet, evergreen, conifours forests. Look for: Small, dime sized cones, flat sprays of leaves. Headwaters Forest Reserve Common Plants Ferns Shrubs and Herbs Deer fern Blechnum spicant Up to 1 foot, evergreen, damp habitats. Look for: Smaller, stiffer fronds, lower to the ground. Evergreen huckleberry Vaccinum ovatum Up to 10 feet, evergreen. Look for: Fingertip sized leaves, dark blue-black berries. 2006, Charles E. Jones Sword fern Polystichum munitum Up to 4 feet, evergreen, common in all habitats. Look for: Larger fronds, most commonly seen fern. 2007, Lynn Watson Red huckleberry Vaccinum parvifolium Up to 10 feet, evergreen, open and forest habitats. Look for: Alternative leaves, red-orange berries. BLM Photo BLM Photo Five fingered fern Adiantum aleuticum Up to 1 foot, evergreen, found on damp banks. Look for: Smaller, drooping fronds, thin leaves. Oso berry Oemleria cerasiformis Up to 20 feet, deciduous, open and forest habitats. Look for: Hanging white flowers in the spring, elliptical leaves. Lady fern 2002, Gerald and Buff Corsi Athyrium filix-femina Up to 8 feet, dies back in the fall, common in all habitats. Look for: Single frond on tall stalks. 2008, Keir Morse Giant horsetail Equisetum telmateia Up to 3 to 5 feet, evergreen, open and damp habitats. Look for: Unique stem and leaf appearance. Blood currant Ribes sanguineum Up to 12 feet, deciduous, open and damp habitats. Look for: Five lobed leaves, hanging pink flowers, bluish black berries in late summer. 2002, Tony Morosco 2005, Bon Terra Consulting Cascara BLM Photo Frangula purshiana Up to 36 feet, deciduous, open and damp habitats. Look for: Long straight stems, black berries, purplish stems. 2007,Louis M.. Landry California blackberry Rubus ursinus Up to 10 feet, evergreen, open and disturbed habitats. Look for: Brambles with many slender and straight prickles on stems, fingertip sized, black 2005, Bon Terra Consulting berries. Himalayan blackberry Rubus armeniacus Up to 10 feet, evergreen. Open and disturbed habitats, invasive and not native. Look for: Robust stems and wide based, curved prickles. Queen Anne’s lace Daucus carota Up to 4 feet, dies back in the fall, open and disturbed habitats. Look for: Large white flower head with wispy leaves, not native. 2009, John Wall BLM Photo Red clintonia BLM Photo Clintonia andrewsiana Up to 2 feet, evergreen, mature forests. Look for: Waxy, rounded leaves, pink to rose purple flowers. BLM Photo Fetid adderstongue Scoliopus bigelovii Up to 3 feet, evergreen, mature forests. Look for: Brown spotted leave
Bag limits, seasons of use, and size restriction of fish can be found on the same web site. Fisherman and Fire Wildfire can be both beneficial and devastating. It can wipe out homes and businesses as well as rejuvenate forested lands and riparian areas. It is always best to leave fire to the professionals and always make sure your campfires and burning items are completely out before you leave. Please remember to be very careful with fire. fishing accidents. Always be sure of your footing when walking or wading (and it is generally better for you and the aquatic species to stay out of the streams and rivers while fishing). Large and small wildlife (snakes and mosquitos) can Nutria be an annoyance when fishing. Be aware of your surroundings and watch where you step. Wear mosquito and bug repellant with deet to keep them from eating you alive. As always, be careful when driving to and from your secret fishing hole. When boating, always have a Quagga Mussels life vest handy (and kids under 15 must always wear a vest while in a boat per California State Law). Mother Lode Field Office (916) 941-3101 5152 Hillsdale Circle El Dorado Hills, CA 95762-5713 (El Dorado Co.) freshwater/license-information. fishermen and women are injured or lose their lives in Applegate Field Office (530) 233-4666 708 W. 12th Street Alturas, CA 96101-3130 (Modoc Co.) at http://www.eregulations.com/california/fishing/ opportunity, it can be dangerous as well. Every year, Surprise Field Station (530) 279-6101 602 Cressler St. phy./ P.O. Box 460 mlg. Cedarville, CA 96104-0460 (Modoc Co.) California. A listing of those requirements may be found Eurasian Milfoil Palm Springs Field Office (760) 833-7100 1201 Bird Center Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262-8001 (Riverside Co.) Freshwater Fishing license issued by the State of Hyacinth Needles Field Office (760) 326-7000 1303 So. Hwy. 95 Needles, CA 92363-4217 (San Bernardino Co.) Even though fishing is a tremendous recreational license, you are required to possess a California Arcata Field Office (707) 825-2300 1695 Heindon Road Arcata, CA 95521-4573 (Humboldt Co.) While you are not required to have a “BLM” fishing Aquatic Invasive Species include Bakersfield Field Office (661) 391-6000 3801 Pegasus Drive Bakersfield, CA 933086837 (Kern Co.) Safety Barstow Field Office (760) 252-6000 2601 Barstow Road Barstow, CA 92311-6653 (San Bernardino Co.) License Requirement water to another. Redding Field Office (530) 224-2100 6640 Lockheed Drive Redding, CA 96002 (Shasta Co.) Never release plants, animals, or fish into water bodies. Never move fish or plants or bait from one Bishop Field Office (760) 872-5000 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100 Bishop, CA 93514-3101 (Inyo Co.) Dry – Completely dry equipment and gear between visits to fresh water systems. Ridgecrest Field Office (760) 384-5400 300 So. Richmond Road Ridgecrest, CA 93555-4436 (Kern Co.) Drain – Empty coolers, bilge pumps, and buckets of all water before leaving a water body. Central Coast Office (831) 582-2200 940 2nd Avenue Marina, CA 93933-6009 (San Benito Co.) Clean – Rinse and remove all mud and plant materials from boats, fishing equipment, and clothing. Ukiah Field Office (707) 468-4000 2550 N. State Street Ukiah, CA 95482-5194 (Mendocino Co.) serious and irreversible harm to aquatic habitats in California if allowed to spread unchecked. Eagle Lake Field Office (530) 257-0456 2550 Riverside Drive Susanville, CA 96130-4710 (Lassen Co.) Take measures to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive plants and animals. They can cause El Centro Field Office (760) 337-4400 1661 So. 4th Street El Centro, CA 92243-4561 (Imperial Co.) Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species f you have any questions, feel free to contact ny of the following BLM offices in California: uestions? Catch and Release A large percent of California freshwater anglers are catch and release fishermen — meaning they are very careful with the fish after they catch them and they release them back to the water as quickly as possible. It is always a good thing to keep your fish in a “fish friendly” net in the water until you are ready to release it. Barbless hooks Leave No Trace How to photograph your catch Take only pictures and leave artifacts where you find them. The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 makes removal of cultural resources punishable by fines and jail time. When it’s a catch and release fish species or regulation, that creates a challenge for getting a photo of your prize catch. Remember if you’re in a catch and release scenario keep the fish in the water at all times and take the photo of you also harm fish less that barbed ones. The use of live bait holding the fish in the water. is also a detriment to catch and release fishing. Please If it’s a not catch and release and it’s a keeper then you remember, the fish you catch and release today may be can have it out of the water. the fish yo

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