Bolsa Chica

State Beach - California

Bolsa Chica State Beach is located south of the Huntington Beach community of Sunset Beach in Orange County. This beach is used for surf fishing, especially in the tidal inlet channel at the southern end. Fish include perch, croaker, cabezon, California corbina, and shovelnose guitarfish. At new and full moons during the summer, grunion emerge from the ocean to spawn on the beach. Under state law, these fish may be caught by hand with a fishing permit. The beach extends 3 miles (5 km) from Warner Avenue in Sunset Beach south to Seapoint Avenue, where the Huntington City Beach begins. The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve is located across the busy Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) from the beach and is a popular spot for birdwatching. Lifeguards from the California State Parks Lifeguard Service patrol the beach year round and lifeguard towers are staffed during the summer. Other recreational activities include surfing and camping. The Bolsa Chica bicycle path runs along the length of Bolsa Chica State Beach through Huntington City Beach.
https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=642 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolsa_Chica_State_Beach Bolsa Chica State Beach is located south of the Huntington Beach community of Sunset Beach in Orange County. This beach is used for surf fishing, especially in the tidal inlet channel at the southern end. Fish include perch, croaker, cabezon, California corbina, and shovelnose guitarfish. At new and full moons during the summer, grunion emerge from the ocean to spawn on the beach. Under state law, these fish may be caught by hand with a fishing permit. The beach extends 3 miles (5 km) from Warner Avenue in Sunset Beach south to Seapoint Avenue, where the Huntington City Beach begins. The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve is located across the busy Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) from the beach and is a popular spot for birdwatching. Lifeguards from the California State Parks Lifeguard Service patrol the beach year round and lifeguard towers are staffed during the summer. Other recreational activities include surfing and camping. The Bolsa Chica bicycle path runs along the length of Bolsa Chica State Beach through Huntington City Beach.
Bolsa Chica & Huntington State Beaches Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Bolsa Chica and Huntington State Beaches offer an extraordinary combination of oceanside recreation close to tidal wetlands wildlife. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (714) 377-5691. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Bolsa Chica State Beach 17851 Pacific Coast Hwy. (714) 377-5691 Huntington Beach, CA 92648 Huntington State Beach 21601 Pacific Coast Hwy. (714) 536-1454 Huntington Beach, CA 92646 www.parks.ca.gov/huntington © 2014 California State Parks Printed on Recycled Paper F lat, sandy expanses at Bolsa Chica and Huntington State Beaches draw hundreds of thousands of visitors year round. Just off Pacific Coast Highway, Bolsa Chica State Beach and Huntington State Beach are both perfect places to surf, sunbathe, watch the sun set, and enjoy a blazing bonfire. Average summer temperatures range in the high 70s, while winter brings slightly cooler mid-60degree weather. Morning fog is common. parks history Native Californians For more than 8,000 years, indigenous people prospered in what is now called Orange County. The inhabitants of the Los Angeles basin between the present-day cities of Topanga and Laguna Beach have come to be called the Tongva and the Kizh. Another group, the Acjachemen, dwelled in coastal villages between northern Los Angeles and San Onofre Creek. Spanish King Carlos III wanted to expand Spain’s presence in Baja California north to Alta California in the mid-1700s. Soldiers and missionaries claimed the native people’s land to establish military presidios, religious missions and villages. Huntington Beach, ca. 1950 The Acjachemen, conscripted into building Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1771 by Franciscan friars and Spanish settlers, were renamed Juaneños; the Tongva and Kizh who built the mission at San Gabriel in 1776 were then called Gabrielinos or Gabrieleños. These tribal groups were forced to abandon their villages and cultural traditions. They were converted to Christianity and labored at such trades as adobe brickmaking and grape growing for the missions. Today, surviving Acjachemen/Juaneño, Tongva/Gabrielino, and Kizh/Gabrieleño native people continue to celebrate their cultures and heritage at local gatherings. Rancho to Subdivision In 1784 Spanish Governor Pedro Fages granted 33 leagues (nearly 114 miles) of this coast to Don Manuel Perez Nieto. Nieto called the land Rancho Las Bolsas (pockets) because its pockets of land were isolated by wetlands and the ocean. Nieto’s brother-inlaw Don Joaquin Ruiz inherited this portion, Rancho La Bolsa Chica — the little pocket. Oil Derricks and Tin Cans A 40-acre housing and commercial development, Pacific City, was built above the beachside bluffs in 1901, in hopes that Pacific City would rival tourist mecca Atlantic City on the East Coast. After railroad tycoon Henry Huntington extended his rail lines south, Pacific City was incorporated as Huntington Beach in 1909. The city’s growth remained slow until Standard Oil Company struck large oil and natural gas reserves on 500 leased acres in 1920; the well was called Bolsa Chica #1. The town’s population tripled, yet many buildings were moved aside for speculative oil drillers sinking wall-to-wall oil derricks. The Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) was completed in 1925, giving motor vehicles access to the oceanside towns. Beach visitors sunbathed alongside oil wells. Some derricks still exist, but as the price of coastal land grew, most wells were capped and the land developed. Huntington State Park was acquired by the State in 1942; it    was reclassified as a state beach in 1963. “Tin Can Beach", ca. 1960 Nearby, Post-World War II beachgoers seeking an escape from valley heat pitched canvas tents or shacks and slept on the unfenced sand at Bolsa Chica in the 1940s and ‘50s. The litter left by visitors earned Bolsa Chica the nickname “Tin Can Beach.” Eventually, local residents convinced the State to buy the eyesore; Tin Can Beach became Bolsa Chica State Beach in 1963. The Birth of Surf City USA In 1910, city founder Henry Huntington had hired Hawaiian-born surfer George Freeth, the “father of modern surfing,” to demonstrate the ancient Polynesian art of riding waves on a long wooden board. Heavy Hawaiian surfboards ranged fr
Playa Estatales Bolsa Chica y Huntington Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Las playas estatales Bolsa Chica y Huntington brindan una combinación extraordinaria de recreación oceánica junto a la vida silvestre California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (714) 377-5691. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Bolsa Chica State Beach 17851 Pacific Coast Hwy. (714) 377-5691 Huntington Beach, CA 92648 Huntington State Beach 21601 Pacific Coast Hwy. (714) 536-1454 Huntington Beach, CA 92646 www.parks.ca.gov/huntington © 2014 California State Parks de los humedales marinos. E n las playas estatales Bolsa Chica y Huntington, inmensas áreas arenosos y llanas atraen a cientos de miles de visitantes durante todo el año. Justo junto a la Ruta Estatal de la costa del Pacífico (conocida como Pacific Coast Highway), las playas estatales de Bolsa Chica y Huntington son los lugares perfectos para practicar surf, tomar sol, mirar el atardecer y disfrutar de hermosas fogatas. Las temperaturas promedio en el verano rondan los 70 grados, mientras que durante el invierno se perciben temperaturas promedio más bajas de 60 grados. Durante la mañana la niebla es algo común. HISTORIA DE LOS PARQUES Nativos Californianos Por más de 8,000 años, los pueblos indígenas prosperaron en lo que actualmente se llama el Condado de Orange. Los habitantes de la cuenca de Los Ángeles entre las ciudades actuales de Topanga y Laguna Beach vienen en llamarse tongva y kizh. Otro grupo, los acjachemen, habitaban en las villas costeras entre el norte de Los Ángeles y el arroyo San Onofre. A mediados del año 1700, el Rey español Carlos III decidió expandir la presencia de España desde Baja California hacia Alta California. Los soldados misioneros reclamaban las tierras de los nativos para establecer fuertes militares, misiones religiosas y villas. Huntington Beach, ca. 1950 Los acjachemen, conscriptos en la construcción de la misión San Juan Capistrano en 1771, y a cargo de frailes franciscanos y colonos españoles, recibieron un nuevo nombre y se los conoció como los juaneños; y a los tongva y kizh, quienes construyeron la misión San Gabriel en 1776, se los llamó gabrielinos o gabrieleños. Estos grupos tribales fueron obligados a abandonar sus villas y sus tradiciones culturales. Fueron convertidos al cristianismo y empleados en tareas como la fabricación de ladrillos y el cultivo de la vid para las misiones. Actualmente, los pueblos nativos sobrevivientes acjachemen/juaneño, tongva/ gabrielino y kizh/gabrieleño continúan celebrando sus culturas y sus herencias tradicionales en encuentros locales. Hacia la subdivisión del Rancho En 1784, el gobernador español Pedro Fages concedió 33 leguas (casi 114 millas) de esta costa a Don Manuel Perez Nieto. Nieto llamó Las Bolsas al rancho porque sus “bolsas” de tierra estaban aisladas de humedales y del océano. El cuñado de Nieto, Don Joaquín Ruiz heredó esta porción, Rancho La Bolsa Chica — la bolsa pequeña. Cabrias de petróleo y hojalatas En 1901, Pacific City, un complejo habitacional y comercial de 40 acres, se construyó por encima de los peñascos de la playa con la esperanza de que se convirtiera en la rival de la meca turística Atlantic City de la costa este. Luego de que el magnate ferroviario Henry Huntington extendiera las líneas del ferrocarril hacia el sur, Pacific City se incorporó con el nombre de Playa Huntington en 1909. El crecimiento de la ciudad se desarrolló de manera lenta hasta que en 1920 la compañía Standard Oil descubrió reservas de petróleo y gas natural en 500 acres arrendados y la reserva recibió el nombre de Bolsa Chica 1. La población del pueblo se triplicó, sin embargo, varios edificios se mudaron debido a la presencia de excavadores que hacían especulaciones e instalaban cabrias de petróleo de punta a punta. La Ruta Estatal de la costa del Pacífico se completó en 1925 lo cual permitió que los vehículos motorizados accedan a los pueblos costeros. Los visitantes de la playa que tomaban sol, loo hacían a lo largo de los pozos de petróleo. Algunas cabrias aún existen, sin embargo, a medida que los precios de las La fotografía es cortesía de los archivos del Condado de Orange “Playa de hojalata”, ca. 1960 tierras costeras incrementaron, la mayoría de los pozos se taparo
Bolsa Chica State Beach 17851 Pacific Coast Highway • Huntington Beach, CA 92648 (714) 377-2481 Bolsa Chica State Beach is a popular place for fishing, biking, surfing, volleyball and wildlife watching. The Park is located in the city of Huntington Beach and extends three miles from Sunset Beach to Seapoint Avenue. A multi-use trail connects Bolsa Chica with Huntington State Beach, seven miles south. Across the road from the beach is the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve, operated by the California Department of Fish and Game. CHECK-IN TIME is 2 p.m. Entrance gate closes at 9 p.m. SHARP. Check-out time is noon, and you must vacate your site by this time. Campers who choose to stay an additional night must re-register by noon. Campers cannot exceed a stay of 14 consecutive days during peak season. After a lapse of 24 hours, campers may register to camp again. Occupancy by the same persons, equipment or vehicles is limited to a total of 28 days in any calendar year. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. The campsite fee covers one recreational vehicle (RV). RVs must be present when registering for a campsite. Extra vehicles are allowed for a fee. There is no charge for a towed-in vehicle. Please have your receipt visibly displayed in the driver-side windshield of your camper or vehicle. If a towedin vehicle is detached and driven out of the park please be sure to display a camping receipt in the windshield for re-entry. CAMPSITES/VEHICLE PARKING: All RVs must BACK INTO their registered campsite. The RV and trailer length limit is 40 feet. A limit of two extra vehicles are allowed and may be parked only in your assigned campsite, within your lines and behind your number, including extra equipment, if they fit. You cannot reserve campsites to park extra vehicles nor park extra vehicles in empty campsites. No parallel parking. Self-contained RVs or tent trailers only. No car or tent camping is permitted. OCCUPANCY: Eight people maximum are allowed per campsite. DOGS must be on a leash no longer than six feet and under supervision at all times. They are allowed on the parking lot and multi-use trail only. Dogs are not permitted on the beach (except for service dogs). You must clean up after your pets—no exceptions. Dogs must be confined to a vehicle at night. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit inside the park is 25 mph. The maximum speed limit inside the campground is 5 mph and the road is ONE WAY only. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. ALCOHOL is only allowed within a registered campsite, with persons 21 and older. No glass containers of any kind are allowed. GENERATOR operation is not allowed. In the event hookups are not working, generators may be operated only between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. WATER: Dumping gray or fresh water on the ground is not allowed. Two RV sanitation stations are available for use. One is located on the north end of the campground. The second is located at Huntington State Beach and you are allowed access with your camping registration. FIRE RINGS on the sand are available on a firstcome, first-served basis. They are not included or guaranteed with campsite. Keep children away from fire rings, as they may contain hot coals and ashes. DAY-USE hours are from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Day use offers beach access, restrooms, showers, and picnic tables. The multi-use trail is a high-use area. Please keep personal belongings off trail and look both ways before crossing. All day-use guests must park in the day-use area. Guest vehicles staying after the park closes must have a camping receipt displayed in the driver-side windshield. Violation of the above regulations may result in a citation or your ejection from the park. Discover the many states of California.TM CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting (800) 777-0369, 711, TTY relay service. Bolsa Chica State Beach Sunset Beach Warner Ave. Huntington Beach Pier S a nt a Ocean er Huntington Beach Ana R iv 1 Beach Blvd. Bolsa Chica State Beach Pacific 405 39 Huntington State Beach to Crystal Cove State Beach (12 mi) For Emergencies Dial 9-1-1. FOLLOW SAFETY TIPS: • SWIM NEAR A LIFEGUARD. NEVER SWIM ALONE! • Swim in a lifeguard area only during duty hours. • Long-distance swimming is best done parallel to the shore. • Don’t panic if you are being pulled off shore by a rip current. Swim toward shore at a 45-degree angle. • Check with lifeguards regarding ocean conditions before entering water. • Help prevent injuries to yourself or others by reporting unsafe conditions immediately. • Never dive into shallow water, and always exercise caution when swimming in surf. • Never fake drowning actions or call for help. • Avoid digging deep holes in sand to prevent cave-in accidents. The ocean should be
Huntington State Beach is the site of a nesting sanctuary for the California least tern, a rare and endangered species. The beach also provides sanctuary for the threatened Western snowy plover. The park features a bicycle trail, and surfing, skating and surf fishing are popular. Pacific Ocean 39 Huntington Beach er 1 405 Ana R iv Bolsa Chica State Beach PARK FEES & REGULATIONS CONTINUED Warner Ave. S a nt a 21601 Pacific Coast Highway Huntington Beach, CA 92646 (714) 536-1455 Sunset Beach Beach Blvd. Huntington State Beach Huntington Beach Pier Huntington State Beach to Crystal Cove State Beach (12 mi) PARK FEES & REGULATIONS DAY-USE FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Please have your receipt visibly displayed in the driver-side windshield of your vehicle. DAY-USE hours are from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. The multi-use trail is a high-use area. Please keep personal belongings off trail and look both ways before crossing. All day-use guests must park in the day-use area. Overnight camping is not allowed. DOGS must be on a leash no longer than six feet and under supervision at all times. They are allowed on the parking lot and multi-use trail only. Dogs are not permitted on the beach (except for service dogs). You must clean up after your pets—no exceptions. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit inside the park is 15 mph. ALCOHOL is NOT ALLOWED. No glass containers of any kind are allowed. Continued on next page. Discover the many states of California.TM For more information, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting California State Parks at (800) 777-0369, or 711, TTY relay service. SANITATION STATION: Dumping gray or fresh water on the ground is not allowed. An RV sanitation station is available for use. It is located in lot 2 just north of the Brookhurst Kiosk. FIRE RINGS on the sand are available first-come, firstserved. Keep children away from fire rings, as they may contain hot coals and ashes. Violation of the above regulations may result in a citation or your ejection from the park. FOLLOW BEACH SAFETY TIPS: • SWIM NEAR A LIFEGUARD. NEVER SWIM ALONE! • Check with lifeguards regarding ocean conditions before entering water. • Swim in a lifeguard area only during duty hours. • Long-distance swimming is best done parallel to the shore. • Don’t panic if you are being pulled offshore by a rip current. Swim toward shore at a 45-degree angle. • Help prevent injuries to yourself or others by reporting unsafe conditions immediately. • Never dive into shallow water, and always exercise caution when swimming in surf. • Never fake drowning actions or call for help. • Avoid digging deep holes in sand to prevent cave-in accidents. The ocean should be considered a potentially hazardous environment, so always use extreme caution. Adams Huntington State Beach Indianapolis Shell Station Bank Hamilton Bushard Edison Plant Wildlife Refuge Center to city beach Pacific Coast Highway Brookhurst Blvd. Blvd. Cabrillo Homes Magnolia St. Newland Blvd. Beach Bank of America Atlanta Avenue 1 Sanitation Plant to Newport Beach HEADQUARTERS, LIFEGUARD HQ LOT 10 Huntington City Lifeguards 17 16 15 LOT 9 LOT 8 14 13 LOT 7 12 11 LOT 6 10 LOT 5 LOT 4 9 8 7 LOT 3 6 LOT 2 5 LOT 1 4 3 Pacific Ocean Huntington Beach Extension LEGEND Multi-use Trail Maps not to scale. Santa Ana Bike Path # Lifeguard Station Parking Concessions Dump Station Shade Ramada Ramp LOT 1 LOT 0 2 For Emergencies Dial 9-1-1. © 2009 (Rev. 2012) California State Parks Least Tern Preserve JG Island USOS Tower Pacific Ocean Santa Ana River Mouth Restroom to Newport Beach PCH 1 Channel Telephone Talbert Kiosk Newport Tower

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