"California State Mining and Mineral Museum." by California Department of Parks and Recreation , public domain

California State Mining and Mineral Museum

Park Property - California

The California State Mining and Mineral Museum interprets the state's mineral resources and mining heritage. It is located in Mariposa on the Mariposa County fairgrounds. The big news of 1848 was the discovery of gold in California. This event created international interest and soon a mass immigration of fortune seekers and pioneers trekked their way to pan the streams for gold in the Sierra Nevada foothills. More than a century later, gold and legends of Old West mining continue to fascinate historians. Although this is one of California's newest state parks, the museum houses a collection that was started in 1865 in San Francisco — the official California State Mineral Collection, with over 13,000 minerals, rocks, gems, fossils, and historic artifacts. Recently returned (in 2000) is the popular crystalline gold "Fricot Nugget", weighing 201 troy ounces (6.25 kg) — the largest one found during the Gold Rush.

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Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=588 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_State_Mining_and_Mineral_Museum The California State Mining and Mineral Museum interprets the state's mineral resources and mining heritage. It is located in Mariposa on the Mariposa County fairgrounds. The big news of 1848 was the discovery of gold in California. This event created international interest and soon a mass immigration of fortune seekers and pioneers trekked their way to pan the streams for gold in the Sierra Nevada foothills. More than a century later, gold and legends of Old West mining continue to fascinate historians. Although this is one of California's newest state parks, the museum houses a collection that was started in 1865 in San Francisco — the official California State Mineral Collection, with over 13,000 minerals, rocks, gems, fossils, and historic artifacts. Recently returned (in 2000) is the popular crystalline gold "Fricot Nugget", weighing 201 troy ounces (6.25 kg) — the largest one found during the Gold Rush.
California State Mining and Mineral Museum Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. The specimens in today’s collection include a gracefully curved sheet of natural copper, a platinum nugget, gold, precious gems, rocks, and mineral crystals from California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (209) 742-7625. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov California State Mining and Mineral Museum 5005 Fairgrounds Rd., Mariposa, CA 95338 (209) 742-7625 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) every continent on Earth. T he California State Mining and Mineral Museum, situated along Highway 49 in the historic gold-rush town of Mariposa, houses, displays, and interprets the official California State Mineral Collection. The museum, located at the Mariposa County fairgrounds, is dedicated to teaching the visiting public about the importance of mining and minerals to California’s history, environment, economy, and future. The collection began in 1880; since then, visitors and researchers have been dazzled by the many exceptional specimens of California’s gemstones and minerals  —  such as gold, silver, copper, and platinum  —  in the museum. The remarkable items on display include original mining artifacts and historical documents, precious mineral and gem specimens from all over the world, minerals that glow in the dark, and even several “outer space” rocks (meteorites). News of the 1848 gold discovery brought about 100,000 would-be millionaires from all over the world. Thinking that gold lay around underfoot, some had planned to fill their pockets and return home wealthy. Many gave up after realizing that not even a lot of hard work could make them rich overnight. California State Mining Bureau In 1880 State legislators established the California State Mining Bureau. A vital service offered by the new agency was classifying and identifying minerals found anywhere in California. Before long, the new bureau was inundated with specimens submitted for identification from all over the world. Henry G. Hanks, the first California State Mineralogist, was hired to examine and classify specimens submitted to the Mining Bureau. Hanks was directed to make his findings available for scientific and educational purposes. CALIFORNIA MINING HISTORY Only small mining operations preceded California’s 1848 gold discovery in Coloma. Gems (precious or semiprecious stones) such as turquoise, garnets, and even diamonds had been found in Amador, Butte, El Dorado, Nevada, and Trinity counties. Silver, copper, mercury, and other minerals had previously been mined Mining for minerals in California. A Home for the Collection The State’s initial collection  — 1,327 specimens donated by the California State Geological Society  —  was first displayed in the State Mining Bureau’s San Francisco offices. Ore specimens and donations were constantly added. Between 1880 and 1983, the collection moved five times. The Ferry Building on the Embarcadero housed the collection until 1983 when building renovations forced yet another move. Junior Rangers earn their badges. The Mariposa County Board of Supervisors requested that the specimens be moved to the town of Mariposa; in July 1983, the entire collection was packed and moved to a temporary location in the old Mariposa County Jail. The more valuable specimens were stored in a bank vault in Mariposa. The collection was finally moved to its new home at the Mariposa County Fairgrounds in 1986, and the former Mining Council Building became the main exhibit area. The museum was transferred to California State Parks in 1999. At present, California State Mining and Mineral Museum is the only state park without any associated land. The Collection Today The museum collection has grown tenfold since its beginning and holds over 13,000 specimens, with about 350 rotating on display at any one time. Original historical documents include a map of John C. Frémont’s Mexican The Fricot Nugget The legendary Fricot (free-co) Nugget — weighing 13.8 pounds  — is the largest remaining intact mass of crystalline gold dating back to the California gold rush. The specimen of gold crystallized when hot goldbearing quartz veinlets cooled in softer slate and schist rock. This rare specimen was discovered in a mud pocket deep in the Grit Mine, near the American River’s middle fork, by William Russell Davis in August of 1864. In 1865, Grass
Museo Estatal de Minería y Minerales de California Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Las muestras de la colección actual incluyen una lámina elegantemente curva de cobre natural, una pepita de platino, oro, piedras California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (209) 742-7625. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov California State Mining and Mineral Museum 5005 Fairgrounds Rd., Mariposa, CA 95338 (209) 742-7625 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2017) preciosas, rocas y cristales minerales de todos los continentes de la Tierra. E l Museo Estatal de Minería y Minerales de California, situado junto a la Autopista 49 en el pueblo histórico de la fiebre del oro, Mariposa, alberga, exhibe e interpreta la Colección Oficial de Minerales del Estado de California. El museo, ubicado en los recintos feriales del Condado de Mariposa, está dedicado a educar al público visitante sobre la importancia de la minería y los minerales en la historia, ambiente, economía y futuro de California. La colección comenzó en 1880, y desde entonces, visitantes e investigadores se han deslumbrado en el museo por las muchas muestras excepcionales de piedras preciosas y minerales de California, tal como el oro, la plata, el cobre y el platino. Los elementos remarcables en exhibición incluyen artefactos originales de minería y documentos históricos, minerales preciosos y muestras de gemas preciosas de todo el mundo, minerales que brillan en la oscuridad e incluso muchas rocas del “espacio exterior” (meteoritos). HISTORIA MINERA DE CALIFORNIA Solo pequeñas operaciones mineras precedieron al descubrimiento de oro en California en 1848, en Coloma. Gemas (piedras preciosas o semipreciosas) tales como la turquesa, el granate e incluso diamantes se han encontrado en los condados de Amador, Butte, El Dorado, Nevada y Trinity. Plata, cobre, mercurio y otros minerales habían sido extraídos previamente en California. Las noticias del descubrimiento del oro en 1848 trajeron a cerca de 100,000 aspirantes a millonarios de todo el mundo. Con el pensamiento de que el oro yacía bajo los pies, algunos habían planeado llenar sus bolsillos y regresar ricos a sus hogares. Muchos se rindieron después de darse cuenta que ni siquiera mucho trabajo duro los podría hacer rico de la noche a la mañana. Oficina estatal de minería de California En 1880, los legisladores estatales establecieron la Oficina Estatal de Minería de California. Un servicio vital que ofrecía la nueva agencia era clasificar e identificar minerales hallados en cualquier parte de California. En poco tiempo, la nueva oficina estaba inundada con muestras enviadas para su identificación desde todas partes del mundo. Henry G. Hanks, el primer mineralogista del estado de California, fue contratado para examinar y clasificar muestras enviadas a la Oficina de Minería. Hanks recibió la instrucción de que sus hallazgos estuvieran disponibles para fines científicos y educativos. Extracción de minerales Exploradores juveniles reciben sus medallas. Un hogar para la colección La colección inicial del Estado, 1,327 muestras donadas por la Sociedad Geológica del Estado de California, se exhibió primero en las oficinas de la Oficina Estatal de Minería en San Francisco. Se agregaron constantemente muestras de la mena y donaciones. Entre 1880 y 1983, se mudó la colección cinco veces. El edificio Ferry Building en el Embarcadero albergó la colección hasta 1983 cuando las renovaciones del edificio obligaron a realizar otra mudanza. La Junta de Supervisores del Condado de Mariposa solicitó que las muestras se trasladaran al pueblo de Mariposa; en julio de 1983, toda la colección se empacó y se trasladó a una ubicación temporal en la antigua cárcel del Condado de Mariposa. Las muestras más valiosas se almacenaron en una bóveda bancaria en Mariposa. La pepita Fricot La legendaria pepita Fricot (fri-co), que pesa 13.8 libras, es la masa intacta restante más grande de oro cristalino que se remonta a la fiebre del oro en California. La muestra de oro se cristalizó cuando las venillas de cuarzo con oro caliente se enfriaron y pasaron a ser pizarra y esquisto más suaves. En agosto de 1864, William Russell Davis descubrió esta muestra rara en una cavidad de lodo profunda en la mina de arena, cerca de la bifurc

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