Cuyamaca Rancho

State Park - California

Cuyamaca Rancho State Park is located 40 miles (64 km) east of San Diego in the Cuyamaca and Laguna Mountains of the Peninsular Ranges. The park's 26,000 acres (11,000 ha) feature pine, fir, and oak forests, with meadows and streams that exist due to the relatively high elevation of the area compared to its surroundings. The park includes 6,512-foot (1,985 m) Cuyamaca Peak, the second-highest point in San Diego County. Park amenities include trails for hiking, horseback riding, and mountain biking, as well as campgrounds for family, group, equestrian, and primitive trail camping; as well as an exhibit at a former gold mine, the Stonewall Mine. Wildlife in the area includes mountain lions, which have been known to attack humans, and park literature emphasizes avoiding encounters with them. Numerous other species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians are known to reside within the park.

maps

Map of Routes of Travel for Eastern San Diego in El Centro Field Office area. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Eastern San Diego - Travel Map

Map of Routes of Travel for Eastern San Diego in El Centro Field Office area. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=667 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuyamaca_Rancho_State_Park Cuyamaca Rancho State Park is located 40 miles (64 km) east of San Diego in the Cuyamaca and Laguna Mountains of the Peninsular Ranges. The park's 26,000 acres (11,000 ha) feature pine, fir, and oak forests, with meadows and streams that exist due to the relatively high elevation of the area compared to its surroundings. The park includes 6,512-foot (1,985 m) Cuyamaca Peak, the second-highest point in San Diego County. Park amenities include trails for hiking, horseback riding, and mountain biking, as well as campgrounds for family, group, equestrian, and primitive trail camping; as well as an exhibit at a former gold mine, the Stonewall Mine. Wildlife in the area includes mountain lions, which have been known to attack humans, and park literature emphasizes avoiding encounters with them. Numerous other species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians are known to reside within the park.
Cuyamaca Rancho State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Hidden waterfalls and more than 100 miles of trails through forest and meadow silently witness the regrowth of Cuyamaca Rancho California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (760) 765-3020. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Cuyamaca Rancho State Park 13652 Highway 79 Julian, CA 92036 (760) 765-3020 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) Printed on Recycled Paper State Park. E ast of San Diego, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park offers respite from the dry Southern California landscape. The park’s 24,700 acres of oak and conifer forests and expansive meadows are broken by running streams. Located in the Peninsular Range of mountains, Cuyamaca Peak, at 6,512 feet, is the second highest point in San Diego County. From the peak, visitors can see Anza-Borrego Desert State Park to the east and the Pacific coastline to the west. Over half of the park’s acreage is designated as state wilderness. HISTORY Native People The ancestors of today’s Kumeyaay Indians occupied the Cuyamaca mountains from antiquity into the historic period. Their village sites are located throughout the state park, including Ah-ha’ Kwe-ah-mac’ (”what the rain left behind”), Iguai’ (“the nest”), Wa-Ku-Pin’ (“warm house”), Mitaragui’ (“crooked land”), Pilcha’ (“basket bush”), and Guatay’ (“big house”). Historic mention of the Cuyamaca Kumeyaay begins in 1782 when Spanish Lt. Col. Pedro Fages noted that the villagers “approached me very pleasantly and I gave them some beads.” However, the Kumeyaay did not want to give up their independence, and resisted missionization. In 1837 a Mexican expedition attacked the villagers of Ah-ha’ Kwe-ah-mac’ after the Kumeyaay raided two ranchos to the south, eventually exacting a promise from the Kumeyaay to leave the settlers alone. Augustin Olvera of Los Angeles obtained the Rancho Cuyamaca grant in 1845. Olvera intended to harvest timber but his contractor, Cesario Walker “being afraid of the Indians, who made a kind of revolution, abandoned the place.” By 1857, few Kumeyaay remained. James Lassator reportedly bought 160 acres in Green Valley from the last hereditary chief of the region. Lassator’s family maintained a home, hay fields, and a way-station there, supplying those using the area’s early overland trails until after his death in 1865. Gold Mining in Cuyamaca The 1869 discovery of gold near today’s town of Julian triggered a brief but frenzied rush to the Cuyamaca mountains. The southernmost and most profitable of the mines was the Stonewall, located south Kumeyaay dwelling Sketch by J.W. Audubon, 1849 of the Laguna Cuyamaca. By 1872, this profitable hard-rock mine supported a permanent worker’s camp and mill. In 1886 mining entrepreneur and soon-to-be California Governor Robert W. Waterman purchased and expanded the Stonewall’s operations. At its peak from 1886 to 1891, the mine produced over 7,000 pounds of gold while regularly employing 200 men and housing their families at its company town, Cuyamaca City. Financial problems ensued after Waterman’s death, and by 1892 hardrock mining had ended. Stonewall Peak hikers Later owners separated remaining gold from previously milled ore tailings with cyanide leaching until final closure in 1906. After the miners left, Cuyamaca City continued for several years as a mountain resort. Becoming a State Park Capitalist Ralph M. Dyar bought the rancho in 1923, along with partners planning a resort development for the lakefront’s northern half. Dyar also built his family a beautiful second home in Green Valley, using local stone and salvaged materials from the Stonewall Mine ruins. The Dyar House later served as park headquarters and visitor center until the 2003 Cedar Fire reduced it to ruins. The Great Depression ended Dyar’s development plans; in 1933 he sold the property to California for its new State Park System. Cuyamaca Rancho State Park was doubly benefited in the 1930s by the placement of two Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps that provided National Park Service designers and CCC labor to develop the park’s initial and distinctive “park rustic” facilities, including many of today’s popular campgrounds and trails. NATURAL HISTORY The Cedar Fire On October 25, 2003, a lost hunter lit a signal fire, hoping to be found. That signal fire quickly burned out of control and became the big
Parque Estatal Cuyamaca Rancho Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Cascadas ocultas y más de 100 millas de senderos a través del bosque y la pradera son testigos silenciosos del renacimiento del California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (760) 765-3020. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Cuyamaca Rancho State Park 13652 Highway 79 Julian, CA 92036 (760) 765-3020 © 2010 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) Parque Estatal Cuyamaca Rancho. A l este de San Diego, el Parque Estatal Cuyamaca Rancho ofrece un descanso del paisaje árido del sur de California. Los 24,700 acres de bosques de robles y coníferas del parque y las praderas extensas son atravesados por corrientes abundantes. Ubicada en la Cordillera Peninsular, Pico Cuyamaca, a 6,512 pies, es el segundo punto más alto del Condado de San Diego. Desde el pico, los visitantes pueden ver el Parque Estatal Desierto Anza-Borrego al este y la línea costera del Pacífico al oeste. Más de la mitad de la superficie del parque está designada como área silvestre estatal. HISTORIA Pueblos nativos Los ancestros de los actuales indígenas Kumeyaay ocuparon las montañas Cuyamaca desde la antigüedad hasta el periodo histórico. Sus aldeas están ubicadas a lo largo del parque estatal, e incluyen Ah-ha’ Kwe-ah-mac’ (”lo que dejó la lluvia”), Iguai’ (“el nido”), Wa-Ku-Pin’ (“casa cálida”), Mitaragui’ (“terreno torcido”), Pilcha’ (“arbusto cesto”) y Guatay’ (“casa grande”). La mención histórica de los Kumeyaay de Cuyamaca comienza en 1782 cuando el Teniente Coronel español Pedro Fages notó que los aldeanos “se acercaron a mí de manera muy grata y les di algunas cuentas”. Sin embargo, los Kumeyaay no querían renunciar a su independencia y se resistieron a los misioneros. En 1837, una expedición mexicana atacó a los aldeanos de Ah-ha’ Kwe-ah-mac’ después de que los Kumeyaay asaltaron dos ranchos al sur y a la larga se exigió una promesa de los Kumeyaay de dejar a los colonos en paz. Agustín Olvera de Los Ángeles obtuvo la concesión de Rancho Cuyamaca en 1845. Olvera pretendía talar madera pero su contratista, Cesario Walker, “temiendo a los indígenas, quienes habían hecho un tipo de revolución, abandonó el lugar”. Para 1857, quedaban pocos Kumeyaay. Según se informa, James Lassator compró 160 acres en Green Valley del último jefe hereditario de la región. La familia de Lassator mantuvo un hogar, campos de heno y una estación de paso allí, y proveyó de suministros a aquellos que usaban los primeros caminos terrestres del área hasta después de su muerte en 1865. Vivienda Kumeyaay Bosquejo de J.W. Audubon, 1849 Minería de oro en Cuyamaca El descubrimiento del oro en 1869 cerca del pueblo actual de Julian causó una fiebre de oro breve pero frenética hacia las montañas Cuyamaca. El extremo sur y el más rentable de las minas era Stonewall, ubicada al sur de Laguna Cuyamaca. Para 1872, esta mina rentable de piedra dura mantenía un campo de obreros y un molino permanentes. En 1886, el empresario minero Robert W. Waterman, que en poco tiempo sería gobernador de California, compró Stonewall y expandió sus operaciones. En su auge de 1886 a 1891, la mina produjo más de 7,000 libras de oro mientras empleaba de manera regular a 200 hombres y albergaba a sus familias en el pueblo de la compañía, Ciudad Cuyamaca. Los problemas financieros surgieron después de la muerte de Waterman y para 1892 la minería de piedra dura había terminado. Los propietarios posteriores separaron el oro restante de los residuos previamente molidos de la mena mediante la lixiviación con cianuro hasta el cierre final en 1906. Después de que se fueron los mineros, Ciudad Cuyamaca continuó funcionando por varios años como un resort de montaña. Conversión en parque estatal El capitalista Ralph M. Dyar compró el rancho en 1923, y planeaba con sus socios el desarrollo de un resort en la mitad norte del terreno junto al lago. Dyar también construyó para su familia un segundo hogar hermoso en Green Valley usando piedra local y el material rescatado de las ruinas de la mina de Stonewall. La Casa Dyar sirvió más adelante como oficina central del parque y centro de visitantes hasta que en el 2003 el incendio Cedar la redujo a ruinas. La Gran Depresión terminó los planes de desarrollo de Dyar; en 1933 vendió la pro
Cuyamaca Rancho State Park 13652 Hwy. 79 • Julian, CA 92036 (760) 765-0755 VEHICLE PARKING: Please park only in designated campsites or day-use parking spaces. mi. Los Vaqueros Group Horse Camp Stonewall Peak 79 3m Visitor Center Outdoor School 2m i. Green Valley Campground i. 6 .5 m I- 8 o 5.6 mi. an s sc De 79 LOADED WEAPONS are not allowed in the park. This includes firearms, BB guns, and air guns. Weapons that are unloaded may be kept in vehicles if they are rendered temporarily inoperable or packed, cased, or stored in a manner that will prevent their ready use. PLANTS are protected. Do not gather flowers, acorns, pinecones, leaves, etc. Do not hang anything from the shrubs or trees that may cause harm, such as lanterns or other flammables, hammocks, or other heavy objects. ORGANIZED GAMES that cause resource damage or disturb others are prohibited. i. PETS: Dogs must be leashed at all times. They are not allowed on the Paso Picacho trails, in the meadows, or at the Campground falls. On leash, they may be walked on the Cuyamaca Peak Fire Road. Cuyamaca Keep pets in at night, and never Peak leave them alone at your campsite. BICYCLES are restricted to the pavement and approved trails. Please pay attention to signs and read the maps to stay on legal trails. Helmets are required for persons under 18. Ride cautiously, and yield to hikers and horseback riders. Stonewall Mine 1 mi. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit in the campgrounds is 15 mph and 5 mph on curves. FIRES AND FIREWOOD: Please be cautious when building fires—wildfire danger is especially high during the summer. Fires are allowed only in established fire rings or camp stoves. Wood gathering is not allowed in the park. Purchase firewood at the park entrance and at camp host sites. Cuyamaca Lake 1.3 NOISE: At no time may music or noise extend beyond the limits of your campsite. At 10 p.m., all radios must be turned off and voices lowered. Generators may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. 79 CAMP HOSTS are here to collect fees and provide public assistance and information. They are volunteers and do a great service to the park and the public. Please respect them, and remember that any contact from them regarding a violation in a campsite is the same as a warning from a ranger. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. RESERVATIONS for camping are strongly recommended for weekends from Easter through Thanksgiving, and can be made by calling (800) 444-7275. *For Identification of symbols, see legend on reverse. CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. L 84 83 82 85 h G l en Loo p ril Nature 34 33 Den 35 27 24 32 26 5 22 31 t ou Loop Azalea 1 L o oko ut Fire Roa d 7 28 23 24 25 49 26 Arroyo Seco Picnic Area ne Tr M on um Riv t en a Tr Trail 70 6 7 © 2011 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) 8 11 10 9 12 Maps not to scale 13 15 14 2 3 1 4 5 Fire Road Paved Road 80 81 79 78 43 68 41 65 77 69 38 42 66 76 75 74 67 7273 71 911. ge Rid 35 36 37 47 52 51 50 48 46 45 30 56 61 44 31 55 57 62 63 60 32 58 59 34 33 39 40 64 29 54 53 27 To Arroyo Seco Primitive Camp Showers RV Sanitation Center Restrooms For Emergency, Dial Day-Use Parking Day-Use Picnic Area 20 81 37 25 23 21 80 29 38 2 28 79 39 30 55 54 77 57 53 40 4143 19 5 56 78 34 59 42 62 18 76 45 51 61 75 58 46 2 17 6 52 44 49 73 60 16 13 74 50 47 12 63 64 14 48 72 11 7069 67 65 9B 8 71 66 10 1 9A 4 3 68 Manzanita Live Oak Cedar Coulter Cypress S . Accessibility is continually improving. For information on accessible features in the park, visit http://access.parks.ca.gov. 1 2 3 4 5 No r tu Na 79 Ranger Station Horse Campground Cabin il Picnic Area Group Campground Bridge Campground Parking Campfire Center Accessible Campsite re T ra # LEGEND il Cuyamaca Rancho State Park Paso Paso Picacho Campground p oo er Pi th Ta wat a il S et we er

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