Ed Z'berg Sugar Pine Point

State Park - California

Ed Z'berg Sugar Pine Point State Park is a state park in California in the United States. It occupies nearly two miles of the western shore of Lake Tahoe[3] and a total of about 1,000 hectares (2,500 acres) of forested mountains in El Dorado County. Originally called Sugar Pine Point State Park, its name was changed in 2003 to honor Edwin L. Z'berg, a California state assemblyman who specialized in environmental legislation and worked to develop state parks and other natural areas.

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Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=510 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Z'berg_Sugar_Pine_Point_State_Park Ed Z'berg Sugar Pine Point State Park is a state park in California in the United States. It occupies nearly two miles of the western shore of Lake Tahoe[3] and a total of about 1,000 hectares (2,500 acres) of forested mountains in El Dorado County. Originally called Sugar Pine Point State Park, its name was changed in 2003 to honor Edwin L. Z'berg, a California state assemblyman who specialized in environmental legislation and worked to develop state parks and other natural areas.
Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Tahoe, called Da ow a ga by native Washoe people, is termed “Lake of the Sky” for its elevation, depth and exceptional clarity. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 525-7982. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park State Park Road at Hwy. 89 Mail: P.O. Box 266 Tahoma, CA 96142-0266 (530) 525-7982 © 2002 California State Parks (Rev. 2013) L ake Tahoe, at 6,229 feet above sea level, is known for its great depth and clear, exquisitely blue waters. The natural, cultural and recreational diversity of Lake Tahoe rests on a fragile balance, and its ecosystem is aggressively protected by a number of agencies, conservation organizations, state and federal legislatures, and concerned citizens. The largest of the state parks at Lake Tahoe, Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point is 2,000 acres of dense pine, fir, aspen and cedar forests set behind nearly two miles of lake frontage. This is the only Tahoe-area park where camping in the snow (conditions permitting) is part of the lake’s winter experience. Located ten miles south of Tahoe City on the west side of Lake Tahoe, the park’s acreage extends three-and-a-half miles into the U.S. Forest Service’s Desolation Wilderness area. The park’s showpiece is the elegant but rustic 11,000-square-foot Pine Lodge  —  also called the Ehrman Mansion. It is a fine example of the grand, turn-of-the-century summer homes of the well-to-do who began to settle the lake shore in the early 1900s. Here, they could escape their bustling city lives and reconnect, if only temporarily, to the serenity and recreation of the outdoors. Plant communities The canyon floor’s rocky debris was deposited approximately 10,000 years ago by glacier melt. The dense forests consist of white and red firs, incense cedars, Jeffrey and ponderosa pines and the park’s namesake, the sugar pine. Lodgepole pines, quaking aspens, black cottonwood and mountain alders thrive along General Creek. Wildflowers bloom during spring and summer, with Indian paintbrush, Sugar pine cone lupine, columbine, penstemon, several kinds of buckwheat and snowplant among the showiest. The thick shrubbery is mainly composed of green-leaf and pinemat manzanita, squaw carpet, mountain whitethorn, chinquapin and huckleberry oak. Wildlife The Tahoe area is home to many large and small animals. California black bears, tree squirrels, chipmunks, Beechey and golden-mantled ground squirrels, raccoons and coyotes are frequently seen in the campgrounds and other developed areas. Porcupines, pine martens, beavers, bobcats and deer are occasionally spotted in more remote areas of the park. Mallards The bird population includes ospreys, Steller’s jays, juncos, nuthatches, mountain chickadees, flycatchers, goshawks, woodpeckers and western tanagers. Canada geese, mergansers, mallards and kingfishers can usually be spotted near streams and the lake. A fortunate winter visitor might be rewarded with the sight of a bald eagle perched in a tree overlooking the lake. Preservation As the beauty and Black bear grandeur of Lake Tahoe came to the world’s attention, so too did the fragility of its ecosystem. Scientists are continually learning about the lake’s uniqueness and sensitivity. In the face of decades of development, the Lake Tahoe history being written in the 21st century is one of protection and, in some cases, restoration. Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park plays a part in recording this important aspect of human history as well. One example is the creation of the Edwin L. Z’berg Natural Preserve. During your visit, you may also see evidence of various ongoing natural resource management programs. Erosion control, thinning of overcrowded forests, removal of dead trees in high-use areas, prescribed burning, and habitat improvement are a few of the many projects being undertaken to maintain, restore and preserve natural conditions within the park. the first permanent non-native resident on Tahoe’s West Shore. He staked a homestead claim on Sugar Pine Point in the spring of 1860. His first cabin was lost to fire, but his second residence may be visited near the North Boathouse. Settlement of the Tahoe region continued into the 20th century. In 1899 a railway linke
Ed Z’Berg Sugar Pine Point State Park Hwy. 89 • West Shore Lake Tahoe, Tahoma, CA 96142 • (530) 525-7982 allowed to recycle back into the ecosystem. You may purchase firewood at the entrance station. CH 25 s 76-1 e t i S y Group Camping Family Sites Famil Sites 1-10 47-59 Paved Road Campfire Center Parking Unpaved Road Fishing Restrooms Trail: Hiking Only Group Camping RV Sanitation Paved Trail: Hike & Bike Group Picnic Area Showers Lighthouse Swimming Picnic Area Wood Sales Accessible Feature CH Overflow Parking CH LEGEND No Bikes No Dogs Camp Host Site il Tra ry ud ea dB Ro FIRES AND FIREWOOD Please be cautious when building fires—wildfire danger is especially high during the summer. Fires are allowed only in established fire rings or camp stoves. Do not build ground fires outside the fire rings or leave campfires unattended. Do not gather firewood in the park—the nutrients must be Family Sites 126-175 Sugar Pine Point Lighthouse Edwin L. Z'Berg Natural Preserve th Pa ke Bi DOGS Dogs must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under control at all times. They are not permitted in buildings, on trails (except paved trails), or beaches. Dogs must be confined to a vehicle or tent from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Showers Closed Daily 12 noon to 2 p.m. To Lil ly Po nd CHECKOUT TIME 12 noon. Please vacate your site by that time. ature Trail Nature Center LAKE TAHOE Picnic/Day-Use Area (Open 6 a.m. to sunset) North Boat House Phipps Cabin Ehrman Mansion Tennis Court Park Office Pier Lakefront Interpretive Tr ail 9 Y8 HW SPEED LIMIT Though the maximum speed VEHICLE PARKING The Ed Z’Berg Sugar Pine limit is 15 mph, when pedestrians, bicyclists and Point parking lot is located on the east side children are present even 15 mph might be too of the campground near the park entrance. fast. Use good judgement. Campsites are designed to accommodate one or two vehicles. Additional vehicles must be parked in the overflow parking lot (call for information on GENERAL CREEK Campground the extra vehicle charge). For parking CAMPGROUND Entrance Station purposes, trailers are considered (Enlarged detail on back) vehicles. ALL VEHICLES MUST BE PARKED ON PAVEMENT. QUIET HOURS Quiet Sugar Pine Cone hours are from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. Dolder N OCCUPANCY Eight people are allowed per family campsite. Park Office Day-Use Entrance Station South Boat House © 2006 California State Parks GENERAL CREEK CAMPGROUND 139 137 140 141 135 133 134 142 131 143 CH 146 129 127 126 175 152 151 153 171 155 157 159 167 168 158 165 160 162 166 156 161 163 164 84 83 88 170 169 154 86 173 87 89 90 91 80 82 100 85 96 92 94 RESERVED CAMPING MOUNTAIN BIKES Use only paved roads, dirt roads and trails designated for bike use. All other trails are closed to mountain bikes. GAMES Volleyball, badminton, horseshoes and similar games are not allowed in the campgrounds or on the beach. 106 105 123 121 117 116 120 118 122 114 112 107 110 115 108 109 111 CH Camp Host Site Parking p4 Grou CH Gr ou p6 GROUP CAMPING SITES 1-10 113 Campfire Center 95 NOISE Radios and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite, regardless of the time of day or night. Engine driven generators or other devices are not to be operated between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m. 124 102 103 101 104 99 98 97 93 79 81 125 77 119 Group 10 Overflow Parking Gro up 8 33 34 59 58 up 7 Gro 150 149 174 172 Family Sites 76-175 78 3 up Gro 148 147 Group 1 (Closed daily 12 noon to 2:00 p.m.) 76 p5 Grou 145 132 130 128 Grou p9 138 15 Minute Parking Gro up 2 136 Campground Entrance Station 40 41 42 4344 45 46 47 Restrooms RV Sanitation FAMILY SITES 40-59 Showers Wood Sales BEAR WARNING Bears may come into the campground at any time of the day or night. Please lock all food in your bear-proof locker. Do not keep food in your tent or sleeping area, in exposed ice chests, or on storage shelves. Place all garbage in dumpsters as soon as possible— do not allow it to accumulate. Improper food storage could result in a citation with a maximum fine of $1,000 (Section 4323 (b) California Code of Regulations). For emergencies call 48 57 56 55 54 53 52 49 50 51 911 Reservations for Camping You may make camping reservations up to seven months and no less than 48 hours in advance by calling 1-800-444-7275 (TTY 1-800-274-7275). Reservations may be charged to your VISA®, Discover® or MasterCard®. To make online reservations, visit our Web site at www.parks.ca.gov.
1960 WINTER OLYMPICS The biathlon and cross-country (XC) events of the VIII Winter Olympics were held in what is now Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park. The General Creek Trail (Red Trail) takes you on a loop through the heart of the men’s events. Here you travel with the spirit of the games on the trails of the biathlon and men’s cross-country ski events. Due to the many VIII Winter Olympic “firsts” future Olympic Winter Games were improved. The electronic timing, mechanical grooming, computer tallied results, television broadcasting and the Biathlon event introduced at the 1960 games have all become international standards. U.S. support for cross-country skiing increased significantly after 1960. Many of the participants of the VIII Winter Games went on to figure prominently in the burgeoning ski industry. Climbing up from the stadium, first leg of the 4x10 relay. Tahoma, CA. 1960 Olympics VIII Winter Games Interpretive Programs Ranger-led interpretive programs are available throughout the winter. Join us for our popular Full Moon snowshoe hikes or ski, on your own, to the 1960 Olympic Biathlon site following the interpretive Sugar pine panels along the route. Call (Pinus lambertiana) the park Snow Phone for dates and times or log on to www.parks.ca.gov. Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point SP Cross-Country Ski Trail Map and Winter Activity Guide NOTE: Programs are subject to weather and snow conditions. PLEASE REMEMBER: • Do not take dogs on the trails. Dogs are allowed only in the parking areas and must be on a leash no more than 6 feet in length. • Do not walk on the ski trails. Walk and snowshoe to the side of the trails. • Day-use parking fees are required. Please self-register at the entrance stations. • Be prepared for severe weather changes. ACCESSIBLE FEATURES The restrooms and park office are accessible. If you need assistance, please call (530) 525-9528 or (530) 525-7232. Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park 7360 West Lake Blvd. or PO Box 266 Tahoma, CA 96142 Snow Phone Information Line: (530) 525-7982 www.parks.ca.gov Visit us on Facebook: “Lake Tahoe California State Parks” Welcome to the winter wonderland of Lake Tahoe’s west shore! Nestled among towering pines, winding through open meadows, following ancient stream paths, and meandering through an historic estate, the park is open year-round for you to discover. You will truly enjoy all that Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park has to offer! Cross-Country Ski Trails Whether your passion is being on skis or on snowshoes, the park offers trails for both experienced and beginning enthusiasts. Five color-coded trails range from one to three miles long. The map on the reverse shows the trailheads and routes. SNOW PHONE INFORMATION LINE: (530) 525-7982 For Emergencies Dial 9 -1-1.
© 2009 California State Parks Printed on Recycled Paper Present day Squaw Valley area with Lake Tahoe in the background (Photo by Hank de Vré) Bottom images, left to right: Rolf Ramgard, silver medalist from Sweden, aided by Sigge Bergman; Tower of Nations; Sigge Bergman, FIS Official; McKinney Stadium view (Photo by Bill Briner); scorekeeping; Veikko Hakulinen (right) from Finland, 4x10k relay gold medal winner (Wendall Broomhall Collection); Olympic sign; Biathalon (Photo by Bill Briner); Wendall “Chummy” Broomhall (left) and Al Merrill (right), ca. 1956 (Wendall Broomhall Collection); course volunteers; finish line; timing officials (Photo by Bill Briner); quonset hut (Photo by Bill Briner); Alex Cushing (Photo by George Silk, courtesy of Squaw Valley Ski Corp.); Olympic logo; Olympic sculpture (Photo by Robert F. Uhte) 1960 Olympic Nordic Events  The 50th Anniversary of the VIII Winter Olympic Games at Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe’s West Shore ED Z’BERG SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK  TAHOMA, CA sHArE tHE spirit People the world over are dedicated to sustaining the Olympic ideal. Each country encourages its amateur athletes to become the absolute best they can be—and some would become the best in the world. drEAm cOmE trUE During February of 1960, millions of people world-wide were captivated by the international VIII Olympic Winter Games at Squaw Valley. The same audiences were thrilled by the official Olympic cross-country races in Tahoma, on Lake Tahoe’s West Shore. CBS, with anchor Walter Cronkite, brought the world to our doorstep. The 1960 Winter Games were the first Olympics to be televised in the United States. Beginning in 1954, Alex Cushing, President of Squaw Valley Ski Corporation, pursued his dream to have the International Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe. Cushing gained endorsement from the International Olympic Committee, the governors and legislatures of California and Nevada, the U.S. Congress and President Eisenhower. By 1960 the State of California Alex Cushing had contributed $8,900,000; another $400,000 came from Nevada, $3,500,000 from the federal government and $2,500,000 from private sources. For eight days, the eyes of the world focused on the Nordic Events stadium that once stood on Gray Avenue, just north of Tahoma. From February 19 to February 27, 1960, Olympians from 19 countries competed in eight cross-country skiing events. The California Olympic Organizing Committee originally planned to hold most of the cross-country competitions at Squaw Valley; only the Biathlon was to be staged at McKinney Creek near Tahoma. By the summer of 1958, it was apparent that real estate development in Squaw Valley made it impossible to hold any of the cross-country races there. The entire cross-country program was moved to the McKinney and General Creek areas. Preparation of the trails began in 1958. The trails were completed by the summer of 1959. California Governor Pat Brown (left) shakes hands with DeWitt Nelson, Director, California Department of Natural Resources (right); photo at right: Opening ceremonies 1960 Olympic Nordic Events: The 50th Anniversary of the VIII Winter Olympic Games at Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe’s West Shore Present day Tahoe West Shore, looking south; photo of Alex Cushing by George Silk, courtesy of Squaw Valley Ski Corp. Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park  Tahoma, CA sHArE tHE spirit People the world over are dedicated to sustaining the Olympic ideal. Each country encourages its amateur athletes to become the absolute best they can be—and some would become the best in the world. drEAm cOmE trUE During February of 1960, millions of people world-wide were captivated by the international VIII Olympic Winter Games at Squaw Valley. The same audiences were thrilled by the official Olympic cross-country races in Tahoma, on Lake Tahoe’s West Shore. CBS, with anchor Walter Cronkite, brought the world to our doorstep. The 1960 Winter Games were the first Olympics to be televised in the United States. Beginning in 1954, Alex Cushing, President of Squaw Valley Ski Corporation, pursued his dream to have the International Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe. Cushing gained endorsement from the International Olympic Committee, the governors and legislatures of California and Nevada, the U.S. Congress and President Eisenhower. By 1960 the State of California Alex Cushing had contributed $8,900,000; another $400,000 came from Nevada, $3,500,000 from the federal government and $2,500,000 from private sources. For eight days, the eyes of the world focused on the Nordic Events stadium that once stood on Gray Avenue, just north of Tahoma. From February 19 to February 27, 1960, Olympians from 19 countries competed in eight cross-country skiing events. The California Olympic Organizing Committee originally planned to hold most of the cross-country competitions at Squaw Valley; only the Biathlon was to be staged at McKinney Creek near Taho
American Name ofinPark B lack Bears State State Park Parks California Thanks to the following agencies for their assistance: El Dorado County U.S. Forest Service, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit California Department of Fish and Game U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tahoe Council for Wild Bears Yosemite National Park Sequoia National Park California State Parks, Sierra District: Mono Lake Tufa SNR Bodie SHP Grover Hot Springs SP Lake Valley SRA Washoe Meadows SP Emerald Bay SP DL Bliss SP Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point SP Ward Creek Unit Tahoe SRA Burton Creek SP Kings Beach SRA Donner Memorial SP Plumas Eureka SP Malakoff Diggins SHP Empire Mine SHP South Yuba River SP Photo: Janice Clark State Parks and Campgrounds in the Sierra District are situated in areas that are also black bear habitat. For more information contact: Park Office, Campground Entry Station or California State Parks Sierra District Headquarters P. O. Box 266 7360 West Lake Blvd. (Highway 89) Tahoma, CA 96142 (530) 525-7232 © 2008 California State Parks (Rev. 2010) Black bears (Ursus americanus) are an important component of California’s ecosystems and a valuable natural legacy for the people of California. The black bear is the only species of bear remaining in California and Nevada. The common name “black bear” is misleading; California black bears may be black, brown, cinnamon, even blonde. Some bears have a white patch on the chest. Bear Encounters - Never approach a bear! In the campground: Do not run. Be aggressive; assert your dominance by standing tall and making noise to scare the bear away. Loudly banging pots and pans together and shouting may work. In the woods: This is the bear’s territory; respect that and do not run. Make eye contact, but don’t stare. Pick up small children. Make yourself appear as large as possible. Stay calm and quiet—back away slowly. Black bears will usually avoid confrontation with humans. Bears will often climb a tree if frightened and usually won’t come down as long as humans or dogs are present. Strict regulations are in place to r­educe conflicts between humans and bears. There is zero tolerance for non-compliance. • Bear-resistant food storage lockers are available at all Sierra District Campgrounds. • All food and refuse must be stored in the bear-resistant lockers provided at all times—unless it is actively being used or transported. • Food-storage lockers must always be closed when not in use— whether or not food or refuse is present. • Food that cannot be stored in the provided bear-resistant lockers must be discarded. Get out of the way! If the bear attempts to get away, do not block the bear’s escape route. Report all bear encounters in state park campgrounds and picnic areas to staff at the park office or entrance station, to campground hosts or to rangers on patrol. • No food, refuse or scented items may be stored in a vehicle in the campground at any time. • Non-compliance may result in eviction from the park or other law enforcement action. Black Bears Facts Adults typically weigh 100 to Diet Bears are omnivorous; their Behavior Black bears can be active 400 pounds and measure between 4 and 6 feet from tip of nose to tail. Males are larger than females. Some adult males may weigh over 500 pounds. Wild bears may live about 25 years. teeth are designed for crushing rather than cutting food, like meat-eating carnivore teeth. Bears’ diets are based on seasonal availability of food. Black bears’ diets consist of seven food categories: grasses, berries, nuts, insects, small mammals, wood fiber, and carrion (decaying flesh). any time during the day or night. As winter approaches, bears will forage for food up to 20 hours a day to store enough fat to sustain them through hibernation. Females give birth to one to three cubs in January, during hibernation. Typically, bears have young every other year. Black bears have curved claws that allow them to climb trees. They often climb to retreat from threats, including humans. A healthy bear may run up to 30 miles per hour for short distances. Black bears are excellent swimmers; they can cross up to 1½ miles of open fresh water for food. Photo: Tammy Evans Food shortages occur in summer and fall when wild food becomes scarce. Bears get bolder and may encounter humans in their search for food. The trunk of your car and your cooler are not bear-proof! Bears may learn to associate wrappers and containers with food and can identify them by sight. They also learn to open vehicle doors. Photo: Janice Clark Black bears may scavenge in garbage cans and dumpsters; they will break into and demolish the interiors of houses, garages, cars and campers. Bears will also raid campsites and food caches, sometimes injuring people. Often these incidents result from careless human behavior. Black bears will usually try to avoid confrontation with humans. If encountered, always leave a bear a clear escape route—especially a bear with cubs. Photo: Scott

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