by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Emerald Bay

State Park - California

Emerald Bay State Park is centered on Lake Tahoe's Emerald Bay, a National Natural Landmark. Park features include Eagle Falls and Vikingsholm, a 38-room mansion that is considered one of the finest examples of Scandinavian architecture in the United States. The architect was Leonard Palme, who was hired by his aunt Laura Knight to design and build Vikingsholm. The park contains the only island in Lake Tahoe, Fannette Island. The park is accessible by California State Route 89 near the southwest shore of the lake. Emerald Bay is one of Lake Tahoe's most photographed and popular locations.

maps

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Carson and Bridgeport area in Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (NF) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Humboldt-Toiyabe MVUM - Carson and Bridgeport Guide 2014

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Carson and Bridgeport area in Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (NF) in Nevada. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=506 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald_Bay_State_Park Emerald Bay State Park is centered on Lake Tahoe's Emerald Bay, a National Natural Landmark. Park features include Eagle Falls and Vikingsholm, a 38-room mansion that is considered one of the finest examples of Scandinavian architecture in the United States. The architect was Leonard Palme, who was hired by his aunt Laura Knight to design and build Vikingsholm. The park contains the only island in Lake Tahoe, Fannette Island. The park is accessible by California State Route 89 near the southwest shore of the lake. Emerald Bay is one of Lake Tahoe's most photographed and popular locations.
D.L. Bliss Emerald Bay s State Parks Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Delight your senses— inhale a Jeffrey pine’s vanilla-scented bark, feel lake water chill your toes, taste a grilled trout, hear a breeze rustle California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 525-3345. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov D.L. Bliss and Emerald Bay State Parks Hwy. 89 / P.O. Box 266, Tahoma, CA 96142 D.L. Bliss (530) 525-7277 Emerald Bay (530) 541-3030 (summer only) Lake Sector Headquarters (530) 525-3345 Cover, back panel, and Eagle Falls photographs courtesy of Ron Maertz © 2001 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) through the pines, and watch bats buzz the beach at twilight. D.L. Bliss and Emerald Bay State Parks include more than six miles of magnificent Lake Tahoe’s west shore, covering 1,830 acres in California’s Sierra Nevada. From the scenic overlook on Highway 89, you can see a brilliant panorama of Emerald Bay, Fannette Island, Lake Tahoe, and the distant Nevada shore. Nearby Eagle Creek cascades over three falls and disappears into the lake. D.L. Bliss State Park is named for a pioneering lumberman, railroad owner, and banker from the region. The Bliss family donated 744 acres to the California State Park System in 1929. The nucleus of Emerald Bay State Park, including Vikingsholm, was sold to the State for half the appraised value by Placerville lumberman Harvey West in 1953. Save the Redwoods League helped raise funds to acquire the land. Emerald Bay was designated a National Natural Landmark by the U.S. Department of Interior in 1969. Summer temperatures at Tahoe range from highs of 80 degrees during the day to the low 40s at night. Winter temperatures average from a high of 40 degrees to a low of 0. Depending on the weather, Eagle Falls the parks are open from late May through September and are closed during the winter. Heavy Sierra snowfall may temporarily close Highway 89 in winter. PARK HISTORY Native People The Washoe (aboriginal Wašiw) were the first people to inhabit the Lake Tahoe basin and the nearby Sierra Nevada range. Washoe have lived in the Tahoe basin since its beginnings. They traveled seasonally: hunting, fishing, and gathering locally available food. The Washoe moved from the lake they called da-ow-aga to the lower valleys in Nevada and California for the winter. Da-ow-aga is revered as the center of the Washoe world. Between 1848 and 1862, the Washoe people’s estimated 10,000 square miles of lakeside and surrounding land were taken during the gold and silver rushes. New settlers logged off the Sierra range to construct mines and dwellings, altering the environment —  contrary to the Washoe values of a healthy environment for the people, water, wildlife, and plants. Their descendants, the Washoe Tribe of California and Nevada, are now engaged in efforts to reclaim portions of their land. The Washoe Tribe operates the Meeks Bay resort and campground concession north of D.L. Bliss State Park. The Washoe people continue to devote their time to their language and culture. The Vikingsholm tour includes the restored summer lodge and interior rooms and concludes with a visit to the sod-roofed garage and carport. Vikingsholm In 1928, Mrs. Lora J. Knight of Santa Barbara purchased this isolated site at the head of Emerald Bay. Knight instructed Lennart Palme, a Swedish-born architect and her nephew by marriage, to design a home for her. Following a trip to Scandinavia, the two decided to use elements found in Norwegian farmsteads and wooden stave churches, without disturbing a single one of the Emerald Bay site’s magnificent trees. Vikingsholm’s construction methods and materials, including granite boulders in the foundations and walls, are the same as those used in ancient Scandinavia. Towers, intricate carvings, and hand-hewn timbers were used to create the home. The sod roofs, with their living grass and flowers, are copied from sites in Norway. Many of the furnishings that Mrs. Knight wanted for Vikingsholm were so historically significant that their export was forbidden by the Norwegian and Swedish governments. She had authentic furnishings duplicated in detail, down to the measurements, colorations, and aging of the wood. Vikingsholm was completed in September 1929. Mrs. Knight spent her summers at the home until her death in 1945. Visitors can take a guided tour of Vikingsholm, li
D.L. Bliss Emerald Bay s Parques Estatales Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. Deleite sus sentidos, huela la madera con aroma a vainilla de los pinos de Jeffrey, sienta cómo el agua del lago refresca sus pies, saboree una trucha a la California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (530) 525-3345. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov D.L. Bliss and Emerald Bay State Parks Hwy. 89 / P.O. Box 266, Tahoma, CA 96142 D.L. Bliss (530) 525-7277 Emerald Bay (530) 541-3030 (summer only) Lake Sector Headquarters (530) 525-3345 Las fotografías de la portada, de la contratapa y de Eagle Falls son cortesía de Ron Maertz. © 2001 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) parrilla, escuche cómo la brisa se filtra entre los pinos y observe los murciélagos chillar al atardecer. L os Parques Estatales D.L. Bliss y Emerald Bay incluyen más de seis millas de la costa oeste del magnífico lago Tahoe, cubriendo 1830 acres de Sierra Nevada en California. Desde la pintoresca vista sobre la Ruta Estatal 89 (Highway 89), se puede apreciar un brillante panorama de Emerald Bay, de la isla Fannete y la distante costa de Nevada. En las cercanías, Eagle Creek cae en tres cascadas y desaparece en el lago. El Parque Estatal D.L. Bliss adquiere su nombre en honor a un maderero, dueño de un ferrocarril y banquero de la región. En 1929, la familia Bliss donó 744 acres al sistema de Parques Estatales de California. En 1953, el maderero de Placerville, Harvey West, le vendió al Estado el núcleo del Parque Estatal Emerald Bay, incluido Vikingsholm, por la mitad de su precio de tasación. La liga Save the Redwoods League contribuyó a recaudar fondos para adquirir la propiedad. En 1969, Emerald Bay fue nombrado Monumento Natural Nacional por el Departamento del Interior de los Estados Unidos. Las temperaturas de verano en Tahoe oscilan entre máximas de 80 °F (27 °C) durante el día, y mínimas de 40 °F (5 °C) Eagle Falls durante la noche. Las temperaturas promedio de invierno oscilan entre máximas de 40 °F (5 °C) y mínimas de 0 °F (-18 °C). Dependiendo de las condiciones climáticas, los parques están abiertos desde fines de mayo hasta septiembre y se encuentran cerrados durante el invierno. Durante el invierno, la gran cantidad de nieve de Sierra puede bloquear temporalmente la Ruta Estatal 89 (Highway 89). HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Pueblos nativos El pueblo washo fue el primero en habitar la cuenca del lago Tahoe y la cercana cadena montañosa de Sierra Nevada. Los washos habitaron la cuenca del Tahoe desde el comienzo. Se trasladaban por temporadas para cazar, pesca y recolectar los alimentos locales disponibles. En el invierno, los washos se mudaban desde lo que ellos llamaban “Da-ow-aga” a los valles bajos en Nevada y California. “Da-ow-aga “ es considerado el centro del mundo washo. Entre 1848 y 1862, la tierra del pueblo washo, que se estimaba en unas 10,000 millas cuadras entre el lago y las zonas aledañas, fueron apropiadas durante la fiebre del oro y la plata. Los nuevos colonos talaron la Sierra para construir minas y edificaciones, alterando así el medioambiente,   lo cual se oponía a los valores washos de conservar un medioambiente saludable para el pueblo, el agua, los animales y las plantas silvestres. Sus descendientes, la tribu washo de California y Nevada, actualmente se esfuerzan por reclamar parte de sus tierras. La tribu washo administra el complejo hotelero en Meeks Bay y la concesión de la zona de campamento al norte del Parque Estatal D.L. Bliss. El pueblo washo continúa dedicando tiempo a su lenguaje y cultura. El tour de Vikingsholm incluye la posada de verano restaurada, las habitaciones interiores y concluye con una visita al garaje y cochera con techo verde. Vikingsholm En 1928, la señora Lora J. Knight de Santa Barbara compró este lugar aislado del punto más alto de Emerald Bay. Knight le indicó a Lennart Palme, un arquitecto suizo y a su sobrino para que diseñen su casa. Luego de hacer un viaje a Escandinavia, ambos decidieron usar elementos de las granjas y de las iglesias con duelas de madera de Noruega, sin interferir con los magníficos árboles de Emerald Bay. Los métodos y los materiales de construcción de Vikingsholm, incluidas las rocas de granito de los cimientos y de las paredes, son los mismos que los usados en l
Emerald Bay State Park Eagle Point Campground Map (Not to Scale) 78 77 81 80 82 79 76 74 96 94 97 71 70 69 67 68 66 65 Underwater Barge and Buoy 84 75 73 72 58 95 57 64 63 89 88 87 85 86 83 61 93 91 90 56 HOST 50 55 54 62 92 60 53 52 59 51 49 48 47 39 34 36 37 35 46 45 43 44 41 42 38 40 30 33 Entrance Station 31 32 2 19 18 15 11 14 16 17 9 12 13 6 10 5 7 8 4 3 1 HOST 29 28 27 26 25 23 21 24 20 22 Campfire Center Restroom Shower Viewpoint HOST 1 To Vikingsholm (1.7 mi.) To Tahoe City & I-80 To South Lake Tahoe & US-50
diving safety in lake tahoe Exquisite sites for scuba diving can be found throughout Lake Tahoe. While we encourage you to enjoy this activity, we recommend that you dive conservatively. Diving-related accidents occur every year in Lake Tahoe. Because of the high altitude and extremely cold water conditions, it is essential that divers observe all safety precautions. These precautions include: • Wearing appropriate dive gear • Diving only with a buddy • Conducting pre-dive equipment checks • Becoming certified to dive at high altitudes • Using high-altitude dive tables from your local dive store. BE SAFE AND ENJOY! California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 525-9528. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Emerald Bay & D.L. Bliss Underwater State Parks 9881 Highway 89, Tahoma, CA 96142 (530) 525-9528 © 2012 California State Parks Printed on Recycled Paper Diver’s Guide Emerald Bay & D.L. Bliss Underwater State Parks Emerald Bay Underwater Park Breathtaking Emerald Bay was designated an underwater state park in 1994. As a scuba diver in Emerald Bay, you will enjoy the lake from an entirely different perspective—one that most visitors will never experience. The bay is the final resting place for a number of boats, launches and barges that were used in the construction of Vikingsholm castle in the late 1900s. Certified divers have the unique opportunity to explore these classic artifacts, which sank more than a century ago during the heyday of the legendary Emerald Bay Resort. Barge Dive Site (Boat Access) In 1994, the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, in cooperation with California State Parks, installed a mooring buoy at the Barge Dive Site, located on the southeast shore of Emerald Bay. At this site, divers can visit two large historic barges with California’s first underwater interpretive panel in approximately 35 feet of water. Emerald Forest Dive Site (Boat Access) The Emerald Forest dive site is the result of a dramatic 1955 landslide, when the steep slope above Highway 89 collapsed and slid into Emerald Bay, southeast of Vikingsholm. The landslide scar is still visible from the Vikingsholm Day Use parking lot. The effect of the collapse can be seen in the dive site, where large tree trunks rise from the depths, creating a stunning underwater forest. All artifacts discovered while diving in the park are protected by state law and may not be disturbed or removed, regardless of size or value. D.L. BLISS Underwater Park Lester Beach (Vehicle Access & Parking) Deep diving off of the Rubicon Wall, south of Lester Beach in D.L. Bliss State Park, has become an exceptionally popular activitiy for advanced divers. Due to the clarity of the water and the spectacular geologic formations, the site ranks as one of the world’s most beautiful dives. diving-related emergencies • Bring the victim to the surface SLOWLY! • Activate Emergency Medical Services: > Call 9-1-1. A telephone is located at the Vikingsholm visitor center (see symbol on map) > The marine radio emergency channel is 16. Call the Coast Guard Station at Lake Tahoe. • Contact Divers Alert Network at (919) 684-9111 to find the nearest available hyperbaric chamber.
American Name ofinPark B lack Bears State State Park Parks California Thanks to the following agencies for their assistance: El Dorado County U.S. Forest Service, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit California Department of Fish and Game U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tahoe Council for Wild Bears Yosemite National Park Sequoia National Park California State Parks, Sierra District: Mono Lake Tufa SNR Bodie SHP Grover Hot Springs SP Lake Valley SRA Washoe Meadows SP Emerald Bay SP DL Bliss SP Ed Z’berg Sugar Pine Point SP Ward Creek Unit Tahoe SRA Burton Creek SP Kings Beach SRA Donner Memorial SP Plumas Eureka SP Malakoff Diggins SHP Empire Mine SHP South Yuba River SP Photo: Janice Clark State Parks and Campgrounds in the Sierra District are situated in areas that are also black bear habitat. For more information contact: Park Office, Campground Entry Station or California State Parks Sierra District Headquarters P. O. Box 266 7360 West Lake Blvd. (Highway 89) Tahoma, CA 96142 (530) 525-7232 © 2008 California State Parks (Rev. 2010) Black bears (Ursus americanus) are an important component of California’s ecosystems and a valuable natural legacy for the people of California. The black bear is the only species of bear remaining in California and Nevada. The common name “black bear” is misleading; California black bears may be black, brown, cinnamon, even blonde. Some bears have a white patch on the chest. Bear Encounters - Never approach a bear! In the campground: Do not run. Be aggressive; assert your dominance by standing tall and making noise to scare the bear away. Loudly banging pots and pans together and shouting may work. In the woods: This is the bear’s territory; respect that and do not run. Make eye contact, but don’t stare. Pick up small children. Make yourself appear as large as possible. Stay calm and quiet—back away slowly. Black bears will usually avoid confrontation with humans. Bears will often climb a tree if frightened and usually won’t come down as long as humans or dogs are present. Strict regulations are in place to r­educe conflicts between humans and bears. There is zero tolerance for non-compliance. • Bear-resistant food storage lockers are available at all Sierra District Campgrounds. • All food and refuse must be stored in the bear-resistant lockers provided at all times—unless it is actively being used or transported. • Food-storage lockers must always be closed when not in use— whether or not food or refuse is present. • Food that cannot be stored in the provided bear-resistant lockers must be discarded. Get out of the way! If the bear attempts to get away, do not block the bear’s escape route. Report all bear encounters in state park campgrounds and picnic areas to staff at the park office or entrance station, to campground hosts or to rangers on patrol. • No food, refuse or scented items may be stored in a vehicle in the campground at any time. • Non-compliance may result in eviction from the park or other law enforcement action. Black Bears Facts Adults typically weigh 100 to Diet Bears are omnivorous; their Behavior Black bears can be active 400 pounds and measure between 4 and 6 feet from tip of nose to tail. Males are larger than females. Some adult males may weigh over 500 pounds. Wild bears may live about 25 years. teeth are designed for crushing rather than cutting food, like meat-eating carnivore teeth. Bears’ diets are based on seasonal availability of food. Black bears’ diets consist of seven food categories: grasses, berries, nuts, insects, small mammals, wood fiber, and carrion (decaying flesh). any time during the day or night. As winter approaches, bears will forage for food up to 20 hours a day to store enough fat to sustain them through hibernation. Females give birth to one to three cubs in January, during hibernation. Typically, bears have young every other year. Black bears have curved claws that allow them to climb trees. They often climb to retreat from threats, including humans. A healthy bear may run up to 30 miles per hour for short distances. Black bears are excellent swimmers; they can cross up to 1½ miles of open fresh water for food. Photo: Tammy Evans Food shortages occur in summer and fall when wild food becomes scarce. Bears get bolder and may encounter humans in their search for food. The trunk of your car and your cooler are not bear-proof! Bears may learn to associate wrappers and containers with food and can identify them by sight. They also learn to open vehicle doors. Photo: Janice Clark Black bears may scavenge in garbage cans and dumpsters; they will break into and demolish the interiors of houses, garages, cars and campers. Bears will also raid campsites and food caches, sometimes injuring people. Often these incidents result from careless human behavior. Black bears will usually try to avoid confrontation with humans. If encountered, always leave a bear a clear escape route—especially a bear with cubs. Photo: Scott

also available

National Parks
USFS NW