Pío Pico

State Historic Park - California

Pío Pico State Historic Park is the site of El Ranchito, also known as the Pío Pico Adobe or Pío Pico Mansion, the final home of Pío Pico, the last Governor of Alta California under Mexican rule and a pivotal figure in early California history. Located in Whittier, California, at 6003 Pioneer Blvd. near Whittier Blvd. and Interstate 605, it is California Historical Landmark No. 127, listed as "Casa de Governor Pío Pico". Just west of the park is the San Gabriel River. Across the river is the city that bears his name - Pico Rivera. The park consists of the adobe and about three acres of surrounding land.
https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=621 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pio_Pico_State_Historic_Park Pío Pico State Historic Park is the site of El Ranchito, also known as the Pío Pico Adobe or Pío Pico Mansion, the final home of Pío Pico, the last Governor of Alta California under Mexican rule and a pivotal figure in early California history. Located in Whittier, California, at 6003 Pioneer Blvd. near Whittier Blvd. and Interstate 605, it is California Historical Landmark No. 127, listed as "Casa de Governor Pío Pico". Just west of the park is the San Gabriel River. Across the river is the city that bears his name - Pico Rivera. The park consists of the adobe and about three acres of surrounding land.
Our Mission Pío Pico State Historic Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. All who come into social “ or business relations with the venerable ex-Governor . . . bear witness to his kindness of heart . . . his uniform courtesy . . . California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (562) 695-1217. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Pío Pico State Historic Park 6003 Pioneer Boulevard Whittier, CA 90606 (562) 695-1217 © 2014 California State Parks his entire lack of malice toward any human being.” - Henry Barrows friend of Pío Pico (1894) P ío Pico State Historic Park commemorates the vibrant life and times of Pío de Jesùs Pico IV. Don Pío Pico was a prominent figure in nineteenth-century California’s business, civic and political life, including service as the last territorial governor under Mexican rule. PARK HISTORY The Tongva The Tongva people have lived and thrived in this area for at least 2,500 years. After the Spanish settled Alta California in 1769, Tongva lifestyle changed significantly. Many were taken into Spanish colonial society through the nearby Mission San Gabriel Arcángel, established in 1771. The Spanish called those Tongva associated with the mission “Gabrieleños.” Local Tongva worked for Pío Pico after he acquired 8,991 acres of mission lands for his Paso de Bartolo rancho. This park is all that remains of the acreage. the de anza expedition Spain had a tenuous hold on the frontier territory of Alta California. By the time of de Anza’s expedition, fewer than 200 Spaniards called Alta California home. Juan Bautista de Anza, from Fronteras on Mexico’s Sonoran frontier, organized and financed a trip in 1774 to find an overland passage to Alta California. This crossing paved the way for another expedition in 1775-76, which would escort a mixed group of soldiers from presidios in Sonora with their wives and children  —  30 families in all  —  to settle in Alta California. The colonists were descendants of Spaniards and other Europeans, indigenous people of Mexico, and Africans brought to work in New Spain. pÍo pico The de Anza expedition brought Pico’s parents, José Maria Pico and Maria Estaquia Gutierrez  , from Mexico to Alta California as children. Their families settled at Mission San Gabriel. Pío de Jesus Pico, the fourth of ten children and the second son, was born there on May 5, 1801. His mixed ancestry included the Spanish, Italian, African, and Native American blood of his forebears. The Pico and Gutierrez Families The lineage of José Maria Pico can be traced back to the early 1600s. This initial traceable ancestor was Count Mazzi of Pico (a town in central Italy). Four generations later, the count’s great, great grandson Santiago Pico lived in Sinaloa and married Maria Jacinta Vastida, Doña Maria and Don Pío Pico, with their nieces a descendant of African slaves. Among their children accompanying them on the de Anza expedition was their son, José Maria Pico. José later married Maria Estaquia Gutierrez. Their marriage would produce ten children, including the future governor of Alta California. The family moved to San Diego in 1805. In 1819 Pío Pico’s father died, leaving the 19-yearold to support the family while his older brother, José Antonio, served in the military. Pío Pico became a merchant selling liquor, groceries and dry goods. Detail of “El Ranchito” mural by local college students Pío Pico became a member of the territorial assembly in 1826. His political alliances brought him into the “revolutionary politics” of Mexican California. He served as interim governor for 20 days in 1832, after the ousting of Governor Manuel Victoria. In 1834, at age 33, Pío Pico married Maria Ygnacia Alvarado. The two did not have any children together, but the Picos adopted two sons and two daughters. mexican california Well before Mexico won its independence in 1821, Spain’s other American colonies had also rebelled against the Spanish monarchy and sought self-government. These rebellions had curtailed the arrival of Spanish supply ships, so trading restrictions had been lifted. Californios (Spanish-speaking Latinos who lived in the state from 1769 until statehood) were now allowed to deal with traders from England, France, Russia and the United States. Foreign trade, individual land Andrés Pico grants, and secula

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