Marshall Gold Discovery

State Historic Park - California

Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park marks the discovery of gold by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in 1848, sparking the California Gold Rush. The park grounds include much of the historic town of Coloma, California, which is now considered a ghost town as well as a National Historic Landmark District. The park contains two California Historical Landmarks: a monument to commemorate James Marshall (#143) and the actual spot where he first discovered gold in 1848 (#530).

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Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=484 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Gold_Discovery_State_Historic_Park Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park marks the discovery of gold by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in 1848, sparking the California Gold Rush. The park grounds include much of the historic town of Coloma, California, which is now considered a ghost town as well as a National Historic Landmark District. The park contains two California Historical Landmarks: a monument to commemorate James Marshall (#143) and the actual spot where he first discovered gold in 1848 (#530).
Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. “ Monday 24th. This day some kind of mettle was found in the tail race that looks like goald, first discovered by James Martial, the Boss of the Mill.” California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 622-3470. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park Hwy. 49/Coloma Road at Bridge Street PO Box 265, Coloma, CA 95613 (530) 622-3470 www.parks.ca.gov/marshallgold © 2004 California State Parks (Rev. 2017)  — from Henry Bigler’s Diary, January 1848 A long California’s historic Highway 49, tucked neatly into a beautifully forested valley in the Sierra foothills, Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park straddles the South Fork of the American River. Here, on January 24, 1848, James Marshall found gold flakes in the tailrace and sparked one of history’s largest human migrations. Photo courtesy of California State Library, Sacramento, California their home along the American River “Cullumah,” now known as Coloma. As “river people,” they enjoyed an abundance of freshwater fish as well as waterfowl, elk, deer, and small game and lived on a staple diet of acorns, seeds, and fruits. The hollowed-out holes in a large bedrock in the park —  the last remaining evidence of the native people’s original presence here  —  show how they processed the acorns that Sutter’s Mill replica formed their main diet. Until they met fur trappers in the late PARK HISTORY 1820s, the native people had little contact Native People with the outside world. By the late 1830s, For thousands of years, the Nisenan and however, diseases introduced by the foothill Miwok people built their domenewcomers had nearly decimated shaped houses and cedar bark structures the native people. When gold was in villages along the streams and discovered along the American River tributaries that drained into the in the Coloma Valley, hordes of goldAmerican, Cosumnes, Bear, seekers seized control of the California and Yuba rivers. They called Indians’ fishing and gathering sites. By 1849, the remaining native people who Watercolor of an Eastern had survived the combined hardships Miwok woman fashioning a of disease and conflicts with settlers seed-gathering basket, had dispersed to more remote foothills by Seth Eastman and valleys. A few turned to mining, and some went to work for John Sutter. January 24, 1848  —  GOLD DISCOVERY John Sutter was founder of “New Helvetia” —  later named Sacramento  —   and a vast agricultural empire in the Sacramento Valley. He partnered with James W. Marshall to go into the Artwork courtesy of W. Duncan and Nevin MacMillan, and Afton Historical Society Press lumber business. They selected Coloma Valley, 45 miles east of Sutter’s fort, as a mill site because it had a river for power and stands of large ponderosa pine trees for lumber. As equal partners, Sutter would furnish the capital and Marshall would oversee the mill’s construction and daily operation. In the fall of 1847, Marshall began construction of the mill with a labor force that included local Indians and members of the U.S. Army Mormon Battalion. A low dam was built across the river to direct part of the stream into the diversion channel that would carry it through the mill. By January of the next year, the mill was ready to be tested. However, the tailrace, which carried water away from the mill, was too shallow, backing up water and preventing the mill wheel from turning properly. To deepen John A. Sutter the tailrace, each day the Indian laborers loosened the rock. At night, water was allowed to run through the ditch to wash away the loose debris from that day’s diggings. On the morning of January 24, 1848, while inspecting the millrace, Marshall spotted some shiny flecks in the tailrace. l, workers readily gave him a tithe He scooped them up fighting alongside the Americans during of the gold they had found. When and pounded them with their conquest of California in 1846, he Brannan visited San Francisco a rock; he then placed returned home to discover his cattle strayed in May, he paraded the streets them in the crown of or stolen. He met again with John Sutter, waving a quinine bottle full of who gave him the task of finding a site to his hat and hurried to gold, shouting, “Gold! Gold! Gold build their new sawmill. announce his find t
Parque Estatal Histórico Marshall Gold Discovery Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. “ Lunes 24. Este día cierto metal que parece oro se encontró en el canal de fuga, primer descubrimiento de James Martial, el jefe del molino”. California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (530) 622-3470. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park Hwy. 49/Coloma Road at Bridge Street Coloma, CA 95613 (530) 622-3470 www.parks.ca.gov/marshallgold © 2004 California State Parks (Rev. 2015)  — del diario de Henry Bigler, Enero de 1848 A lo largo de la histórica Ruta Estatal 49, inmersa en el boscoso y hermoso valle de la falda de Sierra, el Parque Estatal Histórico Marshall Gold Discovery se extiende a lo largo de South Fork del Río de los Americanos. Aquí, el 24 de enero de 1848, James Marshall encontró escamas de oro en el cauce del río y produjo uno de los más grandes movimientos migratorios en la historia de la humanidad. La fotografía es cortesía de la Biblioteca Estatal de California, Sacramento, California. y Yuba. Llamaban a su lugar, que se extendía a lo largo del Río de los Americanos, “Cullumah”, actualmente conocido como Coloma. Como “pueblo de río”, disfrutaban de abundancia en pescados de agua dulce así como también aves acuáticas, uapitíes, ciervos y pequeño animales de caza y la base de su alimentación eran las Monumento a Marshall bellotas, las semillas y las HISTORIA DEL PARQUE frutas. Las perforaciones que se encuentran Los indígenas en las grandes rocas del parque  —  la última Por miles de años, los pueblos nisenan y evidencia de la presencia de pueblos nativos miwok de la falda construyeron sus casas con originarios aquí  —  demuestran el modo en forma de domos y estructuras de corteza que procesaban las bellotas que formaban de cedros en las villas, a lo largo parte de su dieta principal. de los arroyos y ríos afluentes Hasta que se toparon con los tramperos que desembocan en los ríos a fines de la década de 1820, los pueblos Americano, Cosumnes, Oso nativos tenían poco contacto con el mundo exterior. Sin embargo, a fines de la década Acuarela de una mujer miwok de 1830, las enfermedades que trajeron los del este haciendo una cesta nuevos pobladores casi diezman los pueblos de recolección de semillas, de Seth Eastman nativos por completo. Cuando se descubrió oro a lo largo del Río de los Americanos en el valle de Coloma, una multitud de buscadores de oro tomaron el control de los lugares que los pueblos nativos de California utilizaban para pescar y recolectar alimentos. Para 1849, los nativos que sobrevivieron a los infortunios causados por las enfermedades y a los conflictos con los colonos se dispersaron a faldas y valles más recónditos. Algunos se dedicaron a la minería y otros trabajaron para John Sutter. EL DESCUBRIMIENTO DE ORO  —  24 DE ENERO DE 1848 John Sutter fue el fundador de la “Nueva Helvetia”  —  luego renombrada como Sacramento  —  y de un vasto imperio agrícola en el valle de Sacramento. Se asoció con James W. Marshall para entrar en el negocio de la madera. Eligieron el valle de Coloma (a 45 millas al este del Fuerte de Sutter) como lugar para el molino debido a que contaba con un río que prestaría la energía y rodales de grandes pinos ponderosa que aportarían la madera. Como socios igualitarios, Sutter aportaría el capital y Marshall supervisaría la construcción del molino y su funcionamiento diario. En el otoño de 1847, Marshall comenzó la construcción del molino John A. Sutter con mano de obra que incluía a los nativos locales y miembros del batallón del ejército mormón de los Estados Unidos. Se construyó una represa baja que cruzaba el río para desviar parte del caudal de agua a un canal de derivación que llegaría hasta el molino. Para enero del año siguiente, el molino estaba listo para ser probado. Obra de arte cortesía de W. Duncan y Nevin MacMillan, y Afton Historical Society Press LA HISTORIA DE JAMES MARSHALL Sin embargo, el canal de la misma conclusión que Marshall. fuga, que llevaba el agua Conscientes de su inversión en el A fines de la década de 1830, el originario desde el molino, era poco molino, acordaron mantener la de Nueva Jersey, James Marshall, viajó hacia profundo lo cual producía noticia en secreto hasta que

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